Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages” as Want to Read:
Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages

by
4.18  ·  Rating details ·  28 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
One of the major figures of twentieth-century Catholic theology, Henri Cardinal de Lubac was known for his attention to the doctrine of the church and its life within the contemporary world. In Corpus Mysticum de Lubac investigates a particular understanding of the relation of the church to the eucharist. He sets out the nature of the church as communion, a doctrine that i ...more
Paperback, 360 pages
Published September 1st 2007 by University of Notre Dame Press (first published 1944)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Jacob Aitken

De Lubac outlines the origins and evolution of the “three-fold Body of Christ,” particularly as its known by the term “corpus mysticum,” the mystical body. It is tempting to read earlier phrases for the church—such as “the body of Christ”—back into the phrase “mystical body,” and define it that way. De Lubac warns against that move, since either the phrase “mystical body” (hereafter MB) is either rare in the Fathers or is not used in the later medieval sense. The threefold body is the Eucharist
...more
Steve
Oct 19, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A rich and complicated account of the development of the "threefold body of Christ" in the medieval period.
Earl
Jan 14, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology
What is worth keeping in de Lubac's historical accounts of the development of theology (my favorite aspect of doing theology, so to speak) is that in the process of developing doctrines or formulations of truth, there is always something lost. Therefore, we need to pay attention to what fades or else we miss the important things that are part of it.

Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages shows how de Lubac turned to the theology of the Eucharist, and points out that in
...more
Brett Salkeld
The book is long and deals with arcane subject matter in excruciating detail. I loved it. This book is not exactly accesible, but it is difficult to overstate its importance for the subject at hand. 20th Century Christian ecclesiology has been revolutionized by de Lubac's careful analysis of the development of the relationship between the Church and the Eucharist through the Middle Ages. It seems to me that the next question is, "If ecclesiology had to be re-imagined because of its intrinsic rel ...more
Nic Don
May 17, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: for-school
For what it is, a study into the specifics of the transference of the phrase "mystical body" from the eucharist to the church in medieval Catholicism, this book is unrivaled. That is, of course, a very narrow subsection of interests, and most theologians would do well to consult a summary of the content of this book. What everyone, especially Protestant readers, needs to engage with directly is de Lubac's conclusion and the following material, effectively an essay for which the historical survey ...more
Ryan
Feb 09, 2016 rated it really liked it
The plethora of quotes by Patristic, Middle age, and medieval theologians that I've not found in many other places may be worth the price of the book. I felt like the points could have been made in about 150 pages shorter, but it was certainly worth the read in just exposing the reader to new theologians throughout the ages of the church.
David
May 12, 2016 rated it liked it
A challenging read with lots of historical characters and theological quotes. De Lubac gives us a ton of early medieval quotes that sound very Protestant (Calvin) but then is very dismissive of a rather straightforward reading of their "spiritual" teaching on the Eucharist.
Tora
Nov 22, 2007 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: theoloy nerds
Reading the book for an analytical essay. All about the phrase "mystical body" and how it's been used in the Church... am I nerd if I really and truly enjoy this stuff?
Lyndon
rated it really liked it
May 22, 2011
Howard
rated it really liked it
Apr 17, 2012
Matt Hale
rated it liked it
Feb 06, 2018
Joel Burdine
rated it it was amazing
Sep 11, 2018
Nic Hutchinson
rated it really liked it
Sep 08, 2007
Doug
rated it it was amazing
Oct 25, 2007
Elizabeth
rated it it was amazing
Jul 15, 2018
Bryan
rated it it was amazing
May 04, 2012
Melissa Smeltzer
rated it it was amazing
Apr 10, 2013
Matt
rated it liked it
Sep 27, 2010
Andrew
rated it really liked it
Sep 27, 2017
Jonathan Navas
rated it really liked it
Jun 29, 2013
David Mosley
rated it really liked it
Apr 15, 2014
Luke
rated it really liked it
Aug 13, 2018
Lloyd Duhon
rated it liked it
Aug 16, 2014
Seth
rated it really liked it
Sep 20, 2011
Greg
rated it really liked it
May 10, 2013
Nic Hutchinson
rated it really liked it
Sep 08, 2007
Nic Don
rated it it was amazing
Jan 01, 2017
Mpole Masemola
rated it it was amazing
Jan 14, 2015
Russell
rated it it was amazing
Aug 05, 2010
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
44 followers
Henri-Marie de Lubac, SJ (1896-1991) was a French Jesuit priest who became a Cardinal of the Catholic Church, and is considered to be one of the most influential theologians of the 20th century. His writings and doctrinal research played a key role in the shaping of the Second Vatican Council.

De Lubac became a faculty member at Catholic Faculties of Theology of Lyons, where he taught history of re
...more