Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity” as Want to Read:
Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity

by
4.27  ·  Rating details ·  26 ratings  ·  10 reviews
In " Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity, "Janine Barchas " "makes the bold assertion that Jane Austen's novels allude to actual high-profile politicians and contemporary celebrities as well as to famous historical figures and landed estates. Barchas is the first scholar to conduct extensive research into the names and locations in Austen's fic ...more
Hardcover, 336 pages
Published August 20th 2012 by Johns Hopkins University Press
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Matters of Fact in Jane Austen, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Matters of Fact in Jane Austen

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-56
Average rating 4.27  · 
Rating details
 ·  26 ratings  ·  10 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity
Rikke
May 02, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recently I realised how much I miss reading academic texts. I miss being challenged on my interpretations and readings from well-researched academics and diving further between the lines of my favourite novels.

And so, I remembered this book that has been collecting dust on my shelf since I wrote my dissertation on Jane Austen. In many ways, my dissertation scared me off Austen-scholars, not because I didn't like what they had to say, but because I associated them with that half year of isolated
...more
Maria
Jan 14, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This was a fascinating and readable thesis. In all my years of Jane Austen studies, reading literary criticism and analyses, and biographies, I had wondered, like many people, did Jane Austen use real people and incidents for her wonderful stories? The generally accepted theory has been no, and family accounts seemed to reinforce this, however, all authors have ideas and they get those ideas from real life. Why not Jane Austen?

In Debrett’s The Peerage as well as The Navy List, Barchas discovers
...more
Margaret Sankey
Feb 04, 2016 rated it really liked it
This books upends my usual annoyance with a lot of Austen scholarship, the theme that Austen was a shy homebody whose books are timeless because they are in a sealed bubble of the Real Housewives of Rural Vicarages. Instead, this was someone who was not only plugged into world affairs (brothers in the upper ranks of the active navy, connections to the French Revolution, extremely well read in English history, consumer of celebrity news), but perfectly willing and able to tap references to enhanc ...more
Catie
Mar 03, 2018 marked it as to-read
Recommendation from IG (@teawithdarcy) - 2/20/2018
Andrea Hickman Walker
This was amazing. If you enjoy Jane Austen, you should read this -- it makes such a difference to the reading of the novels, if you can understand all these little details in the background.
Ashlea (plotdriven.com)
Aug 19, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Modern readers also tend to think of Jane as writing her books in a bit of a social vacuum – her writing advice of “3 or 4 Families in a Country Village is the very thing to work on” is often quoted. The author of Matters of Fact in Jane Austen thinks we’ve been looking at this all the wrong way. While Jane’s books sold well enough in her lifetime, they fell out of print and her reputation was not established until they were reprinted in the 1830s. Even in that short period of time, the signific ...more
Emily
One of the more (intellectually) exciting Austen books I've read in a while. It's the rare academic book where I start reading passages to whomever is nearby, regardless of their background or interest in the subject.

Devoney Looser has an excellent review of it and Claudia Johnson's Austen book (also published by Chicago). I'm currently reading the Johnson, which so far is also fabulous.

Here's Looser's LARB piece:

http://lareviewofbooks.org/article.ph...
...more
University of Chicago Magazine
Janine Barchas, AM'90, PhD'95
Author

From the author: "This book makes the bold assertion that Jane Austen’s novels allude to actual high-profile politicians and contemporary celebrities as well as to famous historical figures and landed estates. Barchas is the first scholar to conduct extensive research into the names and locations in Austen’s fiction by taking full advantage of the explosion of archival materials now available online. According to Barchas, Austen plays confidently with the tensi
...more
Devoney Looser
I've had the pleasure of reviewing this book: Looser, Devoney. “The State of the Union of Jane Austen, Fact and Fiction” (Review essay). Los Angeles Review of Books (27 Jan 2013): n. pag. Web. http://lareviewofbooks.org/article.ph....
...more
Beth
rated it liked it
Dec 05, 2016
Ting
rated it it was ok
Dec 14, 2013
Erika
rated it really liked it
Jun 06, 2015
Andrea
rated it really liked it
Feb 10, 2018
George
rated it it was amazing
Mar 03, 2016
Grace Reuter
rated it really liked it
Sep 23, 2014
Jessica
rated it liked it
Dec 08, 2020
Lori
rated it it was amazing
Sep 29, 2016
Nina
rated it it was amazing
May 30, 2016
vard
rated it it was amazing
Aug 24, 2014
Jennifer
rated it it was amazing
Jul 28, 2018
Alison
rated it it was amazing
Jun 18, 2014
Amy
rated it liked it
Aug 01, 2014
Luciana Darce
rated it really liked it
Feb 16, 2019
James Bojaciuk
rated it it was amazing
Feb 07, 2016
Kellie Ann
rated it liked it
Jan 12, 2015
Stacey
rated it it was amazing
Feb 13, 2015
Gillian
rated it liked it
Apr 08, 2015
Lady
rated it it was amazing
Feb 22, 2014
Sharon
marked it as to-read
Sep 04, 2012
Katherine M
marked it as to-read
Sep 05, 2012
Jasmine
marked it as to-read
Sep 05, 2012
Mary
marked it as to-read
Sep 10, 2012
Rebecca Huston
marked it as to-read
Sep 15, 2012
Kerry
marked it as to-read
Sep 16, 2012
Kim
marked it as to-read
Oct 11, 2012
Sarah
marked it as to-read
Oct 24, 2012
Hannah
marked it as to-read
Jan 16, 2013
Annalynn
marked it as to-read
Feb 07, 2013
Felicia (felso)
marked it as to-read
Feb 18, 2013
Karen
marked it as to-read
Mar 04, 2013
Debye
marked it as to-read
Mar 05, 2013
Colette
marked it as to-read
Mar 14, 2013
Hope
marked it as to-read
Mar 27, 2013
Andrea
marked it as to-read
May 23, 2013
Laura
marked it as to-read
May 25, 2013
Tanya
marked it as to-read
May 26, 2013
Hilary
marked it as to-read
May 30, 2013
Laurie
added it
Jul 13, 2013
Julie
marked it as to-read
Jul 28, 2013
Megan
marked it as to-read
Aug 17, 2013
Sarah
marked it as to-read
Sep 10, 2013
Georgina
marked it as to-read
Oct 19, 2013
Rebecca
marked it as to-read
Oct 24, 2013
Rebecca
marked it as to-read
Oct 30, 2013
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Sibling Love and Incest in Jane Austen's Fiction
  • Kathy Griffin's Celebrity Run-Ins: My A-Z Index
  • Jane Austen, Feminism and Fiction: Second Edition
  • The Power of Self-Compassion
  • The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks
  • Hiroshima
  • Survivor In Death (In Death, #20)
  • Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics
  • The Indignities of Being a Woman
  • To the Island of Tides: A Journey to Lindisfarne
  • The Invention of Childhood
  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII
  • The Fourth Industrial Revolution
  • Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England
  • The Lost Girls: The True Story of the Cleveland Abductions and the Incredible Rescue of Michelle Knight, Amanda Berry, and Gina DeJesus
  • Bring Up the Bodies
  • Elizabeth's London: Everyday Life in Elizabethan London
See similar books…

Related Articles

Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “We are not makers of history. We are made by history.” So, this January, as we celebrate Martin Luther King...
61 likes · 17 comments