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From the Closet to the Altar: Courts, Backlash, and the Struggle for Same-Sex Marriage

3.74  ·  Rating details ·  43 ratings  ·  5 reviews
Same-sex marriage has become one of the most volatile issues in American politics. But if most young people support gay marriage, and if there are clear indicators that a substantial majority of the population will soon favor it, why has the outcry against it been so strong?
Hardcover, 1st, 288 pages
Published October 5th 2012 by Oxford University Press (first published September 7th 2012)
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3.74  · 
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 ·  43 ratings  ·  5 reviews


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Dusty
Jan 03, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2015
I picked up From the Closet to the Altar directly after I put down We Do!: American Leaders Who Supported Marriage Equality, and the two books made for intriguing bedfellows. They both recall the struggle for LGBTQ rights, tracing the path it has taken from the radical activism of the Stonewall rioters and Harvey Milk through the recent and fairly mainstream push for the national legalization of same-sex marriage. But their approaches are very different. We Do! assembles a series of political sp ...more
John Suddath
If you like the detailed history of court cases, legal strategies, and politics, then this books gives the most comprehensive review of this issue. If you are not a lawyer or gay, this may be more than you ever wanted to know. It summarizes the snow-ball effect of the decisions of the various courts, and it demonstrates how quickly this social issue evolved. It happened much quicker than the civil rights actions of the 1960's because it focused more on the courts than the Congress or the state l ...more
Nelson
May 28, 2013 rated it really liked it
Very illuminating legal (and political) history of the same-sex marriage movement in the US. The book is also wonderfully engaging...
Bonnie Tesch
Jul 29, 2015 rated it it was ok
This was way too heavy on statistics (particularly from opinion polls), and pretty bad at sticking to a timeline for something as data heavy as it was. Would not recommend.
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An American legal historian, and constitutional law scholar, Michael Klarman is the Kirkland & Ellis Professor at Harvard Law School.