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The Return of the Indian

(The Indian in the Cupboard #2)

3.85  ·  Rating details ·  11,641 ratings  ·  266 reviews
It's been over a year since Omri discovered in The Indian in the Cupboard that, with the turn of a key, he could magically bring to life the three-inch-high Indian figure he placed inside his cupboard. Omri and his Indian, Little Bear, create a fantastic world together until one day, Omri realizes the terrible consequences if Little Bear ever got trapped in his "giant" wor ...more
Hardcover, First Edition, 183 pages
Published September 3rd 1986 by Doubleday & Company, Inc. (first published 1985)
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Average rating 3.85  · 
Rating details
 ·  11,641 ratings  ·  266 reviews


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Karina
Jan 31, 2020 rated it liked it
I wanted to like this one more than I did! Dang it, Lynne! The first and fourth were great but this one was so so. It seemed like a sequel just to make a sequel. Little Bear, Bright Stars and Boone come back during an invasion by the Frenchmen in the 19th century. Little Bear is wounded while Bright Stars is obviously carrying a child in the womb.

There were new characters and more Indians. Patrick and Omri even go back in time to help the Iroquois. They decide to give them 20th century weapons!
...more
Melissa
Mar 25, 2010 rated it liked it
Shelves: books-for-boys
I am not sure why Lynne Reid Banks feels the need to ruin these great books with coarse words. The Indian in the Cupboard series are great. Boys and girls both love them. There isn't much that could be more exciting to a child than their toys coming to life. But is it necessary to us a--, and other words similar to this in a child's book? I just finished reading this aloud to my children. They loved it. I edited out the words that weren't necessary as I was going.
Madeline Henricksen
Jun 16, 2012 rated it liked it
"The Return of the Indian", the sequel to "The Indian in the Cupboard", is about a boy named Omri, a boy named Patrick, a miniature Native American brave called Little Bear, and a miniature Native American squaw called Bright Stars. When Omri opens his magic cupboard again (after keeping it closed for a year) he finds that his best friend Little Bear is now an Indian Chief and he has been wounded. Omri and Patrick must help the wounded Little Bear. As Little Bear recovers, he tells them of the F ...more
Jeremy X
Overall, the Return of the Indian was a good book, but not amazing. The Indian in the Cupboard, the first book of the series, was more exciting, yet this was a good enough sequel. It has more problems and drama when Little Bear demands "now-guns," his name for modern guns. However, him and his tribe have no training on how to use them, and trouble occurs... Banks doesn't explain the characters as well as the first book.
Sarah Sammis
Nov 12, 2007 rated it liked it
Shelves: released
The Return of the Indian is the second of the Indian in the Cupboard series. After a year of keeping the cupboard locked, Omri decides to see Little Bear again.

When Omri brings Little Bear back to life he learns first hand the brutality of war. In an effort to help Little Bear win the war, Omri and his friends interfere first by sending weapons back and then by going back themselves.

See, it's not the cupboard that's magic, it's actually the key. But what and who can go back isn't exactly explain
...more
Kim
Jul 02, 2009 rated it really liked it
In my humble little opinion this book is practically equal in its appeal to the first, which can be tricky for a sequel.
The magic is still there and its still a charming story, with the added bonus of extra characters such as Matron and Corporal Fickits.
I love the way the dialogue is written especially that of Little Bull and Boone, and the author has really made it very easy to fully imagine the personality of each little person.
I've read descriptions of the remaining books in this series, and
...more
C-shaw
Jan 11, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Second book in _The Indian in the Cupboard_ series. Delightful children's story which is exciting and mature enough for adults to enjoy as well!
Bernadette
Dec 04, 2018 rated it really liked it
Another book club book success!
Kim Hampton
Dec 31, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read this book as a kid, and it was just as good as an adult!
Edi Maguire
Sep 05, 2019 rated it really liked it
Good book
Mary
Sep 14, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: audiobooks
Charming and whimsical and, yes, completely believable. But I didn’t love that Banks used moving Omri and his family to the “bad part of town” as a plot device.
Dana
Aug 18, 2020 rated it it was amazing
I liked it was a little show and I can't wait to get the next book
Laura
Mar 31, 2020 rated it liked it
Not as good as the original, in my opinion, but my kiddos enjoyed it.
Jennifer
Feb 28, 2020 rated it liked it
Not as good as the first book. It was still good, but the story lacked the nuance and depth of the first. Also, there were a couple times when Omri seemed to act extremely out of character and that bothered me. But still a pretty good sequel.
Mrtracksclass
Apr 01, 2013 rated it liked it
Book Review of Return of the Indian- by Lynne Reid Banks

"Return of the Indian" is the second book of four in the classic series of "The Indian in the Cupboard." The series narrates different tales of a child's toys coming to life, similar to the Disney movie "A Toy Story." Main character Omri in "Return of the Indian" controls the fate of his toys, obliging him to make many adult decisions throughout the novel. It’s not always fun and games for Omri when the toys don't want to get along with e
...more
Ethan
Jul 30, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I like this book a lot because I have a favorite chapter in this book and I will tell you about it. It all started when Omri and Patrick found out how to put themselves in Indian time of Little Bear. They put Omri in the chest and then locked it with the skeleton key and opened the door and Omri was gone. Omri told Patrick to go five minutes, but five minutes passed and Patrick didn't send him back. And Boone the cowboy was sent back in time too. And while he was looking Omri saw a man who had f ...more
Kressel Housman
In some ways, this sequel is even better than the first book. Omri is a year older, so he's dealing with more mature issues, specifically some skinhead bullies in his new neighborhood. Similarly, Patrick, who spends part of the book denying that the events of the first ever happened, also represents this oncoming maturity. The boys are nearing the end of childhood.

The first few chapters are entirely non-magical. Omri has won a writing contest for the story of the Indian. Even though that bit i
...more
Alice
Jun 01, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: read-to-the-kids
I am reading these aloud to my 8 yo daughter. She is really enjoying them & I recommend them. One caution: the second book is less light-hearted than the first. Boo-hoo Boone is still often funny and the idea of tiny beings drinking from toothpaste tops and doing other mini things is still fun, especially I think for kids who play pretend like that with their figures, but Omri, through, his little people, faces death and loss, and the heavy consequences of decisions they make. [SPOILER - - - - - ...more
Dione Basseri
Jul 12, 2015 rated it really liked it
Where the first Indian book was about the magic of childhood and the importance of understanding others, this book takes a bit of a darker turn. Onri brings Little Bear back to tell him a bit of news, only to find that the Iroquois village has been destroyed by the French and his friend nearly killed. Reluctantly, Onri agrees to supply Little Bear with weapons to strike back against the French, but comes to realize that he isn't necessarily supporting the "good" side. Just..._A_ side.

There's a b
...more
Cecelia
Jun 14, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
In the Indian in the Cupboard #1, Omri gets a magic cupboard but nobody knows it's magic until Omri puts a toy Indian inside and he comes to life. Now, in The Return of the Indian, Omri brings back the Indian. His name is Little Bear. When he brings him and his wife back, Omri notices that Little Bear was shot in a war because there is a war going on where Little Bear is coming from. Omri makes a nurse real with the cupboard to fix Little Bear. When Little Bear is all healed he wants to go back ...more
Mary-Jane
May 04, 2014 rated it really liked it
In this sequel to "The Indian in the Cupbard", Omri brings Little Bull back to life after a year in order to share with him that he has won first prize in a writing contest. His entry was based on his adventures with Little Bull. Things become more complicated when Little Bull comes back injured and unresponsive and with two bullets in his back after his village was attacked by the Algonquins. Omri and his friend Patrick help to save Little Bull but then contribute to disastrous consequences whe ...more
Caleb
May 13, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I liked it. They bring back Little Bear and Boone cause Patrick came on a vacation from his new house. They lose the key and Little Bear got really hurt and they couldn't get anybody to help him and they needed to save Little Bear. My favorite part was burglars were coming to their house and he shot the burglars with teeny guns and it was really funny.
Michele
Oct 07, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: books-of-2011
I'm reading this with my fourth grader. We both loved it. Lots of action, adventure and fun. Just ordered the rest of the series.
Great books for elementary age kids.
San
Dec 20, 2018 rated it really liked it
This book did got better and a bit serious.
Omari seem to have grown and understand the consequences of his or anybody's action that will effect the other party and history and the past as we know it.
And ofcourse we have Patrick who still has not grown a brain yet. It's common to have character whose stupidity baffles you.Characters like these were essential part of the book in those time because their absurd action makes the main character to stand out and take better decisions,which turns the m
...more
Lara Vehar
Nov 11, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I rarely enjoy a sequel as much as I enjoy the first book - this one was just as good if not better than the first one.

It's more intense - for one, two characters we've grown to love in the first book die- one being Tommy the WWI doctor and the other being Boone's horse. I do wish that the author dove deeper into Omri dealing with grief though. He is distressed to learn that Tommy died and he is upset that his cat accidentally killed Boone's horse, but then it's just never mentioned again aside
...more
Rebecca Hill
Oh my goodness! I am not sure that I can properly wrap this up quickly! I absolutely LOVED this book! I will be sharing this one with my boys as we move back into our nighttime reading before bed.

Omri has brought his friend Little Bear back in his magic cupboard, and it seems it was just in time! Little Bear was injured in the fighting that was raging in his village. But the adventures are just starting there. As the adventure moves on, the boys attempt to help their friend protect his village.
...more
Jamie
Oct 17, 2018 rated it really liked it
I felt like this was a great sequel. Omri and Patrick have moved away from each other, it's been about a year. Omri has written a story for a fiction contest about his experience with the cupboard, and it won first prize. He decides to put Little Bear back into the cupboard and see how he's doing. He's become a chief, but he is injured.

Omri goes to get Patrick, and they bring a matron to heal him. He is told a story of how the French as well as other tribes are attacking their village. They get
...more
R C
Apr 10, 2020 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This book was left behind in my classroom by a previous teacher. I picked it up with the intent to find out how racist it actually was. I'm that regard, there is more than I'm equipped to unpack, but, in short, there was some unmitigated use of slurs while, on the other hand, the author seems interested in recognizing that "Indians" are not a monolith. Ultimately, I found the read bland and cartoonish -- YA fiction has come so far since the late 20th century. The characters seemed undercooked an ...more
Logan Mclean
May 03, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: trimester-2
The return of the Indian by Lynne Reid Banks. Little bear is hurt in the French and Indian war, and bright stars is mysteriously gaining weight? some new friends are made, and some are lost. one of the books strengths was how easy to read and how short the chapters where. It was quick and snappy. One of the weaknesses was how one thing would take up two chapters, even if it was not important. I liked this book because it would keep me entertained and thrilled. All though I liked the first one mo ...more
Robert
Nov 11, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This is a delightful continuation on the adventures related in Indian in the cupboard. Banks begins to explore more in depth how the cupboard, key, and time travel work. This is kind of where the story breaks down for me. The mechanics of the whole process are poorly explained and don't seem to have a definitive logic. However, it is a kids book. I don't remember this being a problem when I first read it at age 8.
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Lynne Reid Banks is a British author of books for children and adults. She has written forty books, including the best-selling children's novel The Indian in the Cupboard, which has sold over 10 million copies and been made into a film.
Banks was born in London, the only child of James and Muriel Reid Banks. She was evacuated to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada during World War II but returned after
...more

Other books in the series

The Indian in the Cupboard (5 books)
  • The Indian in the Cupboard (The Indian in the Cupboard, #1)
  • The Secret of the Indian (The Indian in the Cupboard, #3)
  • The Mystery of the Cupboard (The Indian in the Cupboard, #4)
  • The Key to the Indian (The Indian in the Cupboard, #5)

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“With hands that shook, Omri probed into the depths of the chest till he found the box-within-a-box-within-a-box.” 1 likes
“cupboard. The strange little key, which had been his great-grandmother’s,” 1 likes
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