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Lud-in-the-Mist

3.85  ·  Rating details ·  3,388 Ratings  ·  385 Reviews
Lud-in-the-Mist, the capital city of the small country Dorimare, is a port at the confluence of two rivers, the Dapple and the Dawl. The Dapple has its origin beyond the Debatable Hills to the west of Lud-in-the-Mist, in Fairyland. In the days of Duke Aubrey, some centuries earlier, fairy things had been look upon with reverence, and fairy fruit was brought down the Dapple ...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published April 2008 by Victor Gollancz (first published 1926)
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Sandi
Feb 14, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy, 2009
30-odd years before Tolkein published “The Lord of the Rings”, a British woman named Hope Mirrlees wrote a fantasy called “Lud-in-the-Mist”. Neil Gaiman wrote an introduction to the edition I read and I can see that he meant every word. His own “Stardust” draws very heavily on “Lud-in-the-Mist”, especially in setting and tone. Other recent novels that are reminiscent of “Lud-in-the-Mist” are “Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” by Susannah Clarke and “Little, Big” by John Crowley. They all share ...more
reed
Jan 14, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Neil Gaiman raved about this book, so I read it. I wish I could have read it without knowing anything about it -- but I still liked it. It was written in the 1920's -- before fantasy tropes were so set in stone -- so it goes in directions you don't expect it to. Also, it's as though the author never heard of the idea that fantasy is a juvenile and disreputable genre, so she takes herself and her book seriously and uses fantasy to explore real and important ideas.
Tijana
Izgleda da je Lud-in-the-Mist (Lud u magli? Lad? Ko bi ga znao) najpoznatiji nepoznati fentezi. U tom smislu da je objavljen 1926. i da je njegova istinski ekscentrična (i jednako istinski bogata) autorka posle toga uglavnom batalila pisanje; možda je smatrala da je u dvadeset petoj rekla sve što je imala. I da je sledećih devedesetak godina njegov uticaj na fantastiku, naročito britansku, vrlo prisutan i vrlo skriven čak i onda kad pisci na koje je Houp Mirliz presudno uticala (recimo Nil Gejma ...more
Kate Sherrod
Mar 24, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Of course, I come to this novel via Tim Powers, who quoted it quite tantalizingly and memorably in Last Call as one to which Scott Crane and his late wife often referred in their intimate shorthand with one another. At one point Susan's ghost, or at least the chthonic spirt-of-alcohol that is impersonating Susan refers to "a blackish canary" ("canary" as in the sense of "a shade of yellow" rather than that of the bird of that name) as a way of commenting on Scott's refusal to grasp what is reall ...more
Oliviu Craznic
Feb 11, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy
An exquisite, well-written, fascinating fantasy - unfortunately, a very disappointing ending.
Or, should I say, very disappointing AFTER the ending, as the episode of Master Nathaniel meeting Duke Aubrey and finding the truth about Fairyland should have been the excellent ending of the book.
However, the author decided to write a few chapters more, and the conclusion was not at all fit for the story.
Worth reading, though. Could have been a masterpiece - it is, at the end of the day, just a fine b
...more
Jenna St Hilaire
This is a tale of the relationship between Fairyland and ordinary life, which puts it at the heart of my favorite storytelling traditions. Born during the late lifetime of fellow countryman George MacDonald (relevant works: Phantastes, Lilith), and just thirteen years younger than  G.K. Chesterton (Orthodoxy), Mirrlees seems to write under the guidance of the same muse that led them. It wouldn't surprise me if she were directly influenced by either one or both; nor would it surprise me if, like ...more
Phoenixfalls
I don't think I'm well-read enough to review this book -- as is the case with many British writers of that period, Mirrlees is far better classically educated than I am, and I'm sure I missed quite a few of her references. However, I now firmly agree with Neil Gaiman that this is "the single most beautiful, solid, unearthly, and unjustifiably forgotten novel of the twentieth century" so I felt I should attempt to review it here in the hopes that I get a few more people to seek it out.

This is mos
...more
Nikki
Jul 01, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I’ve been meaning to read Lud-in-the-Mist for ages and ages, and I don’t know why I didn’t get round to it sooner. It is classic fantasy; more like Lord Dunsany’s work than anything modern, though maybe Patricia McKillip might be a spiritual successor in some ways. The prose is glorious; it just feels warm and vivid, though honey-tinged in colour. I felt, reading it, like I could see the city of Lud; like I knew something of the dreams of its people, even if their daily lives were perhaps a litt ...more
Olivier Delaye
Neil Gaiman made me do it! Er, for those who don't know, Neil Gaiman touted Lud-in-the-mist as one of the best yet most overlooked Fantasy novels of the twentieth century, and in my humble opinion he slightly, just slightly, oversold it. Sure, it's a beautifully written book, and Fantasy notwithstanding, surprisingly timeless (actually, it's pretty hard to believe it was written in 1926!), but for some reason I found it a bit hard to get into the story and care for any of the characters. I appre ...more
Mike (the Paladin)
Nov 12, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fantasy
The people of Lud were...well, "Luddites". This book I read long ago and it is by turns very sad, very funny, and always mind tickling. This is one of those..if you can find it, "must reads" of fantasy. Of course some will disagree with me...but I'd say if you get the chance, read it.
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Hope Mirrlees was a British translator, poet and novelist. She is best known for the 1926 Lud-in-the-Mist, a fantasy novel and influential classic, and for Paris: A Poem, a modernist poem.
More about Hope Mirrlees...
“A house with old furniture has no need of ghosts to be haunted.” 24 likes
“Reason I know, is only a drug, and, as such, its effects are never permanent. But, like the juice of the poppy, it often gives a temporary relief.” 20 likes
More quotes…