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Tiger's Claw (Patrick McLanahan #18)

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3.86  ·  Rating details ·  1,236 Ratings  ·  99 Reviews
The fight for the Pacific begins

When China increases its naval presence in the Pacific and develops advanced weapon technology that targets American ships with lethal accuracy, it imperils American military superiority. Can the United States, in the wake of an economic recession and decreased military spending, compete with its cash-rich Chinese enemy? This question can be
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ebook, 512 pages
Published September 4th 2012 by William Morrow
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A pretty weak effort when all was said and done. Started out well, with China flexing its muscles in the South China Sea, which it claims as sovereign territory from many centuries ago. The military leadership asserts itself, using its newfound weapons on U.S. and local foes. Meanwhile, the U.S. has little military strength left, and has to rely on Patrick McLanahan's refurbished B1 bombers through private contracting. Too much technobabble, and too long. I hope #19 is better.
Dave
Oct 09, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Dale Brown used to be one of my go-to authors when I wanted to just read some mindless action/mil-thriller. But it seems that he has gone the way of Patrick Robinson. In the novel, the Chinese are stirring up trouble, throwing their weight around, and the Americans don't like it. Brown introduces some interesting ideas at the very beginning about new technologies, fancy pants EMP weapons and so on. (which the novel is named after, I think) He then proceeds to ignore these for pretty much the res ...more
Bill Wilson
Feb 23, 2013 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
My first Dale Brown book - and certainly my last. Tom Clancy without any of the redeeming qualities. I enjoy the geopolitical plot and find the military hardware descriptions interesting (to a point, and like Clancy, he often doesn't know when to stop; sometimes I felt like I was reading an inventory sheet for an Offut AFB base storeroom). But subtlety and nuance are apparently not writing tools Mr. Brown covered in his writing class after the Air Force. Most of the good guys were cartoonish one ...more
Michael
Apr 10, 2014 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I've read most of Dale Brown's books and enjoyed most of them. Some others had shortcomings, too. But after this one I won't bother anymore.

I don't mind that he killed off yet another long term protagonist. He had it coming and was simply overdue. But doing so in an afterthought like fashion?

Sorry, but *that* chap deserved a thad better.

BUT: My main struggle with this book is the horrible plot. I absolutely despise it if a writer fills his book with plots which aren't explored to the fullest ex
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Patrick
Oct 27, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Dale Brown, the author of the stellar novels Flight of the Old Dog and Hammerheads, has really started to fade. Tiger's Claw is a perfect example of a series gone on for too long, the characters are tired and the plot series is just stretching too far.

Patrick McLanahan has been through more than many characters, from nuclear holocausts to nail biting dogfights with heavy bombers. Now, with China becoming a major threat to the weakened United States he seeks to start a private air force to stave
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William Bentrim
Aug 22, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Tiger’s Claw by Dale Brown

Dale Brown plucks his plots out of newspaper headlines. This thriller postulates China as our new deadly foe. Obviously that is not much of a fictional stretch.

One of the subtleties of Brown’s books is the need to read between the lines. The book points out that with the intertwined nature of the global economy it would be difficult for any conflict to escalate to war.

Even noting that, Brown clearly details how minor events can snowball into making conflict nearly ine
...more
James
Jan 17, 2013 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I stopped reading Dale Brown because I felt he was doing formula novels. I was curious about the ripped-from-the-headline premise so I read Tigers Claw. This book starts off strong then peters out. The high tech weapons that China uses, the hacking of utilities.. Where are the consequences? How is it that every time a power goes rogue we get a coup (or two) to resolve the problem? The president is always weak or clueless.
I can live with all that if the recurring characters and cinematic fight sc
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Bob
Aug 10, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Retired Patrick McLanahan has been working with others to resurrect mothballed bombers and upgrade them with the intent of subcontracting to the government supplying planes and all personnel required to fly and support them. When the Chinese begin to rattle sabers and claim exclusive of major shipping lanes and disputed islands in the South China Sea it soon becomes apparent that the US is woefully lacking in resources to counteract the Chinese. When diplomatic efforts fail due to Chinese duplic ...more
James
Apr 07, 2015 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
The General used his XB11-73s #2 pencil to write the memo on a 23-wd_63xbc legal pad. While he was writing he made a mistake and employed a BYGT-X17-23k sythetic eraser to remove his error. Once he was finish he handed the memo to his secretary. She conscientiously transcribed the memo on her Cybervax 19-24ax_7c data entry terminal, which was fed directly into the TVM JT-721438 flux capacitor computer core.

Fudge!!! (only a different word)

This book was so focused on acronyms and model numbers tha
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Marcia
May 08, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I really liked this book. It has a lot of details about planes and aerial fighting, but the emphasis is still on the characters and the story. This book gives the background for why Brad McLanahan dropped out of the US Air Force Academy and why his attitude changed concerning his training for piloting different aircraft. The Chinese characters were especially interesting and distinct. The action is very credible, probably because of the motivations of the characters.
Thomas
May 22, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It was a very good book. I enjoyed it very much.
Carolyn
Oct 25, 2017 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I made a mistake and thought I was getting a Dan Brown and ended up with a Dale Brown. Not my kind of book!
Jim
Oct 23, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fun listen. Bradley (son) of Patrick plays a key role. Some silliness, but keep one’s attention.
F.J. Soto
Apr 26, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: giveaway
Dale Brown does not disappoint. Retired Patrick McLanahan has been working with others to resurrect mothballed bombers and upgrade them with the intent of subcontracting to the government supplying planes and all personnel required to fly and support them. When the Chinese begin to rattle sabers and claim exclusive of major shipping lanes and disputed islands in the South China Sea it soon becomes apparent that the US is woefully lacking in resources to counteract the Chinese. When diplomatic ef ...more
Dpt
Apr 23, 2015 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Don't waste your time unless you read his earlier works and need to see the main character killed off. I won't be reading another Dale Brown book.

This book puts the check marks next to what you'd expect in the genre, but it's completely lackluster writing. I felt like the book was written in a weekend and just to suit some publisher asking for a new volume.

First, unless you read one of Dale's previous books, you aren't going to understand a recurring subject in the book (American Holocaust) unti
...more
Henri Moreaux
Tiger's Claw is the 18th entry in the McLanahan series, after wavering a little earlier in the series it seems that the story line is picking back up in action and realism. This time it's a belligerent China attempting to claim the South China Sea & Spratley Islands as their own. (an exaggerated version of what they are doing right now in the real world...)

It's an entertaining read, Bradley McLanahan (Patrick's son) is featured as a large part of the story once again as he was in A Time For
...more
Brett Thomasson
May 06, 2015 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: thriller
Like Tom Clancy's "Ryanverse," Dale Brown's military-flavored thrillers are now set in a world that is similar to ours but different in key respects because of the events of earlier novels. A limited nuclear strike by a rogue Russian general has left the United States crippled militarily and economically, and there are no shortage of enemies who want to insert themselves into the vacuum of power. Chief among them, of course, is China, whose decision to aggressively expand its territorial waters ...more
Cherie
"TIGER'S CLAW imagines a scenario in which tensions escalte between an economically powerful China and a United States weakened by a massive economic downfall, bringing the two superpowers to the brink of total destruction." (blub on back of book) It starts out with China attacking a US navel vessel, but somehow made it to look like a total mistake. China thinks the US is in a very weakened state, both economically and militarily, and somehow knows that there will be no retaliation. As the story ...more
Ed Schmidt
Sep 05, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
China is strutting it's stuff in the South China Sea, downing an unarmed reconassiance plane, a rescue helicopter, and sinking an unarmed American frigate. Meanwhile, back at Battle Mountain, Nevada, Retired USAF Lt General Patrick McClanhan, now in charge of StarMasters Inc, is refurbishing and souping up formerly mothballed B1B Bombers and F111 Fighter Bombers. His intent is to rent the planes, pilots, and support crews to the US Goverment to augment it's sagging force.

As things escalate in th
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Amit Shetty

Forget US vs Russia, it's US vs China now.


A brilliant war novel and the only one that reminded me of Tom Clancy.
US and China are at war or nearing it and threatening situations on both sides of the world begins to raise fears of an all out nuclear war. And at stake is the complete dominance of the South China sea which if you do some research would basically mean its China vs The World.

The book has been written using the assumption that the reader has some sense of the military jargon of the U
...more
Read Ng
Dec 14, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: thriller
Brown has always created tales set around current events and cutting edge technology. His world is just a bit more advanced than that publicly available, but oh so credible that the military is holding equipment and weapon systems for their own use. His heroes are a bit far fetched, but that's all part of the fun.

This story is a bit long on the setup and short on action for my taste. Not to say that I was unhappy with the story. I just wish it was a bit longer. I thought there would have been gr
...more
Mike Eccles
Apr 15, 2016 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
I returned to Dale Brown having read many of his books in the past, and lacking in inspiration for an easy fiction read at bed time. I bought two in the series, this being the first of consecutive volumes. As I read I started to remember Brown's penchant for a plethora of detail, much of it jargon-based (requiring a 5 page list of weapons and acronyms before the book starts).

Action is slow - it's there but in the main in short bursts. For me this made the book rather hard work. I seemed always t
...more
Amcam
Jul 23, 2015 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: military
This was a book recommended to me by my father, who loves action/military books, especially if they have to do with planes. This was a book all about aircraft and everything they each do, very detailed in that manner. Because of the amount of detail, I was lost a fair amount of the time. Therefore, I did not really enjoy this book. If one is inclined toward aircraft, and military doings, then this would be a great book to read. I am not terribly inclined toward either of those subjects, so did n ...more
Mark Polino
Aug 25, 2012 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, 2012
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Rick
Apr 10, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: action
Finished Tiger’s Claw and it is basically the same formula for his other recent books. To me it seems as if there is 70% diplomacy and 30% action. This is a non-scientific estimate and is probably inaccurate, but that is what it seems like to me. The Chinese are the bad guys, flexing their muscles and being bad-asses. McLanahan to the rescue. His son, Brad is in the book and to me, annoying. However, Patrick is getting older and the show must go on.
To me, an abrupt ending after way too much buil
...more
Joanne
I've read all the other Dale Brown books, and in my opinion this was one of the weakest. McLanahan's son, Brad, is woven into the story, and I found it hard to like his character. The Chinese are provoking the United States using a new secret weapon, and once again, Patrick McClanahan has just the right aircraft for the job, in spite of budget cutbacks. It wasn't a book I got very invested in, although it did have a bit of a surprise ending. If you're a Dale Brown fan, though, you'll have to rea ...more
Oscar Bjorkman
Sep 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Tiger's Claw takes place in the future decade in the midst of conflict between America and China. The U.S. has suffered a massive economic downfall, while China is gradually increasing their military strength. The characters are Patrick McLanahan, Brad McLanahan, and a few other Chinese generals. My favorite part of the book was when Brad McLanahan was flying his B-1 bomber and shot down the Chinese missile defense and aircraft, because it was very intense. If you liked The First Commandment by ...more
Fredrick Danysh
The US and China fought a war. The US emerged victorious but weaker. China started developing advanced military technology and spending the money to support it. The US cut back military strength and spending as it always does following a war. Now years later, the Chinese have eyes on mineral rich areas of the South China Seas and starts flexing its muscle. Ambitious Chinese officers come up with a plan to attack and defeat the US, thus being the one world super power. Retired General Patrick McL ...more
Tom Tischler
Dale Brown has once again written one of his wartime scenario's.
This one is set slightly into the future and an economically
powerful China is pushing an economically weakened U.S. This
is going to bring too powerful super powers to the brink of
total destruction. Retired Lt.General Patrick McLanahan is back
and he is preparing for this impending clash of military
technology. This is book eighteen in the McLanahan series and
if you enjoyed the others you will like this one.
Ken Durham
Dec 09, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Dale looks at the new threat to the USA flag. What most people don't realize is that China in its own soft and quiet way has already wormed its way into the USA society. Its military strength is far great then the USA and has been for many years. The difference is the USA boldly goes out and does it, to keep us safe, while China sits back. In the book I was sad to see Patrick die, but look forward to the development of hs sons character.
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Former U.S. Air Force captain Dale Brown is the superstar author of 25 consecutive New York Times best-selling military-action-aviation adventure novels: FLIGHT OF THE OLD DOG (1987), SILVER TOWER (1988), DAY OF THE CHEETAH (1989), HAMMERHEADS (1990), SKY MASTERS (1991), NIGHT OF THE HAWK (1992), CHAINS OF COMMAND (1993), STORMING HEAVEN (1994), SHADOWS OF STEEL (1996) and FATAL TERRAIN (1997), TH ...more
More about Dale Brown...

Other Books in the Series

Patrick McLanahan (1 - 10 of 21 books)
  • Flight of the Old Dog (Patrick McLanahan, #1)
  • Night of the Hawk (Patrick McLanahan, #2)
  • Sky Masters (Patrick McLanahan, #3)
  • Day of the Cheetah (Patrick McLanahan, #4)
  • Shadows of Steel (Patrick McLanahan, #5)
  • Fatal Terrain (Patrick McLanahan, #6)
  • The Tin Man (Patrick McLanahan, #7)
  • Battle Born (Patrick McLanahan, #8)
  • Warrior Class (Patrick McLanahan, #9)
  • Wings of Fire (Patrick McLanahan, #10)
“THE SIMMERING STRATEGIC CLASH IN U.S.-CHINA RELATIONS—(Stratfor.com, January 20, 2011): . . . Beijing is compelled by its economic development to seek military tools to secure its vital supply lines and defend its coasts, the historic weak point where foreign states have invaded. With each Chinese move to push out from its narrow geographical confines, the United States perceives a military force gaining in ability to block or interfere with U.S. commercial and military passage and access in the region. This violates a core American strategic need—command of the seas and global reach.” 0 likes
“Fox three, Brewski!” Jimmy Maili shouted on the command channel. All four Chinese fighters were locked on solid on his APG-77 radar, and the fire control computer had selected the best targets. With the press of a button, the left main weapon bay door opened and an AIM-120D AMRAAM was ejected into the slipstream and homed in on its target, followed a few seconds later by another from the right-side weapons bay. He could see tiny sparkles in the distance and assumed it was the Chinese pilots ejecting flares when they got the missile launch warning.” 0 likes
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