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In der Strafkolonie

3.98  ·  Rating details ·  15,046 ratings  ·  796 reviews
Inhaltsverzeichnis:

Franz Kafka: In der Strafkolonie - Erzählansätze für einen anderen Schluss der Erzählung - Briefzeugnisse - Zeittafel - Der Trick mit dem Blick. Die Strafkolonie als Publikationsphantasie - Entstehungs- und Textgeschichte - Zur Aufnahme der Erzählung beim zeitgenössischen Publikum - Annäherungen: Deutungslinien - Anregungen - Aneignungen - Literatur -
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Paperback, 132 pages
Published by Suhrkamp BasisBibliothek (first published October 1919)
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Kwoman " اضاف المترجم مقال نشر لكافكا" ابن اوى و العرب
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Ahmad Sharabiani
In der Strafkolonie = In the Penal Settlement = In the Penal Colony, Franz Kafka
In the Penal Colony is a short story by Franz Kafkaو written in Germanو in October 1914, revised in November 1918, and first published in October 1919. The story is set in an unnamed penal colony. Internal clues and the setting on an island suggest Octave Mirbeau's The Torture Garden as an influence. As in some of Kafka's other writings, the narrator in this story seems detached from, or perhaps numbed by, events
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Cecily
There is often menace and even horror in Kafka's works, but not usually blood and gore, as this has. Nevertheless, in many ways, it is quintessential Kafka, featuring abuse of the law, the mental horror of a helpless and uniformed protagonist, an outsider, a degree of surrealism, and some dry asides.

The Harrowing Harrow

The plot is grim but simple. A traveller to a tropical penal colony is invited to watch their unique method of execution: a complex machine (the Harrow) engraves the words of the
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
In der Strafkolonie = In the Penal Colony = In the Penal Settlement, Franz Kafka
In the Penal Colony is a short story by Franz Kafka written in German in October 1914, revised in November 1918, and first published in October 1919. The story is set in an unnamed penal colony. Internal clues and the setting on an island suggest Octave Mirbeau's The Torture Garden as an influence. As in some of Kafka's other writings, the narrator in this story seems detached from, or perhaps numbed by, events that
...more
Gaurav
Sep 21, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
The injustice of the procedure and inhumanity of the execution were incontestable

The very last words of In the Penal Colony move across my bewildered eyes, sitting in the Kafkaesque corner of my apartment, I feel numb since words refuse to come to my observant mind, the comatose feeling blinds my consciousness which fails to pick up words from cerebral saucepan. The prophetic fable of Kafka is full of Kafkaesque elements which would provide eerie dizzying delight to his fans. Set in a remote
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J.L.   Sutton
Oct 19, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Image result for meme kafka penal colony

"He doesn't know the sentence that has been passed on him?" "No," said the officer again, pausing a moment as if to let the explorer elaborate his question, and then said: "there would be no point in telling him. He'll learn it on his body."

Franz Kafkas In the Penal Colony, recounts the execution of a prisoner by means of an elaborate and strange machine that inscribes the broken law on the condemned mans body. The officer in charge of the execution tells the traveler (who stands in for the
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Duane
I thought I was reading Edgar Allan Poe there for a moment. The torture/execution machine in this short story was worthy of Poe's imagination. What was it's purpose? To torture or to execute? Either one would be most cruel in it's application. But in this case it serves the dual purpose. It also had an Orwellian feel to it. Of course Kafka was sandwiched between these two writers so it's hard to say any influence existed.
Zaphirenia
May 19, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Kafka is hard enough for me when I read him in my native language, let alone in German. And I'm not talking about the difficulties of reading in a foreign language, no. Although my German is definitely to be improved, this was not the problem. But I think that when you read him in the original the feelings created, that powerful sense of anguish and suffocation is magnified. The rhythm is steadier and the Kafkaesque absurdity more intense, I think.

Anyway, linguistic observations aside, the
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Czarny Pies
Sep 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone who is not already familiar with Kafka if such there be.
Shelves: german-lit, czech-lit
The Penal Colony is a very powerful fable about a machine that is used on in a Penal Colony located on a pacific island to execute prisoners over a period of 12 hours. It is thus by any standards an extremely loathsome device and a very evil misapplication of human technology. However, the machine's inventor is so convinced of the machine's fundamental rightness that he casually places himself in it in order to be executed. The point seems to be that man has an extraordinary ability to ignore ...more
Katherine Elizabeth
I had no idea what this was about going into it. I found this short-story for free online and thought "why not?" But goodness. It's about torture, and I was not ready to read about something like that, right now. Plus, the writing is okay. But the story itself is nothing special and I probably wouldn't have read it if it wasn't free.
Bruce
Jan 22, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This grim and horrifying short story is, among other things (for example, the nature of justice, the differences between cultures and cultural assumptions and practices, etc), a reflection on the nature of language and verbal communication. We commonly think of language as a mediator, an abstract descriptor of reality that never is quite able to be as accurate, as precise as the intended meaning, that never is able to be what we so desperately try to describe and share with each other. And we ...more
Ram Alsrougi
It looks like a small and charming book, but it leaves you uneasy with its terrifying atmosphere and mysterious characters.
Jim
Dec 11, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Franz Kafka, you eihter going to hate him or love him and in this case... you going to love him. Even if you are one of those who hears the name Kafka and thinks "oh i hate that guy" ( im not, i like him ) i think that you going to like this book.

A few kilometers away from a colony, in the middle of a desert, stands a killing machine. Near it there is a military officer, a soldier, a prisoner that is going to be executed soon ( for something he may have done ) and..... you. Well in the book says
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Rozzer
Jul 24, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: germany, reviewed, fiction
I first read this story (actually at least thrice, readings two and three immediately succeeding in turn after the first) when I was nine, in fourth grade (Mrs. Plotkin's class) in 1954. I was mad for short stories at the time and had bought a twenty-five cent small paperback anthology (even smaller than a Penguin, a size "They" haven't made for forty or fifty years) of which In the Penal Colony was the final story in the back of the book.

I read it, and couldn't understand a thing. I could
...more
Brian
Apr 03, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
Re-read Update, 2.6.18

I will have to think about this for some time, to understand the subtle depths of Kafkas message. Im sure someone has written about it, and I can cheat and read someone elses study. This was deep, intrusive, gory, shocking. Kafka goes into bloody detail about a torture chamber; he has a message for those who carry justice and abuse the power.

A foreign traveler visits an officer in charge of a torture device and witnesses an execution. They strap a man down and it rolls him
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Jon Nakapalau
Aug 19, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics
One of my favorite Kafka stories. The nature of punishment and who punishes the punishers is a relevant issue today...one could argue that the relevancy of this issue has only grown as every country tries to deal with issues of terrorism and revolutionary movements.
Moha Dem
It didn't really impress me ... Is it because it's a short story or Kafka wasn't as good as known to be or am just wrong lol
Chris_P
In the Penal Colony is a short story by Kafka a little different than the others, yet not. There are four characters in the story, each symbolizing his own bit. The Traveler goes to an island to inspect a method of execution carried out by The Officer with the use of a strange, yet elaborate machine. There is also The Condemned Man and The Soldier present. Soon enough the reader realizes that the machine isn't just a means of execution but rather an inhumane instrument of torture.

I don't want to
...more
David Sarkies
Jul 25, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who love Kafka
Recommended to David by: One of my book clubs
Shelves: modernist
A horrific form of industrialised punishment
28 July 2014

I found this to be a little different to some of the other works of Kafka that I had read because there was actually some dialogue between the characters, despite the characters simply being described as 'The Explorer', 'The Soldier' and 'The Condemned Man'. As such, while the characters had a voice, they did not necessarily have a name, which in one sense deprives them of an identity as such, but also gives them a somewhat generalistic
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Abd El-Rahman El-Naggar
I can't believe I actually respected the Officer by the end of the story. While his beliefs are purely evil, if you can ever call anything purely evil, he stayed committed to them to the very end. He even died to prove his point. I loved that. The Condemned, on whose side we were in the beginning of the story, turned out to be.. umm.. a bastard. The Officer did forgive him, but when places changed, the Condemned failed to give forgiveness back to the Officer. Maybe he wasn't aware that he was ...more
Fergus
Oct 03, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I wanted to reread this horrific parable by Kafka one more time- its been more than 50 years... So I bought & tried to read this affordable Kindle version.

The original story is monumentally sardonic, a lugubriously dark tale about bad men of the twisted bent of an Ultimate Evil, which in the terror it evokes is Beyond Words.

I was stupid, and I tried to read this.

Horrors. This book was a lame and typo-ridden literal translation of the original version.

To put Philip Glass name to it is
...more
Lorenzo Berardi
Eighty eight years before standing on a beach staring at the sea with Haruki Murakami, Franz Kafka went to the tropics.

Being such a hermit crab, he stayed out of the tourist routes, taking a boat for docking in a muggy island and visiting a charming Penal Colony. Does it sound too heavy? Well, in case you didn't noticed, not everybody likes spending holidays drinking cold beer while swinging on a hammock giving a look to suntanned beauties all day long.
Do you really think that a pale and
...more
W.H. Johnson
Jun 06, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Im puzzled. As its expected I should be. Ive been at the Kafka again. I have a dab at him once or twice every ten years and always come away bemused. Whats the point of it? Whats he getting at? Truth is that Ive never had the determination to stick with him. But then this week I tried In the penal colony. Mind you, Im still a touch uncertain where hes coming from or going to but this time I didnt retire before the bell. Not that that implies that Im any wiser about Kafkas intentions in this ...more
David
Aug 13, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-fiction
It's tough to know what we're supposed to think after reading this bewildering story. I first thought that this story was a commentary on rise of the Tea Party mentality, but considering the time and place of composition, it seems unlikely that this was the author's intent.

My long-suffering wife (LSW) has explained repeatedly that actually caring what the author's intent was in writing X or Y is considered a sign of hopelessly out-of-fashion literary sensibility. Yet I cannot rid myself of this
...more
Numidica
May 30, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A short book (really a short story) by Kafka which is an allegory of Europe moving from rigid, often unjust, punishment for minor offenses toward the more liberal society of the "present". Since it was written in 1914, Kafka had no way of knowing how vigorously the old draconian system would revive, if only for twelve years, in the form of national socialism under Hitler. But ultimately his allegory proved mostly correct.
SheAintGotNoShoes
Jan 25, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
My worst nightmare come true. Of all the horrible things that are present in the world ( poverty, war, rape, murder, animal abuse, lack of human rights, illness, homelessness.....), nothing frightens me more than torture and the description of what this machine does and how long it takes the victim to die filled me with incredible fear and horror.

As a horror story it was brilliant, as something that could be used - stuff of real nightmares
Laura
Another masterpiece by this genius of the literature.
Το Άθχημο Γατί Καρολίνα
Kafka planned to publish in 1915 a collection containing "The Judgment", "Metamorphosis" and " In the Penal Colony " under the general title "Strafen" (Punishments), which eventually did not occur.

The machine described in the short story may be inspired by Herman Hollerith's machine based on punched cards (see Stanley Corngold and Benno Wagner: Franz Kafka: The Ghosts in the Machine) but could also have been influenced by the profession of his fiancee, Felice Bauer, who worked as a stenographer
...more
Lovesfrost
Jan 13, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book was really insane -like really -crazy -insane... The apparatus that's talked about here reminds me of a TV show "Machines of malice" . Now about this very complicated apparatus -it does not kill you right away but slowly- very slowly- over a period of'12' hours!!-probably in the most most cruelest way by engraving deeper and deeper in your body.
This is Kafka's world so,you've got a prisoner who does not know why and how he shall be punished (The Trial flashbacks)!
The most
...more
John
Feb 28, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The Penal Colony ('In der Strafkolonie') is a very well-known, popular short story from Kafka. Although perhaps a bit more over-the-top than his other stories, The Penal Colony has all the Kafkaesque element one would expect: a detached narrator, omnipotent horror, deathly irony, et cetera.

The story tells of a colony for the Condemned and their torture and eventual execution by a device which carves their sentence on their skin. Our narrator is an ambivalent Explorer who is given a comprehensive
...more
Jayanth
Jan 14, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
CRAZY doesn't begin to explain this story. What the hell, it was so dark but awesome too. This my second Franz Kafka book in 2 days, the first being The Metamorphosis. I liked both the stories very much, the dark themes and the narration.

Torture devices have always been used in the judiciary systems all over the world until very recently. These belong in the list of abominations created by humans and should be represented in our history, without shame, to show the savagery of men and their
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Goodreads Librari...: Original publication Date 3 7 May 24, 2019 03:27AM  
In the penal colony novella 1 7 Aug 28, 2017 07:25AM  
What themes are you picking out of this story? 1 10 Jan 31, 2017 10:52AM  
كيف تتلذذ بالموت 2 25 Jun 05, 2014 07:35AM  
Franz Kafka: The Penal Colony 11 49 Dec 06, 2012 06:41AM  

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Franz Kafka was one of the major fiction writers of the 20th century. He was born to a middle-class German-speaking Jewish family in Prague, Bohemia (presently the Czech Republic), AustriaHungary. His unique body of writingmuch of which is incomplete and which was mainly published posthumouslyis considered to be among the most influential in Western literature.

His stories include "The
...more

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“Many questions were troubling the explorer, but at the sight of the prisoner he asked only: "Does he know his sentence?" "No," said the officer, eager to go on with his exposition, but the explorer interrupted him: "He doesn't know the sentence that has been passed on him?" "No," said the officer again, pausing a moment as if to let the explorer elaborate his question, and then said: "There would be no point in telling him. He'll learn it on his body.” 12 likes
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