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The Rich Don't Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class, 1900-1970
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The Rich Don't Always Win: The Forgotten Triumph over Plutocracy that Created the American Middle Class, 1900-1970

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4.50  ·  Rating details ·  56 ratings  ·  8 reviews
The Occupy Wall Street protests have captured America's political imagination. Polls show that two-thirds of the nation now believe that America's enormous wealth ought to be "distributed more evenly." However, almost as many Americans — well over half — feel the protests will ultimately have "little impact" on inequality in America. What explains this disconnect? Most Ame ...more
Paperback, 384 pages
Published November 27th 2012 by Seven Stories Press (first published January 1st 2012)
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David Jedeikin
Aug 29, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Excellent analysis of how America went from a plutocracy to a more egalitarian society and back again. Definitely slanted, but nevertheless an important counterweight to all the free-market fundamentalism that's been de rigueur in this country for more than 30 years.
Catherine
Dec 07, 2012 rated it really liked it
There are some truth that many don't know in this book!
Corbin
Mar 01, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: on-history
A must read: chronicles the (successful and doomed) fight of the 99% of Americans struggling against the tyranny of wealthy plutocrats controlling the country from 1900 to today.
Justin Podur
Jul 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Great and timely. This book focuses on two things: the right to organize in unions and taxation (specifically, the progressiveness of taxes). We can track the power of plutocracy based on the status of these two metrics. And based on these two metrics, plutocracy is doing better now than it has in a very long time. Which is why Pizzigati's book about how victories were won against plutocracy in the last century is so important. One thing that this book shares with Radicals in Power is the sense ...more
Robert
May 13, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This book should be required reading for anyone who is confused and upset about why the United States today seems to be rigged against the middle class, and who feels like things used to be better.

Pizzigati documents how the US was in the exact same place in the early 20th century as it is today: corrupt politicians, massive inequality, stagnating wages. But by the 1950s, all of this had reversed, and the US had created the first mass middle class in the world. That didn't happen by magic: Pizz
...more
Randall Snyder
Mar 13, 2013 rated it it was amazing
My sister told me I'm trying too hard to save the world in too many different ways. She's probably right. But when you learn something is bad and you don't try to do something about it, at least share the information, you become an accomplice.

I finished reading "The Rich Don't Always Win" a few days ago. If you've followed my posts on G+ and FB you'll recognize my enthusiasm from the number of times I've posted about it as I was reading it.

This collection of historical records should be taught
...more
Mike
Jan 03, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Those of whom I would really like to see read this book would probably denounce every fact that Sam Pizzigati carefully references in the history of inequality and the labor forces that have tried to eliminate it and have imposed push backs over time. There is no denial of a link between inequality of wealth and economic peril, and Mr. Perrigati tells us why. Every conservative red herring is tossed aside as tax rates, organized labor, and plutocratic control are wrestled with and pinned to the ...more
John
Jan 13, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Read this book. Our American predecessors fought the same fights we are fighting today about banana-republic-style wealth trends and what should be done about it. Fascinating stuff, well told.
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How to spread the word about this book? 2 7 Jul 25, 2013 10:48AM  
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Sam Pizzigati, an Institute for Policy Studies associate fellow, has been writing about inequality in America since the early 1990s. A veteran labor journalist, Pizzigati has edited national publications for four different U.S. trade unions. He currently writes for the OtherWords media service and co-edits Inequality.org, the Institute for Policy Studies weekly on maldistributed income and wealth ...more