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How to Write a Script With Dialogue That Doesn't Suck
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How to Write a Script With Dialogue That Doesn't Suck

(ScriptBully Books #4)

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4.16  ·  Rating details ·  62 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Want to know how to write a script that people will remember, and can catch the attention of producers and other above-the-line talent? (Don’t worry about agents; they don’t want to talk to you.

Nail your dialogue.

Really.

Now I know you’ve heard all the maxims:

• Film is a Visual Medium
• You Can Either Write Dialogue Or You Can’t

And they both sound very logical. And esteemed
...more
Kindle Edition, 75 pages
Published May 15th 2012 by Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
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4.16  · 
Rating details
 ·  62 ratings  ·  4 reviews


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K.M. Weiland
Apr 06, 2015 rated it it was amazing
This is a really great little guide, full of punchy and easily actionable suggestions. Some more examples from great scripts wouldn't have gone amiss, but, as it is, it's a fast read that offers something of value on pretty much every page.
Laura Roberts
Nov 30, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2012, nonfiction, writing
As Rogan notes, while it's hard to become a master of dialogue, it's NOT all that hard to become decent at it. In fact, "All you gotta do is have your dialogue be 'fun' for actors to say."

Brilliant!

Now... how do you do that?

Rogan explains that characters very rarely say what they're actually thinking, so learning how to dance around the truth of a scene is the best thing to do. One of his exercises asks you to figure out what's the most important point of the scene, and then make VERY, VERY sure
...more
L.M. Bennett
Apr 21, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: favs
This book taught me a lot of things that I repeat verbatim when discussing dialogue. Rogan has very simple but effective ways to keep scenes lively and interesting between characters. It's short, but it's a gem.
E. T. Brother
Jun 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Good read
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ScriptBully Books (5 books)
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