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Selected Stories

4.29  ·  Rating details ·  5,707 Ratings  ·  304 Reviews
Spanning almost thirty years and settings that range from big cities to small towns and farmsteads of rural Canada, this magnificent collection brings together twenty-eight stories by a writer of unparalleled wit, generosity, and emotional power. In her Selected Stories, Alice Munro makes lives that seem small unfold until they are revealed to be as spacious as prairies an ...more
Paperback, 688 pages
Published November 11th 1997 by Vintage (first published January 14th 1985)
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s.p
Sep 24, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The complexity of things - the things within things - just seems to be endless. I mean nothing is easy, nothing is simple.

From short accounts of singular events to the sprawling history of a life or love affair, Alice Munro shows it is the little things that matter most. These ‘things within things’ - the greater truth in the smallest of details, are the hearts and souls of her fiction. Selected Stories is an excellent best-of introduction to the author as it collects 28 stories from three dec
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Dolors
Oct 31, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: read-in-2017
The randomness of life, the fine line that separates tragedy from the quotidian, and the silent cracks that grow till they can't be mended after years of repressed grudges.
The desperation of a woman who knows her marriage is going to end and her prayers so that the story doesn't repeat with her two daughters.
As it is usual with Munro, there is no neat closure, just a fragmented glimpse into a life and a stolen glance into what might have been, out of sheer serendipity. Merciless tragedy or sim
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Dia
Mar 07, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Before reading this collection, I'd read one or two of Munro's stories in the New Yorker -- "Deep-Holes" was good enough to tear out & keep -- but I really didn't know what she was up to in general. This collection of short stories will let the reader feel thoroughly familiar with, though never bored by, Munro's style. There are certain things she almost always does (once past her earliest works): begin with a story that isn't the real story and doesn't even really illuminate the real story ...more
Shawn
Sep 23, 2008 rated it it was amazing
She's just a genius. This book came out a decade ago, and doesn't have some of her more recent stuff -- like the wonderful Runaway -- but it's just amazing story after amazing story. The stories have some of the surfaces of quieter, plainer fiction about rural, domestic life, but they're packed with insight and dramatic moment, and Munro is more experimental than she's given credit for -- her leaps in time are jarring and amazing. Especially in the stories that are connected by character and pla ...more
Dave Comerford
Mar 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing
I bet Alice Munro is responsible for a lot of really bad writing. These stories involve ordinary people living in unremarkable towns and cities (Toronto; small prairie towns) doing pretty humdrum things - many of these stories recount visits to old friends or family. The language is so natural and the scenes so well drawn that the text requires no effort to read. It is tempting to believe then that they took no effort or particular talent, or even much a subject matter, to write.

What I am left
...more
Kaisa
Aug 03, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone
Alice Munro writes entirely in the medium of short stories. While I don't mind the trend of ever elongating fiction in modern literature, this collection of Munro's selected shorts is nothing short of a thrill of economy.

Munro's stories are brief, but the impressions her characters and the events to which they are sewed leave with the reader are long lasting. In White Dump, Munro gives us two characters, one a mother, the other her daughter, who move forward and back towards an event that does
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Helen (Helena/Nell)
Jul 29, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Alice Munro is one of the best contemporary short story writers. I know this because everybody says so. Some of them say she is the best.

I love short stories but although I have read Munro before, I have never quite clicked with any of hers. And I love that ‘click’ that comes with the short story, that feeling as you get to the end that you intend to go right back to the beginning again, and that this will be a great pleasure, and that you will do it again and again and again.

I’ve been reading t
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Kristen
Jun 30, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: book-club
This was our latest book club pick, and it was selected because many in the literary community think that Alice Munro should win the Pulitzer Prize; it’s reputed that the only reason she hasn’t is that no author who exclusively writes short stories has ever won (oh, literary politics).

Munro’s writing style is clean, even sparse at times, but she has an ability to pack a mean emotional punch. I’ve heard it said that her stories illuminate the extraordinary in the ordinary lives of people, and it
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the gift
i have read everything published by this author, so impressed she has won deserved Nobel. rather than go through each book i decide to just note those i really like in this selection, then maybe the collections since. you cannot go wrong with any selection. you also will never feel like you have wasted reading time, as she is always concise, always readable, always resonant...

theory on reading alice munro: if each collection has thirteen stories, three or four will be good, six or seven very goo
...more
Jenni
Apr 08, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: shortstories
This is totally random, but when we were in Victoria, BC, I walked into this giant, wonderful bookstore called Munro's Books. I bought a few things there, and the cashier gave me some free store bookmarks. Well, I pulled one out the other day to stick in this book, and then read in the author bio that Alice Munro is in fact the owner of Munro's Books! Go figure.

The stories I have read so far are WONDERFUL. Thanks for the rec, Paula!
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  • Stories in an Almost Classical Mode
  • The Collected Stories
  • The Collected Stories
  • The Stories (So Far)
  • The Collected Stories of Katherine Mansfield
  • Escapes
  • The Wonders Of The Invisible World
  • Believers: A novella and stories
  • Goodbye, Columbus and Five Short Stories / Letting Go
  • I Sailed with Magellan: Stories
  • The Collected Stories
  • Selected Stories
  • The Early Stories
  • Doting
  • Searches and Seizures
  • Paris Stories
  • Selected Poems
  • Collected Stories and Later Writings
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Alice Ann Munro, née Laidlaw, is a Canadian short-story writer who is widely considered one of the world's premier fiction writers. Munro is a three-time winner of Canada's Governor General's Award for fiction. Her stories focus on human relationships looked at through the lens of daily life. She has thus been referred to as "the Canadian Chekhov."

She is the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Liter
...more
More about Alice Munro...
“A story is not like a road to follow … it's more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.” 216 likes
“I loved taking off. In my own house, I seemed to be often looking for a place to hide - sometimes from the children but more often from the jobs to be done and the phone ringing and the sociability of the neighborhood. I wanted to hide so that I could get busy at my real work, which was a sort of wooing of distant parts of myself.” 25 likes
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