Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “There Is No Me Without You: One Womens Odyssey To Rescue Her Countrys Children” as Want to Read:
Blank 133x176
There Is No Me Without...
 
by
Melissa Fay Greene
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

There Is No Me Without You: One Womens Odyssey To Rescue Her Countrys Children

4.26  ·  Rating details ·  2,899 Ratings  ·  395 Reviews
"When Haregewoin Teferra's husband and twenty-three-year-old daughter died within a few years of each other, her middle-class life in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, was shattered. Bereft and with little to live for, Haregewoin became a recluse. Her self-imposed exile was interrupted when a priest delivered first one, then another, orphaned child into her care. To everyone's surpri ...more
Kindle Edition
Published by Bloomsbury USA (first published 2006)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about There Is No Me Without You, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about There Is No Me Without You

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-10)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Saleh MoonWalker
Onvan : There Is No Me Without You: One Woman's Odyssey to Rescue Africa's Children - Nevisande : Melissa Fay Greene - ISBN : 1596911166 - ISBN13 : 9781596911161 - Dar 472 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 2006
Chrissie
Feb 01, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: bio, medical, ethiopia
NO SPOILERS

Having completed the book, here are my thoughts. Everybody should read this book. When you say millions of AIDS orphans, it doesn't really mean anything. When you come to know a few, their thoughts, their experiences, their fears and dreams, the numbers take on a face and they mean something. It is much better to understand one individual in depth than millions without faces.

You fall in love with some of these children. Most parents wanted to adopt baby girls. Do you know who were wi
...more
Alicia
Sep 09, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: dik
This is the book that is causing me to rethink my life and try to decide if I am living a meaningful life. Am I doing enough good or should I sell my possessions, move to Africa or India and dedicate my life to something more useful than having a socially conscious job and owning a home.

Haregewoin Teferra was a middle class woman in Ethiopia, a professional woman with an husband who was a teacher and two beautiful and beloved daughters. After her husband passes away she raises her daughters to a
...more
Marci
Mar 05, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
Shelves: favoritebooks
This book really taught me a lot both intellectually and personally. It taught me that I haven't the first clue about poverty, the orphan crisis, about Africa and about AIDS. The author writes in a journalistic style about a current day Ethiopian woman who after the death of her husband and later her daughter decides to enter a life of hermitude. As she goes to say her good byes to a priest friend he asks her to take in a street girl and care for her. She reluctantly says yes. With in a few mont ...more
Caroline
Feb 23, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
To be honest I found a lot of the writing a bit too speculative - telling us about how children felt, when the author was not there, let alone in the mind of the child concerned. But that is only a minor quibble. This is an amazing story about an amazing Ethiopian woman - Haregewoin Teferra - who took lots of children orphaned by AIDS, into her home.

I very much like the way the author interspersed the story with theories about how AIDS may have come into being, and the fantastic politics of the
...more
Joanne
After reading Melissa Fay Greene's funny No Biking in the House Without a Helmet, I picked up this earlier book about the woman who runs the orphanage from which some of Green's children came. Somehow I missed it when it came out, despite its winning a slew of awards that year. It is a powerful book, and it took me a long time to finish it because I needed time to absorb its impact. The book is not maudlin nor manipulative, but its subject, AIDS orphans, is tragic.

Greene is an excellent writer,
...more
Megan
Aug 24, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: bookgroup
I wasn't anticipating the emotional journey this book would take me on. I've been sad, angry, happy, bereft, indignant, heartbroken, despairing, hopeful, and just about every other emotion you can imagine while I've been reading it.
I'm so moved by the true-life heroine of this book, Haregewoin Teferra who turned her grief after losing her husband and a daughter into a mission to rescue as many of the thousands of AIDS orphans in Ethiopia as she could handle, and then some. The author doesn't pai
...more
Christy
This is an eye-opening book about AIDS orphans in Ethiopia. Melissa Fay Greene particularly focuses on the efforts of one woman who cares for those orphans. Haregewoin Teferra was one of the few refuges for AIDS orphans in the earlier days of the pandemic. Greene's tale doesn't seek to make Haregewoin into a saint, but shows her in all her courage and also her limited ability to handle the incredible task she takes on. When the Western world begins to laud Haregewoin for her deeds, Greene also s ...more
Laurel
Mar 17, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
Much like Half the Sky, this was one of those books I often found myself wishing everyone would read. Briefly speaking, in There is No Me Without You, journalist Melissa Fay Greene explores the history of HIV/AIDS, the subsequent plight in Africa (more specifically, Ethiopia), and how one woman reached out and tried to bring about change. Insightful, educational and inspiring.
Eileen Souza
Jun 08, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: africa, adoption
This is one of the most profound, informative, and life-altering books that I have ever read. If I could give it six stars, I would.

I started reading this book because I’m a prospective adoptive parent, looking to adopt from Ethiopia. I could not have picked a better book to explain the history and reality of HIV as well as the impact on the children of Ethiopia.

This non-fiction work is a story told in two parts. The first aspect of the book covers the history of the development of HIV/AIDS, how
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • Love in the Driest Season: A Family Memoir
  • The Hospital by the River
  • In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories
  • My Fathers' Daughter
  • Parenting Your Internationally Adopted Child: From Your First Hours Together Through the Teen Years
  • Notes from the Hyena's Belly: An Ethiopian Boyhood
  • The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family
  • Outsiders Within: Writing on Transracial Adoption
  • I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World
  • 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa
  • Attaching in Adoption: Practical Tools for Today's Parents
  • Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village
  • Scared (On the Edge of the World #1)
  • House of Stone: The True Story of a Family Divided in War-Torn Zimbabwe
  • Toddler Adoption: The Weaver's Craft
  • Fields of the Fatherless: Discover the Joy of Compassionate Living
  • Held at a Distance: My Rediscovery of Ethiopia
  • The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking, and the New Gospel of Adoption
69415
Melissa Greene has been a contributor to NPR, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, LIFE, Good Housekeeping, Newsweek, The Atlantic, Readers Digest, Ms., The Wilson Quarterly, Redbook, and Salon.com. She lives in Atlanta with her husband, Don Samuel, a criminal defense attorney. They have been married for 28 years and are the parents of nine children: Molly, Seth, Lee, Lily, Jesse (adopted ...more
More about Melissa Fay Greene...
“So how does it happen that -- while most people instinctively try to save themselves and their families from a catastrophe -- a few slow down, look back, and suddenly reach out to strangers? Instead of fleeing in the opposite direction, a few wade into the rising waters to try to yank the drowning onto higher land. ... In the coming months and years, I would learn that -- just as there is no blood test to identify who will jump into the fray -- there is no simple biographical arc either. No resume can predict why this man or woman, at a safe remove from crisis, suddenly announces, "This is my fight.” 3 likes
“In the Pirkei Avoth, the Jewish ethical compendium from the third century, it is written, "In a place with no people, try to be a person" (2:6).” 0 likes
More quotes…