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Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond
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Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond

3.43  ·  Rating details ·  1,685 Ratings  ·  277 Reviews
Fans of the show Mad Men are dying to know how accurate it is. Was there really that much sex at the office? Were there really three-martini lunches? Were women really second-class citizens? Jane Maas says the answer to all three questions is unequivocally "yes." Her book Mad Women, based on her own experiences and countless interviews with her peers, is a fascinating tell ...more
Paperback, 240 pages
Published January 29th 2013 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published February 28th 2012)
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Beth
Jul 21, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: listened
I will keep my stance that the narrarators sharp, quick, clipped, sometimes snooty vocal cadence wore me out while listening to this book. She veers away from the advertising profession and travels down equal rights alleys, and seems to get lost in those alleys.

Maas does a good job of comparing and contrasting her real world 1960's advertising experience to what we see on Mad Men. I can get a flavor for what goes on at Sterling, Cooper, Draper, Pryce or the previous Sterling Cooper was realistic
...more
Marla
Jul 21, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I listened to the audiobook and it was really good. The reader had a very silky voice that could put you to sleep. It was interesting to hear the woman's perspective of the Mad Men Show and how it was in advertising in the 60's. We've really come a long way over the last 50 years.
Tammie
Nov 26, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It took me a long time to get around to watching Mad Men. After 3 weeks of watching at a near addicting pace (Jon Hamm, late nights...sigh)I finished it and experienced a severe case of withdrawal. I need more! Where is season 5, Netflix?!?!?!

Last Tuesday I was browsing through the library and this book reached out and grabbed me! I had to read it, I had to feed this Mad craving for everything having to do with Mad Men!!!

I loved it! I appreciate Jane's realness. She's a careerwoman, a wife and m
...more
Jane Roper
As a copywriter myself, not to mention a fan of Mad Men, I was really excited to read this book. But I didn't end up finishing it because I just wasn't compelled to do so. The problem for me was that it wasn't really a memoir, just a collection -- in no specific order, just thematically grouped -- of reflections and anecdotes. It's well written enough, and provides some interesting glimpses of what things were like in the 60s for women both in the workplace and at home. But there is no narrative ...more
Jessi Lee Gaylord
Mad Women: What the fuck do you mean “sexual harassment” didn’t exist yet?

I was counting down the days until the new season of Mad Men with my panties in a bunch, when I picked up the book Mad Women by Jane Maas. Maas was both a copywriter and a creative director at Ogilvy & Mather in the penis-slinging hustle of the New York advertising world in the 1960s. The book articulates the agony of ecstasy of a career woman in the misogynistic though mesmerizing world of advertising, but readers, w
...more
Vida
Apr 21, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I thought Mad Women was many things. It was a history lesson, it was a reminder of the advertising campaigns of my youth, it was philosophical, it was a story of the women's working world that I missed by staying home to raise my children, it was entertaining. I couldn't put it down.

After graduating college, I dreamed of being a professional advertising woman. This was like being voyeur in Jane Maas' life.

I appreciated her philosophizing, "Edes Gilbert connects the increasing guild of working mo
...more
Bunny
Jul 04, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-14
I'm disappointed that there are so few reviews of this book on GoodReads. I was utterly charmed by it.

I love advertising. I think I always have, without realizing it. I vividly remember the first commercial that stuck with me. For those who remember it, all I need to say is, "Cha-ching!"

Who knew that almost 20 years later, I was going to be madly in love with that guy when he played a guitar-playing werewolf.

This book was never boring. I learned more about old ad campaigns, and it only added to
...more
Riley
Aug 31, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
3.5/5
Stephanie
Mar 20, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: adult-nonfiction
Hands down the most disappointing book I have read of 2012. I haven't been this bored with an author in a long time.

I knew who Jane Maas was thanks to the requisite advertising class in my MBA program. Famous for the I Love NY campaign, she is a pioneer in advertising. She worked for David Ogilvy in the 1960s when the ad world was made up of men. Not only was she an account bigwig, she was a working mother. Something almost unheard of in that period.

Maas has the background to weave an interestin
...more
Mary Mckenna longford
Jane Maas wore me out with her "Egocentric and I was such a pioneer" prose. I found some of her account of life as a working mother in the '60's interesting but it was all too self congratulatory and self indulgent for my liking. She's derisory at times about women who chose to leave the workforce and raise their children themselves rather than have a stranger do it as if women who chose the second path were trail blazers, too clever to be concerned with domestic responsibilities. Newsflash Jane ...more
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“Late one night, an account man was having sex with his secretary. He was fairly junior, so his inside office didn't have a door, and the big boss happened to be working late and caught them. The result: the account guy was promoted and got an office with a door; the secretary was fired.” 3 likes
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