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Consulting the Faithful: What Christian Intellectuals Can Learn from Popular Religion

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  10 ratings  ·  2 reviews
The president of Pasadena's Fuller Theological Seminary carefully assesses the relationship--or lack thereof--between "popular" religion and intellectual orthodoxy. Mouw argues that therapeutic and managerial "revolutions" can bring beneficial new sensitivities to Christian thought and practice.
Paperback, 84 pages
Published October 1st 1994 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
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Tim Hoiland
Oct 02, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: faith
I appreciated Mouw’s call here for a “hermeneutic of charity,” which means developing the discipline of trying to find the good in something that “we might otherwise reject without carefully considering their merit.” There will be time for critique; our first instinct should be charitable.
Alex Stroshine
Sep 24, 2014 rated it really liked it
Richard Mouw provides a conciliatory little book that addresses how theologians can learn from laity and their proclivity to practice "folk religion." Many evangelicals have embraced therapeutic insights and Christians such as John Maxwell have been champions of leadership and management methods. Mouw suggests theologians and pastors need to be attentive to why the laity is drawn to folk religion, therapeutic culture and management styles; they are turning to these things because the Church is n ...more
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Richard John Mouw is a theologian and philosopher. He held the position of President at Fuller Theological Seminary for 20 years (1993-2013), and continues to hold the post of Professor of Faith and Public Life.

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