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O Décimo Terceiro Conto

3.95  ·  Rating details ·  234,585 Ratings  ·  19,821 Reviews
O Décimo Terceiro Conto narra o encontro de duas mulheres: Margaret, jovem, filha de um alfarrabista, biógrafa amadora, e Vida Winter, escritora famosa, que, sentindo aproximar-se o final dos seus dias, convida a primeira para escrever a sua biografia.
Na sua casa de campo, a escritora decide contar a verdadeira história da sua vida, revelando um passado misterioso e cheio
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Paperback, , 366 pages
Published March 6th 2012 by Marcador (first published September 12th 2006)
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C. Not squeezing technology into everything we do, does not imply an old era. I make notes by hand and read real books. I never doubted we were meeting…moreNot squeezing technology into everything we do, does not imply an old era. I make notes by hand and read real books. I never doubted we were meeting the biographer in 2006: publication time! Although households started to have PCs by 2000, the internet was only dial-up. It's still dial-up in rural communities, like mine! Books and newspapers remain invaluable to researchers of any era. Internet articles are only as sound as the people who input them.

Our best indicator of 2006 is the baby born before the sisters vacated that house! He is seemingly only a little older than the protagonist he befriends. I believe even the town doctor and ex-house manager were alive. If doc and the research lady were 30 when Vida was 10 or more, there are fewer than 20 years between them. I put Vida at age 65. She and her sister perished from diseases rather than ancient age, despite having the air of being older. If we subtract 55 years from 2006 to get Vida at age 10: 1951. If they left at about age 20, it was circa 1961 and the baby is 45 in 2006. That's my detecting effort! :-)(less)
Terri Wyatt The first time I "read" this book, it was the unabridged audio book. At that time, I had a ridiculous commute: 62 miles EACH WAY! So, I listened to a…moreThe first time I "read" this book, it was the unabridged audio book. At that time, I had a ridiculous commute: 62 miles EACH WAY! So, I listened to a LOT of audio books for those years. I must say that the audio version of The Thirteenth Tale is the best-produced audio book I've ever read. Two different actresses are used: one representing Margaret, which is the primary voice; and one to represent Vida Winter as she is telling her story to Margaret. The actresses selected -- and their portrayals -- are spot on! Even if you've read this book with your eyes, I would recommend listening to the audio book if you have the time. You will thoroughly enjoy every second!(less)

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Kristina A
Jul 06, 2007 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: neo-victorian
Sigh. I really, really wanted to like this book. I heard good things about it, and it has many elements I usually love in a novel: a Victorian sensibility, questions of identity and sisterhood (as well as siblinghood generally), meta-commentary on writing, and a plain, quiet, somewhat chilly protagonist who prefers books to people. The protagonist, Margaret, grew up in a bookstore and learned to read using 19th century novels, and there are clear parallels in the story to Jane Eyre, Wuthering He ...more
Emily May
“There is something about words. In expert hands, manipulated deftly, they take you prisoner. Wind themselves around your limbs like spider silk, and when you are so enthralled you cannot move, they pierce your skin, enter your blood, numb your thoughts. Inside you they work their magic.”

I don't know if I've ever loved words so much.

Lots of people told me that this was a book I needed to read, but many of those people also warned me that I might find it slow. So I went into The Thirteenth Ta
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Lisa M.
Sep 13, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

"Do you know the feeling when you start reading a new book before the membrane of the last one has had time to close behind you? You leave the previous book with ideas and themes–characters even–caught in the fibers of your clothes, and when you open the new book, they are still with you"


This quote from The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield sums up my experience with the book. It’s been a while since I’ve felt truly drawn in to a novel. Likely this is the result of my recent tendency toward s
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Navessa

"Tell me the truth."


These are the words that a young journalist speaks to Vida Winter in the beginning of this book. Vida is an author famous for spinning magical tales. In books, and about her life. Each time she releases a new story, she grants multiple interviews, in which every journalist asks her the story of her life, and leaves thinking that they, finally, after decades of deceptions, are the one she's told the truth to.

But she never does. Until now.

Out of the blue, she writes to an a
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Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads
Reviewed by: Rabid Reads

So here's my problem with gothic literature: it's so habitually grotesque that it's predictable.

If there's not incest, there's a crazy wife in the attic. If there's not a crazy wife in the attic, there's a murderous illegitimate son who's not right in the head. Or conjoined twins. Or a dying gypsy's curse. Or something equally unsettling.

So even if you guess the HEP Big Secret wrong, whatever it actually is isn't going to make a dent. B/c you've already imagined the worst
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Libby
Jul 20, 2008 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I know that most people like to work out to Gnarls Barkley or Metallica or what-have-you, but I find gym-based exercise so exceedingly boring that I require narrative to keep me going. Since my motor-coordination isn't sufficient enough to allow me to turn the pages of a magazine/book AND pump the pedals on an elliptical trainer, sometime last summer I turned to Audible to solve my problems. Now, what one requires from printed matter may not at all do for the recorded book, and in my case, it tu ...more
Rachel Burton
Oct 24, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: general-fiction, 2007
This has finally come out in paperback. This is that one that got an £800,000 advance and is meant to be the best book since sliced bread. To be honest I don't hold out a lot of hope....

On P. 138
I take it back. I have been sucked in straight away. Can barely put it down! Whiich is apt seeing as amonst other things it is the tale of books and their words sucking you in. It is also the tale of a dying writer and her reluctant biography, lost twins and the ghosts of the past. Like The House at Rive
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Amalia Gavea
''We live like latecomers at the theatre; we must catch up as best we can, dividing the beginning from the shape of later events.''

The Thirteenth Tale had been ''waiting'' in my TBR list for almost two years, before I finally decided to start reading it. It proved to be a rare bibliophile's experience.

In the Gothic Literature group October Reading and in a recent discussion with a friend in Goodreads, I described Diane Setterfield's novel as foreboding. Each scene, each sentence is a creation
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Jean
The Thirteenth Tale is a gothic suspense novel from 2006 with echoes from several Victorian novels. The familiar device of a "story within a story" is employed, and sometimes it even contains another story. This story-telling tradition strongly reminds the reader of earlier classic tales. In fact the "rule of threes" goes throughout this book echoing its fairytale feel. There is the structure of the book itself, "Beginnings, Middles and Endings". There are three generations in the earlier sag ...more
Florence (Lefty) MacIntosh
Jul 20, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: fans of SUSPENSE!
Recommended to Florence (Lefty) by: Book Club
Amazing for a debut! While a homage to classic gothic novels no need to be a fan - pick it up if you’re into mysteries with plenty of psychological twists, ambiance and above all – suspense! Setterfield excels in the slow build, at stringing you along, feeding you morsels bit by tantalizing bit…almost toys with you until you grow impatient, at least I did. About 1/3 of the way in I reconciled myself to the fact that she insisted on setting her own pace and simply would not be rushed. That’s when ...more
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“…a mistress of the craft of storytelling.”
The Guardian

Diane Setterfield is a British author. Her bestselling novel, The Thirteenth Tale (2006) was published in 38 countries worldwide and has sold more than three million copies. It was number one in the New York Times hardback fiction list for three weeks and is enjoyed as much for being ‘a love letter to reading’ as for its mystery and style. Her
...more
More about Diane Setterfield...
“People disappear when they die. Their voice, their laughter, the warmth of their breath. Their flesh. Eventually their bones. All living memory of them ceases. This is both dreadful and natural. Yet for some there is an exception to this annihilation. For in the books they write they continue to exist. We can rediscover them. Their humor, their tone of voice, their moods. Through the written word they can anger you or make you happy. They can comfort you. They can perplex you. They can alter you. All this, even though they are dead. Like flies in amber, like corpses frozen in the ice, that which according to the laws of nature should pass away is, by the miracle of ink on paper, preserved. It is a kind of magic.” 1707 likes
“There is something about words. In expert hands, manipulated deftly, they take you prisoner. Wind themselves around your limbs like spider silk, and when you are so enthralled you cannot move, they pierce your skin, enter your blood, numb your thoughts. Inside you they work their magic.” 1545 likes
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