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To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation

3.97  ·  Rating details ·  39 Ratings  ·  12 Reviews
To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation is the first of three tracts written by Martin Luther in 1520. In this work, he defined for the first time the signature doctrines of the Priesthood of all believers and the two kingdoms.
Published 1520
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Seth Holler
Jun 2015. Hearty good sense. Entertaining. Some doubtful argument. Used Wace and Buchheim's edition, the bulk of which is excerpted in Classics of Western Thought Series: Middle Ages, Renaissance and Reformation, Volume II.

Nov 2016. Rereading to teach; less doubtful than I remember.
Brit
Dec 25, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Martin Luther is fairly easy to read. This book gives a good understanding of his thoughts, reasoning and priorities.
Kevin Lara
Mar 16, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I found in this treatise a great gateway, although limited, into Luther's mind and thinking and eve feelings for his nation. He addresses to the nobility of the nation and all o the ills that have come upon them from falling into the hands of Rome. His passion is seen in his words, sometimes made me feel what I thought he was feeling as he penned them.

Although there is a great deal of theological discussion and exegetical, there is also a great deal of politics and economics. I was astonished by
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Carlyn Cole
Mar 18, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Obviously written in a different time and place, yet the admonitions ring clear. A great read on how to address current issues with the insight of Scripture.
Bookshark
It's probably no surprise that I enjoyed this more than reading Augustine or Aquinas; you can really see some of the radical elements that will come to shake the Western world in this text. There were a few things I learned about Luther's ideas from this text that were new to me. For instance, this call for the princes to oppose the church and call a new council is clearly contrary to everything I've been told about how Luther only wanted to "reform" the Church. True, the reformation he is calli ...more
Robert Tessmer
Nov 13, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interesting historical work. The book helped me to "get into the mind" of Luther and try to understand the world he live in and the goals he had in mind. It is a short read and I found it very easy to understand.

The year 1520 saw the publication of the three great documents which laid down the fundamental principles of the Reformation. In the "Address to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation," Luther attacked the corruptions of the Church and the abuses of its authority, and asserted the r
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Scott Harris
Reading Martin Luther's works is always an insightful exercise, both into the mind of this historical giant and into the evolution of the social, ecclesiological and theogical thinking that was occurring in the 16th century. His thoughts on the marriage of the clergy which dominate the second half of this volume are intriguing and remind readers of the force of emotion that accompanied such issues throughout history.
Cody Smith
Didactic and simple. His hyperbole and melodrama, though, were extremely entertaining. If you are thinking of reading this, a drinking game would be to take a drink every time Luther calls the pope the Antichrist. I had to read this book for class.
Eli
Nov 01, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
For anyone interested in Reformation history, this is a must read. Luther is a bit too political for my liking, though hearing him talk about his nations political situation is fascinating. The first chapter on the three walls of Romanism is timeless and classic. I cheered!
Dan
Oct 21, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love Martin's easy to understand metaphors and analogies. He blows the pope in context out of the water here. Also, you can see how MLK was inspired by him simply by reading this theology. Empowering.
Tim
Apr 03, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book needs to be read by ministers, political, and academic leaders alike. There is much to be learned from this writing that befits our current generation across religious, governmental, academic and economic parameters.
Jeremy
Didn't read this edition; I have my own PDF. Read again for prelims on March 4-5, 2015.
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Martin Luther was a German monk, theologian, university professor and church reformer whose ideas inspired the Protestant Reformation and changed the course of Western civilization.

Luther's theology challenged the authority of the papacy by holding that the Bible is the only infallible source of religious authority and that all baptized Christians under Jesus are a spiritual priesthood. According
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