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The Boy Who Loved Apples
 
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Amanda Webster
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The Boy Who Loved Apples

3.79  ·  Rating details ·  196 ratings  ·  24 reviews
Brave, honest and ultimately uplifting, The Boy Who Loved Apples is a compelling and beautifully written account of life with an eating disorder, and a gritty, moving testament to a mother’s love.

When it became clear that Amanda Webster’s eleven-year-old son Riche was not just a little too skinny but dangerously ill, people were often surprised. Do boys get anorexia? they
...more
Published (first published January 1st 2012)
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Average rating 3.79  · 
Rating details
 ·  196 ratings  ·  24 reviews


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Miz
What an amazing book. Amanda Webster was a doctor who gave up her career to run her household, look after her three children and her two parents. Her high-flying husband (Kevin) commuted almost 800km each week in order to spend weekends with his family. Based in Australia this books should be on everyone’s reading lists.

Tragedy strikes when Amanda and Kevin's oldest, Riche, suffers from anorexia and this is Amanda's heart wrenching journey from bringing him back from near death.

Riche was only 1
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Liralen
As the subtitle indicates, this is a woman's account of helping her son through the worst of his anorexia. I didn't realise until I started the book just how young he was—still a child, not yet a teenager. And it's fascinating for that: we're seeing anorexia through the eyes of an adult who has some idea what's going on in her son's head, but not a total idea; it's a slow and painful process for her to understand how best to treat her son and how to get through to him.

There were a few things tha
...more
Karlsefine Kaffee
Apr 20, 2021 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Beeindruckende, ehrliche und überraschende Familiengeschichte. Man merkt, dass hier eine Mutter und keine Autorin schreibt, aber das macht es meiner Meinung nach auch berührend 'echt'. ...more
Margaret Prentice
Apr 22, 2018 rated it it was amazing
A great read, I felt like I have stepped into their lives for a heartbreaking period of madness. I can not begin 6o understand hoe lonely this period must have felt for each individual family member. A true insight into what is a horrible disease.
Merel Maas
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Dina Davis
Jan 16, 2020 rated it really liked it
A new twist on seeing anorexia nervosa from the mother’s POV. Striking that the boy sufferer is never blamed for his illness, as so many have been. An enlightening read.
Tarifa Versteeg
Sep 23, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
3,5 stars
Chloe-Louise Finch
May 29, 2017 rated it it was amazing
This book was Published in 2014. This book is 304 pages long.
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Amanda graduated from the University as a doctor,
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following in the footsteps of her father and grandfather.
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She left medicine to raise a family with her husband, Kevin.
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Amanda was a doctor who gave up her career to run her household, looking after her three children and her two parents.
.
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Her high-flying husband travels almost 800km each week in order to spend weekends with his family.
.
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this is Amanda's heart wrenching journ
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Julie
Aug 27, 2012 rated it really liked it
I stared at this one on my book pile for two weeks before I decided to pick it up, and I am glad I did. The author Amanda Webster is a mum of three in coastal Australia. With a husband who commutes during the week to a high paid job in Sydney, she also finds herself caring for her elderly parents, including her mother, who is left disabled after a brain aneurysm.

A retired doctor herself, she starts to notice some odd behaviour patterns in her eldest son Riche, with some obsessive compulsive pat
...more
Jenny Hayworth
Jan 02, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I learnt so much about anorexia but more importantly I so related to the mothers descriptions of trying to maintain normality in life when trying to deal with an out of the ordinary and ongoing traumatic situation. A baffling disorder. A beautifully written book I am glad I read. An amazing documentation of this families struggle and survival and triumph through often harrowing times. I am in awe. I love the first person narrative used strongly throughout most of the book as I felt often I was i ...more
Ruby
Jun 25, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Surely, there could be nothing more harrowing than being the parent of a seriously ill child. What an eye opening book this is! Amanda and her family were so brave to share their story of a child with severe mental illness (anorexia). I guess it seems like a slightly morbid topic for a book, but I heard Amanda interviewed on the radio and she was just such an engaging interviewee, I had to read the book. I feel like I learned a lot. I remembered afresh how lucky I am that my boy is healthy. I wa ...more
Heather Browning
One thing I find really interesting about these accounts of anorexia is how they show how closely linked it seems to be with OCD - the uncontrollable thoughts and fears that lead to particular behaviours meant to control it. Although I didn't find that I particularly liked the author through most of the story, I certainly felt for what she was going through, and her struggle to find appropriate treatment. It seems that in the few years since this was published, the new treatment methods she even ...more
Marie Carlino
Sep 14, 2012 rated it liked it
This book really highlighted the extremes of anorexia. The idea of calorie transfer from seeing it on TV is something I hadn't heard of before. It is sad how much the disease can ruin not only the life of the sufferer but friends and family as well.

I strongly recommend this book to anyone who is undertaking research in the area of anorexia or knows someone who is suffering. It is very different to other books I have read.
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Nicky
Jul 23, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Een jongen met anorexia, ik wist wel dat het bestond,
Maar had er nog nooit iets over gelezen.
Het boek was reuze interessant, en ik kon het daarom snel uitlezen.
De schrijfstijl (of de vertaling) vond ik soms wat storend, maar door het boeiende onderwerp, heeft dat me niet zo gestoord dat ik gestopt ben met lezen...
Heidi Boer
Jan 17, 2016 rated it really liked it
Wow, what a brutally honest and emotionally exhausting read. I cried tears of sadness, desperation, happiness and gobbled this book up in 24 hours because I couldn't sleep until I knew the outcome of Riche and his family. Amanda Webster did a fantastic job at capturing the raw emotions- I would highly recommend anyone to read this. ...more
Hayley Forrest
Jan 15, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: i-own-this
I definitely recommend it to health professionals, as an informative and interesting insight. But just generally it was an enjoyable read. Well structured and the story flowed nicely. A pleasure. Would've liked to know more about Andy and Louise at the end but still. ...more
Bianca
Jan 05, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Heartbreakingly honest story about a beautiful young boy's battle with anorexia. Was completely absorbed in it, willing him to be well. Thankfully, for him & his family, he did. ...more
Ilse
Jul 04, 2015 rated it really liked it
3.5 star
Claire
Apr 09, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A mother's memoir that is really a family's memoir focused in on the heart-wrenching fight for survival between mother and son. Gripping, horrifying, and (thank God) redeeming in the end. ...more
Liz
Jan 14, 2015 rated it it was amazing
An excellent book written by a mother about her son's experience with anorexia. ...more
Nikki
Sep 20, 2014 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Ik had meer van dit boek verwacht. Helaas. Het was voor mij te langdradig, te herhalend. Dit boek kon geschreven worden in 100 pagina's. Ik heb er niet veel nieuws uit kunnen halen. ...more
Andrew McMillen
Oct 02, 2012 rated it liked it
Reviewed for The Australian. Not something I’d usually go for, but very glad I read it.
Bec
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Cimara
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Jan 08, 2018
Roz Hopkins
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Nov 30, 2013
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Chris Coster
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Mark French
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Fiona Mackie
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Apr 02, 2014
Kara
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