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Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation
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Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation

4.18  ·  Rating details ·  44 ratings  ·  11 reviews
On Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a "kneel-in" to protest the church's policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for more than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers.
In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the story
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Hardcover, 314 pages
Published October 25th 2012 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published September 11th 2012)
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Judy McCarver
Mar 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Haynes, a Rhodes College professor, highlights the segregation crisis of 1964-1965 in Protestant churches in the South by telling the story of the "Kneel-In" campaigns across the south, primarily composed of college age student protestors, particularly in Memphis and particularly at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a suburban wealthy white church, that actually started in downtown Memphis but as it grew, the church moved to the suburbs. I love this book for many reasons. Kneel-Ins were ...more
Kristen
A sobering but worthwhile read. Important history for those interested in race in the church broadly, but particularly in Memphis or conservative Presbyterian.
Drew
Jan 18, 2013 rated it really liked it
Very challenging read. I recommend every evangelical in Memphis at least read a few chapters of this book to become familiar with the story.

The first few chapters are excellent. While the middle section is excellent as well, it reads very much like a history textbook (which very well may have been the author's intention). Therefore, while it is thorough, it provides more details than are necessary for the overall scope of the narrative.

Like the first few chapters, the end of the book is very m
...more
Suzy
Aug 22, 2015 rated it liked it
I was keen on the subject matter because I didn't know anything about these protest prayer kneel-ins targeting segregated churches in the south. The book was full of detailed facts, dates, names etc and it followed several church congregations. For this reason I found it hard to identify with the individuals described. I didn't feel I really understood why they chose to act and who they were. In some instances we weren't even given the characters and the narrative describes the actions of "two b ...more
Mary Gail O'Dea
Dec 08, 2012 rated it really liked it
This is a good book on a topic about which I knew nothing before reading it. It talks about "kneel-ins" at southern churches between 1963-1965. African American ans white students went to southern churches on Sunday mornings, often being refused entry. The book focuses especially on Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis. In addition to telling the history of kneel-ins there, the author looks at the story from the perspective of protesters, clergy, congregants against segregation, those for segre ...more
Kathryn
Mar 11, 2013 rated it really liked it
A must-read for Memphians. Not terribly well- written, but the subject is absolutely compelling. It is a peek into the many many layers and variations of racial perspectives in the southern church in the mid-1960s. Haynes also identifies lingering ways that race plays a powerful, usually unnamed role in church politics. It was a disconcerting yet hopeful paradox.
TJ
Oct 27, 2012 rated it liked it
Shelves: history
Well researched and well written. Worth reading
Krista Jones
Sep 01, 2015 rated it really liked it
Particularly difficult for me to read. The church I attend began out of such an evil place of man's heart. Such important historical value for Memphis and Christians.
Julie Wright
Jul 25, 2013 rated it liked it
Interesting perspective on the Civil Rights Movement in Memphis from the religious point-of-view. At times, it felt very "text bookish." This made it a chore to read.
Pat Hardy
May 11, 2015 marked it as to-read
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Nov 27, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Very well-written and sobering account of an important part of our history.
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the 'civil rights movement' and theology 1 2 May 07, 2014 12:37PM  
“if we can’t worship the same God together inside the same church buildings, then we will still knock on your door and so irritate you thatyou cannot worship your white God in peace, that you cannot escape thinking about the problems of segregation even on Sunday morning, that we are just letting you know that every single aspect of your Southern Way of Life is under attack.” 1 likes
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