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Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law
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Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law

4.50  ·  Rating details ·  34 ratings  ·  6 reviews
ProPublica’s groundbreaking investigation into housing segregation, and the federal government’s large-scale failure to uphold the laws meant to prevent it

More than forty years after President Johnson signed the landmark Fair Housing Act into law, residential segregation in America remains unresolved. Designed to help dismantle the nation’s racially divided housing pattern
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ebook, 38 pages
Published October 29th 2012 by ProPublica (first published January 1st 2012)
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Scott Schneider
Jan 31, 2017 rated it really liked it
Racial segregation is a systemic problem that is only getting worse in the US. It didn't have to be this way. Back in the 60's Congress passed Fair Housing legislation which was championed by George Romney, then HUD Secretary under Nixon. He was summarily dismissed and since then every attempt to use the government to encourage integrated housing has stumbled. A fascinating read and well worth the $1.49 e-book.
Kyle
Apr 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing
While short, this is by no means in-exhaustive research. Hannah-Jones does a remarkable job digging into the strange world of Fair Housing and HUD. An essential read for anyone who gives a damn when it comes to housing issues (i.e. everyone). Shoutout to George Romney for (surprisingly) attempting to fight the good fight.
Martha
Sep 15, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: e-book, non-fiction, own
Fantastic read. I learned a lot. George Romney - who knew?
Lennyag
Jul 09, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very good

I learned so much from this book. Required reading for anyone wanting to understand the causes of segregation and the role the Federal government played in perpetuating it.
Carlo
May 24, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Hannah Jones’ journalism and historical framing are incredible. Reading this alongside The New Jim Crow was very....man oh man
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Nikole Hannah-Jones is an American investigative journalist known for her coverage of civil rights in the United States. In April 2015, she became a staff writer for The New York Times.