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Fahrenheit 451

3.98  ·  Rating details ·  1,460,813 ratings  ·  41,626 reviews
Alternate covers for this ISBN can be found here and here

THE TERRIFYING PROPHETIC NOVEL OF A POST-LITERATURE FUTURE...

Guy Montag is a fireman. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the source of all discord and unhappiness: the printed book.

Montag never questions the destruction or his own bland life, until he is shown a past where people didn’t live in
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Paperback, 227 pages
Published August 4th 2008 by HarperVoyager (first published October 19th 1953)
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Brian McGoldrick This is one of the greatest scifi novels ever written. I never found Fahrenheit 451 to be weird. Disturbing yes, but never weird. Today more than ever…moreThis is one of the greatest scifi novels ever written. I never found Fahrenheit 451 to be weird. Disturbing yes, but never weird. Today more than ever I wonder if it is more prophetic than anything. The works of older authors are being censored to remove "objectionable" and "politically incorrect" content, before they can be read in schools and universities. Little babies who are theoretically supposed to university students are screaming and crying because books and ideas offend them and hurt their feelings. They want "safe zones" and "trigger warnings" to protect their fragile little egos. How long before the cry goes up to start burning the objectionable books? Oh, never mind, that cry is already going up from some of those precious snowflakes. With the way we are going, a society like Fahrenheit 451 may be entirely too possible.(less)
Julie Yes if your biggest fear is someone coming to your home and burning all your books. lol

Community Reviews

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3.98  · 
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 ·  1,460,813 ratings  ·  41,626 reviews


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J.G. Keely
Farenheit 451 has been analyzed and reinterpreted by every successive generation to change its meaning. This is chiefly because the book is full of assumptions and vague symbolism which can be taken many ways, and rarely does anyone come away from the book with the conclusion the author intended, which would suggest that it is a failed attempt.

There are grounds to contend that even the title is inaccurate, since contemporary sources suggest paper combusts at 450 degrees Celsius, which in Farenhe
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Brian
Jan 23, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Every single human being
Recommended to Brian by: My mother
I am in 6th grade. My Language Arts teacher assigns us a book report; tells us we can choose the book but that our grade will be based on the maturity of the novel the report is based upon.

My mother and I are in K-mart. I've mentioned to her about this book report to be done, and so before we leave with a basket filled with clothes I know I will be embarrassed to wear, we stop by the rack of books. She selects a few pulp paperback titles, throws them into the cart.

A few days later she hands me F
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She-Who-Reads
Somehow, I have gotten through life as an English major, book geek, and a science-fiction nerd without ever having read this book. I vaguely remember picking it up in high-school and not getting very far with it. It was an interesting premise, but far too depressing for my tastes at the time.

Fast-forward 15 years later. I just bought a copy the other day to register at BookCrossing for their Banned Books Month release challenge. The ALA celebrates Banned Books Week in September, so one BXer chal
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Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
Apr 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: book lovers everywhere
“There must be something in books, something we can’t imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don’t stay for nothing.”

The burning of books is such an effective tool for controlling the population, so the message of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 is scarily real. If society’s wisdom could be taken away, then so could their freedom. If knowledge was burnt, then the people would be left in a complete state of utter innocent ignorance. There would be no
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Justin
Oct 01, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
You can check out thousands of better reviews here and across the internet, but here is all you really need to know...

This is one of the best books ever written. This is one of my favorite books of all time. ALL TIME. This is the third time I've read it. I audiobooked it this time.

Every line of Fahrenheit 451 is beautifully written. Poetic. Metaphoric. Transcendent. Awesome. The beginning, middle, and ending... all amazing.

If you consider yourself a fan of science fiction or dystopian novels o
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Emily May
As I write this review, the year is 2012. We do not live in a perfect world; in fact, in many ways we don't even live in a good world. But one thing I believe with all my heart is that we live in a world which, on the whole, is better than it was fifty years ago. Now, I know I'm writing with limited perspective and that progression and development hasn't been the same all over the globe and even the definition of those words can change depending on what part of the world you live in. But here's ...more
Fabian
Sep 26, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
"We are living in a time when flowers are trying to live on flowers, instead of growing on good rain & black loam." (111)

What outstanding prose--prophetic, which is by far the most rare and inspiring of attributes a work of literature can ever possess. & Ray "I Don't Talk Things, Sir. I Talk The Meaning Of Things" Bradbury is here at his absolute best. I cannot decide whether this or "Martian Chronicles" is my favorite... they are definitely my favorite of his, the best possible possibly
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Tyler
Dec 28, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Few appreciate irony as much as I do, so understand that I understand this review. The message of this book is decent: knowledge should not be censored. However, the rest of the book is utter shit. I found myself actually screaming at several points as Bradbury spent minutes and dozens of metaphors and allusions referring to one insignificant detail of the plot. It is too damn flowery to be understandable by anyone! In other words, an English teacher's dream. In addition, the story was about the ...more
Lyn
Jul 30, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 is a novel that transcends it's dystopian theme and delivers its cautionary message in a timeless fashion, what made this story compelling in 1953 remains provocative.

It is a strident call to arms, a warning siren of darkness always on the perimeter.

Critics have tried to make more of this, and certainly it is an archetypal work, but I think its simplicity is its great strength - it is fundamentally about book burning, literally and metaphorically. A powerful allegory t
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Alex
"The good writers touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies."
That is a very unpleasant metaphor, and Fahrenheit 451 is an unpleasant book. It feels like it was written by a teenager, and if I were his teacher I'd give it a B- and not let my daughter date the weird little kid who wrote it.

Its protagonist, Montag, lacks any character; he changes as Bradbury's shitty story requires him to, from the dumbest kid on the world (his
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Cecily
Apr 15, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who think sci-fi and literature can't overlap

Library as cathedral, as all libraries should be - John Rylands Library, Manchester. Image source

Read me, love me, touch me, treasure me

This is a book about the power of books that is itself steeped with references, both explicit and indirect, to the great works that permeate our culture so thoroughly that we do not always notice them - until they’re gone. Bradbury shows us the horror of a hedonistic but unhappy world where books and ideas are banned in the futile pursuit of the illusion of hap
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Lisa
Jun 25, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Wall Controls You - The Silent Take-Over Of Screen-Time!

What does "Fahrenheit 451" mean to me? Most of all, it is a declaration of love for books in an era of fast entertainment and instant gratification as a means of political control of the masses.

I used to think Brave New World and 1984 - or a combination of those two - had a more accurate take on human mind-slavery in the age of technology than "Fahrenheit 451". But increasingly, I see the world as Bradbury saw it, with people sitting i
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Elyse Walters
Mar 04, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was my first Ray Bradbury book. Do you know - that with 1, 117, 082 ratings, and
28, 668 reviews-I didn't have a clue what to expect from this book? I may have been the only person living under a rock - down deep beneath the earth -who knew nothing about this story! My Goodness .......
"I CANT IMAGINE A WORLD WITHOUT BOOKS!!!!!"

I have in my hands a copy of the 60th Anniversary Edition. Neil Gaiman wrote the Introduction.... and really excellent I might add! Just beautiful introduction abou
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Kinga
Dec 05, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
It’s easy to see why ‘Farenheit 451’ is a cult classic, beloved by the majority of bookworms. Oh, it validates us, doesn’t it? Here is a future world where books are banned, and look at this; it has gone to the dogs. The saddest of all post-apocalyptic worlds, the bleakest dystopia, what a nightmare – NO BOOKS!

The good are those who read, the bad are those who watch the TV. Yes, this is what we like to read to make us feel all warm inside. And because of that we are seemingly willing to forgive
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Matthew
There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens:
a time to be born and a time to die,
a time to plant and a time to uproot,
a time to kill and a time to heal,
a time to tear down and a time to build,
a time to weep and a time to laugh,
a time to mourn and a time to dance,
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
a time to search and a time to give up,
a time to keep and a time to throw away,
a time to tear
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Federico DN
A book, a flamethrower, and a very troubled mind.

In a dystopian future, firemen don't put out fires... they start it. Books, and freethinkers, are burned with a flamethrower without a seconds thought. Guy Montag, one of these incendiary firemen, after a series of events starts awakening from his long and blind indoctrination. To his horror, he finds an identity and a mind of his own. But in a completely monitored and subjugated society, thinking can cost your life. One single mistake and Guy may
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karen
so i decided that this is the summer i read all the books i "should" have read by now- all the classics i have not gotten around to. this was, oddly, sparked by that asshole that said to alyssa "this is why small bookstores are better - no one in big bookstores knows anything about books". which is, of course, inaccurate and ridiculous - poor alyssa is a nineteen year old girl who has not read any philip roth, and wasnt able to recommend a title to the (fifty year old) man but has probably read ...more
Luffy
Apr 18, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Reading Fahrenheit was an eye opener. I thought that the golden and silver eras of science fiction had works that have aged with the grace of the Rolling Stones. But here is a book to prove me wrong.

Fahrenheit might be the book by which I rate and measure and gauge and review science fiction books. I wish this is not a false dawn, nor an exception to the rule.

The book's theme is crisp in its actuality. This was a prophetic book. I rejoiced in the perfect pace that was contained in so relatively
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Peter
May 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror
An absolute anti-utopian classic of the 20th century. I did a speech about that book in class (in 1988 I guess) to convince the other pupils how important this books is. The temperature at which books burn. No slowdown, only highspeed on the streets, reality shows at home with you being part of it, a world dominated by a government given truth. What happens if someone dares to look behind the scenes? Dares to read a uncensored book? Who is this group trying to find the truth beyond the fact fals ...more
Brian Hodges
Believe me, I'm not the kind of guy who gushes over classics simply by virtue of the fact that they are classics, but this one was worth all the legend that it carries with it. I'm glad I never had to read this book in highschool. First of all, we would have ruined this truly awesome story by overanalyzing every mundane literary aspect, detail and device. Second, the story is SO much more profound in the year 2008 at the age of 30 than it could have been at 17 in 1995.

I always thought this was
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Greg Watson
Feb 06, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Some time ago, I remembered seeing a portion of the Fahrenheit 451 film. So, I knew something about the story before reading the novel. However, I discovered far more than I expected.

My thought was that the firemen in the novel burn books with no idea or knowledge of their contents. However, in the case of Captain Beatty, this turned out to be false. He knows what is in books (many books) and can quote them at length. His mindset is a reminder that knowledge can be rewarding but also unsettling.
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Henry Avila
Nov 17, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In Ray Bradbury's creepy classic, Montag is your typical modern fireman , burning books for a living with his dedicated gang. None of that old -fashioned putting out fires, he and a hose full of kerosene and just a little old match, does the trick. Sets books a blazing, it's more fun too! Besides no one reads anymore and the warm inferno, towering high into the sky, makes a pretty picture, lighting the cold, dark night . Father was a fireman, so was his grandfather, the family business, you can ...more
Evgeny
Jan 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: scifi
It was a pleasure to burn.
Quote

Damn you, Ray Bradbury! Damn you!!! You wrote something that manged to scare me. Old cynical me who got desensitized by watching news with almost daily school shootings, bombs blowing in the Middle East non-stop, and ISIS doing its best to make sure everybody hates them with a passion. What is so scary about Fahrenheit 451? Lots of thing described in this dystopia hits too close to home.

Everybody heard this expression people say trying to appear cool "1984 was a warnin
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Warda
Sep 15, 2018 rated it really liked it
Such an enlightening read. Ray Bradbury, a true bookworm.
There’s so much depth to this story, of his analysis of society, that I’m finding it difficult to put my thoughts into words.

This is the type of book that one can read and every paragraph would bring about beautiful discussions.

It’s passionate. It’s written with so much love and wisdom, and emotion. It speaks about a crime that has happened and he was fearing for the American society at the time and its reduction in interest in literatu
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Ginger
Apr 17, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2017
That’s right, I finally showed up at the party! I somehow have gone through life as a book geek and a science-fiction nerd without reading this book. It was always on my to-do-list but over the years, I just didn't get around to reading it. Thank you Justin for kicking my ass in gear to read this masterpiece!

So you ask, what happened when I finally read Fahrenheit 451?

I read it in one day!!!! I absorbed the pages while ignoring the world around me. I laughed and gasped at amazing quotes in the b
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J.L.   Sutton
Apr 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Extraordinary novel which still resonates!! I remembered enjoying Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 several years ago. This time, it felt even more powerful. There are some great dystopian novels out there--1984, Handmaid's Tale, Brave New World, Oryx & Crake. Many others come to mind. What's different about Fahrenheit 451 is the sense that it is okay to hope for better days. Margaret Atwood's Handmaid's Tale, for instance, ends well after Offred's story has ended and Gilead is an academic subje ...more
Aqsa (On Hiatus)
Okay, so I wasn't sure about this one at all but it pulled me in from the first line to be honest and I'm glad to have read it and understood what messages it gave. It's not about just burning books and living a life where you are so damn busy to even think. It's so much more really.
It was an eye opener and it was something I knew-something we all know-but we don't really say it or even believe it.

We all live in this amazing world where we have so much to be grateful for, but we never are. We ar
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Heidi The Reader
Jan 31, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: dystopian, classics
In a not too distant future, owning books is against the law. Firemen burn property instead of protect it and everyone is dialed in to their televisions, subsisting on a steady stream of sensational media stories and vapid entertainment to numb their quickly congealing brains. The nation is always at war, but you would never guess it from the populace's empty conversations and emptier dreams. Guy Montag longs for something different, but what exactly, he can't even say, until he meets a girl who ...more
MischaS_
“There must be something in books, something we can’t imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don’t stay for nothing.”

Ray Bradbury did it. He presented a world where the population is completely controlled. And it was such a simple decision. Burn!
The most frightening thing is that I could see glimpses of our society in Fahrenheit 451. And I thought about it. Are we slowly inching towards Bradbury's world?
I was left breathless by this little novel.
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Kerri
I heard that this was a great book, and I really wanted to like it. The title and the quips on the back cover caught my interest. Guy Montag is a fireman, but the job is flipped. Instead of putting out fires, he is creating them, and he likes it a lot. The first sentence, "It was a pleasure to burn", and the following description after, had me convinced that I would enjoy the book. Not only that, New York Times professes that the book is "frightening in its implications". With all that buildup a ...more
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Ray Douglas Bradbury, American novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter and poet, was born August 22, 1920 in Waukegan, Illinois. He graduated from a Los Angeles high school in 1938. Although his formal education ended there, he became a "student of life," selling newspapers on L.A. street corners from 1938 to 1942, spending his nights in the public library and his days at ...more
“Why is it," he said, one time, at the subway entrance, "I feel I've known you so many years?"
"Because I like you," she said, "and I don't want anything from you.”
4538 likes
“Stuff your eyes with wonder, he said, live as if you'd drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It's more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.” 3194 likes
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