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Who's Gonna Take the Weight: Manhood, Race, and Power in America

3.62  ·  Rating details ·  52 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
“A mighty wind of fresh air. His pitiless self-examination—and his equally honest exploration of the racial, sexual, cultural, and class fault lines that thread our psychic and social landscape—is not only brave but necessary if our nation is to survive.”
—Michael Eric Dyson

“Kevin Powell is pushing to bring, as he has so brilliantly done before, the voices of his generation
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Paperback, 160 pages
Published December 18th 2007 by Three Rivers Press (first published August 19th 2003)
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thecatchmeifyoucan
Sep 19, 2014 rated it really liked it
The beginning of this book was a bit lost on me in that I found it difficult to get passed his ego and narcissism though parts of it contain harsh self-criticism it screams brat. It screams of a man who was outwardly an awful human being who has changed but is still driven by some of these awful ways.

His discussion of Tupac made me wish I was older during his brief stint here on earth. It made me want to dig into all of the old metaphorical crates and pull out each album and write about the imp
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Nicholas I. Wiggins
I'm a kevin powell fan...and did appreciate this book for being an interesting take on being male and being black. Adding the complexities of power struggle into the mix seemed like a unique way of taking on this subject but instead came off as a wannabe revolutionary text. A lot of good things that I pulled from it in individual sections but collectively was just okay.
Heather
Jul 15, 2007 rated it did not like it
This man is an outstanding public speaker but a very poor writer. Don't read books by former Real World cast members.
Dominick Brady
Jun 01, 2013 rated it really liked it
Didn't expect to enjoy this. I did.
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“To be sure, I had, and have, spent the better part of my post-college life growing up in the public eye, with my shameful warts, big and ugly, looming there for the world to see; and it has been a mighty battle trying to be a man, a Black man, a human being, a responsible and consistent human being, as I have interfaced with my past and with my personal demons, with friends and lovers, with enemies and haters. As Tupac Shakur once famously said to me, “There is no placed called careful.” On the one hand, Tupac was right: There is not much room for error in America if you are a Black male in a society ostensibly bent on profiling your every move, eager to capitalize on your falling into this or that trap, particularly keen to swoop down on your self-inflicted mishaps. But by the same token, Tupac was wrong: There can be a place called careful, once one becomes aware of the world one lives in, its potential, its limitations, and if one is willing to struggle to create a new model, some new and alternative space outside and away from the larger universe, where one can be free enough to comprehend that even if the world seems aligned against you, you do not have to give the world the rope to hang you with.” 12 likes
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