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Wyrd Sisters

(Discworld #6)

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  81,233 ratings  ·  2,627 reviews
Things like crowns had a troublesome effect on clever folks; it was best to leave all the reigning to the kind of people whose eyebrows met in the middle.

Three witches gathered on a lonely heath. A king cruelly murdered, his throne usurped by his ambitious cousin. A child heir and the crown of the kingdom, both missing…

Witches don't have these kind of dynastic problems the
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Paperback, 368 pages
Published October 11th 2012 by Corgi (first published November 10th 1988)
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Anne Beardsley I always recommend Going Postal first. It's a wonderful intro to the world, and a wonderful stand-alone.

But like they say, you can probably read most…more
I always recommend Going Postal first. It's a wonderful intro to the world, and a wonderful stand-alone.

But like they say, you can probably read most Pratchett books in any order.(less)
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Community Reviews

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4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  81,233 ratings  ·  2,627 reviews


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Leslie
Apr 03, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
How have I never read Terry Pratchett before? He's like ... Shakespeare and Wodehouse and Monty Python all wrapped into one!

A student gave me this book while we were studying Macbeth in class. Wyrd Sisters is a sort of parallel story, which manages to poke fun at the play, revere the play, make inside jokes about the play, and ... well, generally turn the play on its head. All the while, you, the reader, get to feel very smart and superior for getting all the jokes and allusions.

And yet it manag
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Lyn
Dec 25, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shakespeare on the Discworld.

Truth be told, and all due respect to Rincewind, but I am partial to Sir Terry’s Discworld Witches.

Granny Weatherwax returns from Equal Rites to star in another novel, this time in Pratchett’s 1988 entry into the Discworld universe, Wyrd Sisters, his sixth Discworld novel and the second to feature Weatherwax and her sister witches.

Nanny Ogg gives her a run for her money though.

Pratchett provides Granny Weatherwax with a return visit and introduces two of her sisters
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Melki
Jul 30, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I know the wizards have their fans, but for my money, NOBODY beats the Discworld witches.

Granny Weatherwax and her "cronies" try to dethrone an undesirable king in this adventure. To do it they'll need to mess around with time and even consort with...actors - gasp!

Here the gals summon a demon, with predictably Pratchett-like results:

The waters seethed a little, became very still and then, with a sudden movement and a little popping noise, mounded up into a head.
"Well?" it said.
"Who're you?" said
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Ahmad Sharabiani
Wyrd Sisters (Discworld, #6; Witches #2), Terry Pratchett
Wyrd Sisters is Terry Pratchett's sixth Discworld novel, published in 1988, and re-introduces Granny Weatherwax of Equal Rites. Wyrd Sisters features three witches: Granny Weatherwax; Nanny Ogg, matriarch of a large tribe of Oggs and owner of the most evil cat in the world; and Magrat Garlick, the junior witch, who firmly believes in occult jewelry, covens, and bubbling cauldrons, much to the annoyance of the other two. King Verence I of L
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Trish
Oct 08, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
What a funny coincidence that my group started the Discworld buddy-read at a time that meant this 6th installment would be read in October of all months. How utterly appropriate.

And I have a confession to make: I think I have a new favourite. O.O
So far, my absolute favourite was Mort and it still is fantastic, but this book is at least equally great. There might not be deep messages about mortality, but the plot in Wyrd Sisters has a lot of other important topics to offer.

The story is that of ho
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Charlotte May
"When you break rules, break 'em good and hard."

Hm. I must admit I wasn't as taken with this one as I was with Mort.
Terry Pratchett's insatiable wit was still there, but I just wasn't as invested in this story.
Three witches - Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and young Magrat keep to their own little coven and rarely meddle in other affairs.
But when three knights appear carrying a baby off into the woods they become suspicious, and decide to get involved.

"I reckon responsible behaviour is somethi
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Bradley
Mar 26, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy
There have been many great reviews on this old favorite of Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld, and I won't wax eloquent, (or otherwise), save to mention that it's full of Headology and Shakespeare references, between murdered kings and lost heirs and crowns and a mummer's farce and a showdown between Witches and the King, but even so, it's all fun as hell.

I think this is the first novel of the Discworld series that truly comes into its own... or the first one that Pratchett uses as the template for
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Joey Woolfardis
[First Read: 7th March, 2013. 3 stars.
Second Read: 5th October, 2018. 3 stars.]

Wyrd Sisters is the second of the Witch mini-series, in the ever popular Discworld series. Equal Rites was the first and we were introduced to one of the greatest characters of all-time: Granny Weatherwax.

Wyrd Sisters brings two more witches-and mentions of many others-in to fray: Nanny Ogg, Granny's best friend, and Magrat Garlick, a new-wave witch who thinks jangling jewellery and occult symbols makes you a better w
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Brent
Jul 23, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: humor, fantasy
So much fun.
BrokenTune
May 08, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: reviewed
As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: ‘When shall we three meet again?’ There was a pause. Finally another voice said, in far more ordinary tones: ‘Well, I can do next Tuesday.’

I just realised that I never finished writing a review for this one even though I absolutely loved it. Wyrd Sisters is the second installment of the Witches sub-series, and is Pratchett's version of what would happen if Hamlet and Macbeth had been set in the Discworld universe - which may just give you an id
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Luffy
Oct 07, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The late Terry Pratchett was a hell of a writer. I thought one of my other favorite Fantasy authors, Brandon Sanderson, was barking up the wrong tree when he lauded Pratchett as a genius.

But, I realize now better not to distrust those in the know. It is clear to me that the author of Wyrd Sisters is a master of literature, with this book to prove it. A very great first half leading to a less than perfect second half makes me look forward to the Discworld books. It's queer how the first half em
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Veronique
Nov 22, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: stars-4-0, 2017
“It is true that words have power, and one of the things they are able to do is get out of someone’s mouth before the speaker has the chance to stop them.”

Granny Weatherwax is back! Our favourite witch is brought to the scene when a baby is dropped at her feet leading her and her covent sisters, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick, to deal with the death of a monarch and his rightful succession. All this of course involves a lot more than was first thought, with the kingdom in disarray due to the ‘usu
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Lorenzio Phillibuster Fireworks
After reading three rather lackluster books in a row I was feeling rather down about the world of reading. Then I read the first sentence of Wyrd Sisters. I entered the world of witches, Shakespearean plots and a novel full of Terry Pratchett's wonderful, quirky sense of humour.
As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: 'When shall we three meet again?'
There was a pause.
Finally another voice said, in a far more ordinary tones: 'Well, I can do next Tuesday.'
pg 1.

I think my favourit
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Vicky N.
Jul 02, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Rating: 4.5 stars

Wyrd Sisters is the sixth book in the Discworld series, a series known for it's many books and trickiness into deciding its reading order.

I found Wyrd Sisters a perfectly good introduction into the world. It is a fun and light hearted book involving witches, kings and magic.

It is a parody of the genre and it is gloriously entertaining and such a soothing change of pace from your typical fantasy novel.

Nobody takes themselves seriously in this book. The witches know what you exp
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Susanna - Censored by GoodReads
Hamlet and MacBeth had a baby, and it was a comedy.

3.5 stars.
Ivan
Sep 20, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I am warming up to Witches but so far City Watch is still my favorite Discworld series.
Audrey
3.5 stars

This is the second book with Granny Weatherwax, though it’s not necessary to read the first. She has two witch friends. Meanwhile there are ghosts, regicide, a traveling troupe of actors, and a very awkward romance involving one of the witches.

There’s a strong plot here compared to much of Discworld. Overall it’s a parody of Shakespeare, particularly Macbeth and Hamlet. The humor is heavy on puns. It’s a fine addition to the Discworld collection and a fun book that meets all expectation
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Obsidian
I really don't enjoy reading books out of order, but since this was our buddy read for Halloween bingo, I didn't have a choice this time. The Color of Magic is sitting on my bookshelves and I hope I will be able to read it for the next 16 Festive Tasks. Or just whenever this year. If you want to read a non-scary book about witches, this one is for you. I cracked up a lot reading about witches in this world (Discworld) and how three witches get involved after a king (King Verence I of Lancre) is ...more
Rob
Executive Summary: Started slow, but the second half kind of made up for the first half. And very quotable as always. 3.5 Stars.

Full Review
Well I made it! I did 5 Discworld books in the last few months. I was able to read this book in April for Sword and Laser without having to skip any books.

It's not my favorite of the bunch, but I definitely enjoyed it more than I did Sourcery. I think I might have enjoyed Equal Rites more though. I was warned that Granny Weatherwax was a bit different in th
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WhiskeyintheJar/Kyraryker
3.5 stars

I read this for the Free Space for Halloween Bingo

She gave the guards a nod as she went through. It didn’t occur to either of them to stop her because witches, like beekeepers and big gorillas, went where they liked.

Part of the Discworld but also the Witches series, Granny, Nanny, and Magrat run and steal the show. I would describe this as kind of a Monty Python take on Macbeth and Hamlet (with a little bit of King Lear, Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, and probably splashes of mor
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Linda
Nov 23, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2017
This might be my favorite Discworld so far!
Leah
May 01, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: comic, fantasy
If the idiots of the world aren't careful, they'll find themselves being educated without knowing it. Reading Pratchett is like reading something written by someone who finds pretty much everything interesting, and wants to share it with you without condescending or being preachy. Oh, wait...

Here he tackles Macbeth in particular, and the power of the written and spoken word in general. How he manages to take something as epic and classic as Macbeth and simultaneously mock it and pay homage to it
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Toby
May 16, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Pure entertainment from start to finish. Nanny Ogg is so similar to my own grandmother that I am drawn to her character first before the more famous Granny Wetherwax despite this being the grand dame of headology's first appearance as we would come to know her after the character exploration of Equal Rites. Taking two months away from reading and reviewing has really taken its toll, I can barely think of a thing to say. It doesn't matter though, this one has stood the test of time and in posteri ...more
Cora Tea Party Princess
I love this trio of witches.

Terry Pratchett has done it again - another fantastic tale of the Discworld.

The plot is hilarious and the characters even more so. But still there's a thread of romance, a sweet little side story.

This story has heart.
Karen ⊰✿
Nov 09, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: wheelathon3
This is the second book in the Witches sub-series of Discworld. Here we are introduced to three witches who decided it may be a good idea to start a coven - Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Magrat. They don't really know why a coven is necessary, but it seemed like a good idea at the time.

When the king is murdered (which according to the witches is just an occupational hazard), they reluctantly get caught up in town matters and politics ; and there is even a spot of romance for young Magrat.

Thi
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David Sarkies
Oct 25, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who want a bit of a laugh
Recommended to David by: Stewart Wymer
Shelves: comedy
Pratchett takes a jab at Shakespeare's classics
31 October 2012

Well, here I am writing a commentary on Wyrd Sisters on Halloween. Okay, this book isn't about Halloween, but the three main characters are witches, and there are a lot of ghosts in this book as well, so it seems that it is quite ironic that I am writing about it now. Not that I particularly subscribe to Halloween though, since it is an American holiday, though that is a bit of a technicality since it is really only in America that i
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Josh
Feb 07, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
The first in the series to really frustrate me. Maybe I wasn’t in the right mind to read this book, maybe Pratchett’s style has evolved beyond what I enjoy. I understand this is one of the more well regarded Discworld novels, but I struggled to even pick it up. I appreciated the nods to Shakespeare, and some of the moments between Hwel and Tomjon were enjoyable, but I mostly disliked this. Here’s hoping Guards Guards is a better read... I’ll be taking a break from Discworld for awhile.
Siria
Wyrd Sisters was the very first Discworld novel that I ever read, back at the tender age of eight. A friend of mine got it as a present from her father. Like his previous gift of the collected novels of Jane Austen, this wasn't received with much enthusiasm. She tossed it over to me on one of our monthly 'let's raid one another's bookcases' events. I was intrigued by the slightly cartoony, slightly grotesque style of Josh Kirby's cover art, and took it away with me.

I read the whole thing in abou
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Marina
Sep 08, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 4-star, own
The second instalment of the the Witches series of Discworld is utterly hilarious, punny, and a giant nod to Shakespeare's Macbeth and other plays.

I really love all the characters, but of course the Witches are my favorite. I love how at first glance they appear to he caricatures of the witches that we usually see in literature, but at the same time they are so well defined that they are very much their own characters. They own it. Plus, throw in Pratchett's humor and you have a recipe for great
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Dusty
Dec 31, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2008
Monty Python meets Macbeth? Wyrd Sisters was my first foray into Pratchett's pulpy, popular Discword series, and, although I liked it ... I didn't quite love it. It was certainly a clever book -- I appreciated the offhand Shakespeare references -- but it felt rough around the edges to me, like Pratchett sent his manuscript off for publishing one draft too soon. It needs revising. Some paragraphs I reread several times, and not because they were challenging but because they barely made sense.

Any
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31,788 followers
Born Terence David John Pratchett, Sir Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was thirteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe.

Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, i
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Other books in the series

Discworld (1 - 10 of 42 books)
  • The Color of Magic (Discworld, #1; Rincewind, #1)
  • The Light Fantastic (Discworld, #2; Rincewind #2)
  • Equal Rites (Discworld, #3; Witches, #1)
  • Mort (Death, #1; Discworld, #4)
  • Sourcery (Discworld, #5; Rincewind #3)
  • Pyramids (Discworld, #7)
  • Guards! Guards! (Discworld, #8; City Watch #1)
  • Eric (Discworld, #9; Rincewind #4)
  • Moving Pictures (Discworld, #10; Industrial Revolution, #1)
  • Reaper Man (Discworld, #11; Death, #2)
“This book was written using 100% recycled words.” 873 likes
“Only in our dreams are we free. The rest of the time we need wages.” 415 likes
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