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The End of Order

3.7  ·  Rating details ·  23 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
The first world was and the Versailles Treaty that followed produced the most serious upheaval in the long and stormy course of modern history. Four great empires - Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, and Russia - were part of the war's rubble. Far from restoring the world to order, the diplomats who met in 1919 at Paris and at Versailles plunged the world again, this time i ...more
Hardcover, 301 pages
Published November 12th 1980 by Dutton Books
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Morris
Feb 14, 2010 rated it really liked it
The format of the book is a series of short (1 to 2 page) vignettes from the Paris peace conference. Many are quite funny - or would be, if the consequences for the following years were not so grave. Don't miss Keynes parody of minutes from a meeting of the Big 3.
Kevin
Aug 14, 2017 rated it it was amazing
The Catch-22 of Versailles. Everyone knew that the treaty was bad yet they signed it anyways. They felt that politics required them to. It makes absolutely no sense yet when you look back at it that's exactly what appears to have happened. If others had been the negotiators of the treaty everything might have turned out very differently, then again, it might have turned out exactly the same. One thing we can be sure of is that with Wilson, Clemenceau and George as the primary negotiators, things ...more
René
Aug 03, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: histoire
Not really a book about the diplomatic, political and social challenges of the end of WWI, but a book trying to go through the motions of the times (including some useless paragraphs on dadaism) and the battles between the 3 main leaders (Clémenceau, Lloyd George and Wilson), who chose to write most of the treaty by themselves, without consulting anyone or pondering about what it may all lead to. One cannot help but think that most French leaders should also have been tried at Nuremberg for bein ...more
Jeffrey Manners
Dec 28, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: overijse-library
This book is not as ambitious as Margaret Macmillan's "Peacemakers" as its focus is primarily on the the treaty with Germany with some discussion of the issues concerning Austria, Hungary and Italy. To his credit the author does give us considerably more insight than Margaret Macmillan's book as to what was happening in Germany during the six months that Britain, France and the US were negotiating among themselves the terms of the treaty. And he presents the German perspectives (sic) as how to n ...more
Michael Anderson
Jan 08, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: history-world
Detailed review of the Versailles Treaty and the mess it made.
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Charles L. Mee is an American playwright, historian and author known for his collage-like style of playwriting, which makes use of radical reconstructions of found texts. He is also a professor of theater at Columbia University. (Source: Wikipedia)