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Frederick Douglass on Slavery and the Civil War: Selections from His Writings
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Frederick Douglass on Slavery and the Civil War: Selections from His Writings

4.50  ·  Rating details ·  30 ratings  ·  3 reviews
A former slave, self-taught writer, editor, and public servant, Frederick Douglass was also among the foremost leaders of the abolitionist movement. Recognized as one of the first great African-American speakers in the United States, Douglass was an advisor to President Lincoln during the Civil War and fought for the adoption of constitutional amendments that guaranteed vo ...more
Paperback, 80 pages
Published November 12th 2003 by Dover Publications
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4.50  · 
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 ·  30 ratings  ·  3 reviews


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Mike
Jan 02, 2009 rated it it was amazing
The man possessed a great talent in the use of words. His speech on reform, see below, resonates today.

Frederick Douglass

No Progress Without Struggle!

Let me give you a word of the philosophy of reforms. The whole history of the progress of human liberty shows that all concessions, yet made to her august claims, have been born of earnest struggle. The conflict has been exciting, agitating, all-absorbing, and for the time being putting all other tumults to silence. It must do this or it does not
...more
Julie Unruh
Mar 18, 2013 rated it it was amazing
From being born a slave and escaping to freedom and having to hide for years, but yet be one of President Lincoln's closes friends, he talks very well, very intelligent, for teaching himself to read and write. He did say some good things in there, but if you like history and Fredrick Douglas, then yeah you would enjoy this book, other then that no.
Jrs
Apr 11, 2012 rated it it was ok
Though the introduction served as a nice refresher, the selections serve as teasers and fail to convey the true context of Douglass' speeches and correspondence.
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Frederick Douglass (née Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey) was born a slave in the state of Maryland in 1818. After his escape from slavery, Douglass became a renowned abolitionist, editor and feminist. Having escaped from slavery at age 20, he took the name Frederick Douglass for himself and became an advocate of abolition. Douglass traveled widely, and often perilously, to lecture against sla ...more