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Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Scotney Castle
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Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Scotney Castle

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3.63  ·  Rating details ·  27 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Second Edition published August 2015

In Sherlock Holmes and The Dead Boer at Scotney Castle the great consulting detective comes up against the rich and powerful Kipling League. Dr Watson recounts the extraordinary events which took place on a spacious early summer day in the Sussex and Kent countryside in 1904.
Paperback, 296 pages
Published March 19th 2012 by MX Publishing (first published March 1st 2012)
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3.63  · 
Rating details
 ·  27 ratings  ·  10 reviews


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Philip Jones
Nov 18, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This is a first novel by an author new to Sherlockian fiction. The presentation of Holmes and Watson is a bit different than is common in such works, but it does seem more sensible than others, both in the Canon and in the many pastiches available. Holmes and Watson disagree and argue and look at the world quite differently than as we are accustomed to view them. On the other hand, the world inhabited by this Holmes and Watson is quite different from that of the Canon and most pastiches. It is a ...more
Elizabeth Varadan
Nov 06, 2015 rated it really liked it
Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Scotney Castle, is full of surprises, even for the great detective himself.

The adventure begins in early summer of 1904. The President of the Kipling League, David Siviter, sends Sherlock Holmes a telegram, inviting him to Crick’s End in Sussex that afternoon to give a talk to the League as an expert on “the criminal mind.” The League includes Siviter (poet and children’s writer), Alfred Weit, Sir Julius Wernher, and Viscount Van Beers, all rich and powerful
...more
Dale
Sherlock Holmes and the Dead Boer at Scotney Castle by Tim Symonds

Scotney Castle is an English country house with formal gardens south-east of Lamberhurst in the valley of the River Bewl in Kent, England. The Castle has a rich history and today belongs to the National Trust.

It is May of 1904. Holmes is invited to Bateman’s, once the home of Rudyard Kipling and present location of the prestigious Kipling League. Holmes has been asked to speak about his methods of observation and deduction. Watson
...more
Jeremy Reppy
Sep 13, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: first-reads
Holmes is Bested

**SPOILERS**

I would definitely recommend this book.

Mr. Symonds has written another wonderful Holmes and Watson story. It was particularly interesting because it is a story where the criminals actually best Holmes at his own game. By the time he figures out what the Kipling League has done and how they did it, the Kipling League, using Holmes words and methods against him, has managed to cover up their crime so that Holmes cannot possibly prove that murder was performed at the han
...more
CassandraG
Sherlock Holmes and Dead Boer
Review copy provided via Reading Alley in exchange for an honest review.

If you’re a Sherlock Holmes fan and you’ve never come across this book or this author, you’ll be pleasantly surprised that you’ll really come to like it a lot. It’s no Arthur Conan Doyle, but it’s really very good and could be a worthy successor to the Holmes franchise. You like everybody and the mystery that’s developed and the friction between two unexpected friends. And the writing was really
...more
Trish
Jun 06, 2016 rated it liked it
I liked it mainly because I live near the sites of the novel. It's a bit of harmless amusement, but it doesn't have ACD's style as a pastiche really should. JHW as narrator has his inimitable (or nearly) voice; it's possible to develop Holmes further with another narrator (3rd person as with Robert Ryan's WWI Watson novels, or Mary Watson with Jean Dutourd) but the literary equivalent of a "tribute band" needs to stick closer to the original sound.
Harry Cunningham
Jan 18, 2015 rated it really liked it
I have never read any Conan Doyle so can not give a comparison to the Sherlock Holmes series but as a novel I enjoyed it, set in Weald of Kent / Sussex it is a great mystery and enjoyable read. Being set in my home area always helps bring a book to life!
Calvin Daniels
Tedious off the start the story falls into place nicely, but still just too slow to rate higher.

Not as good at the first Holmes book by this author (Bulgarian Codex), but solid enough to seek out more of his stories.
Les Wilson
Sep 09, 2014 rated it it was ok
As a book fair, but as a Sherlock Holmes pastiche awful. It has no Sherlockian feel to it whatever.
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Phi Beta Kappa Authors
Tim Symonds
ΦBK, UCLA, 1964
Author

From the publisher: In Sherlock Holmes and The Dead Boer at Scotney Castle the great consulting detective comes up against the rich and powerful Kipling League. Dr Watson recounts the extraordinary events which took place on a spacious early summer day in the Sussex and Kent countryside in 1904. None of the earlier stories chronicling the adventures of Sherlock Holmes compares to the strange circumstances which determined Watson to take up his pen to relate this
...more
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Tim Symonds was born in London, England, and grew up in Somerset, Dorset and the Channel Island of Guernsey, off the coast of Normandy. After spending his late teens farming in the Kenya Highlands and driving bulldozers along the Zambezi River, he moved to California and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with an honours degree in Politics. He is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and the ...more