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Maura pēdējā nopūta

3.92  ·  Rating details ·  10,986 Ratings  ·  525 Reviews
Salmans Rušdi (Salman Rushdie, 1947) ieguva pasaules slavu ar savu otro romānu “Pusnakts bērni” (1981). Gadu gaitā tam sekojuši vairāki citi romāni, kas labi pazīstami arī latviešu lasītājiem (“Zeme zem viņas kājām”, “Niknums”, “Klauns Šalimars” u. c.)

Romānā “Maura pēdējā nopūta” (1995) atainota Zogoibi dzimtas vēsture četrās paaudzēs – spilgts, paradoksāls, aizkustinošs
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Hardcover, 527 pages
Published 1999 by Apgāds "ATĒNA" (first published 1995)
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Kalliope
This is another hard book to rate and review. Rushdie is a smart, ingenious and purposeful writer. Everything is cleverly thought out and his use of language is magical. He bends the words with ease and brings out richer meanings. The plot is an original story that unfolds as a series of riddles to a satirical account of modern India.

Yet, in spite of all that, the book did not click with me.

The characters remain puppets. As exotic cartoons they act out a sort of fable that sometimes appears wit
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Giedre
I admit that I had already given The Moor‘s Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie a couple of unsuccessful tries before I finally challenged myself to reading it in one go a couple of weeks ago. It seemed just the right time to plunge into something by Rushdie after I unexpectedly met him at a conference he was giving in Madrid as part of the World Book Day celebration.

And yes, it was a big challenge. If one can love and hate a book at the same time, admire and despise it, crave for more and wish to fini
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Andy Jacobs
Jan 12, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Gripping and whimsical story spanning a century of one Indian family's business, artistic, and leisure endeavors. Rushdie's writing is like candy, with sweet turns-of-phrase and quirky Dickensian characters, leaving the reader craving the next page. With Garcia Marquez-ish elements of magical realism and a pervading sinister feeling, like Dumas.
Agnes
Aug 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Review part 1 - https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

So don’t let Rushdie fool you into thinking that “it is Moor/Zogoiby’s story and heck!, they’re somewhat flat, or Rushdie makes an allegory and fails on both counts – both the upperstory and understory are not
well-developed – happens when you want to ride two horses at once.” But, oh, dear, it is one horse, not two.

*sigh* this review just doesn’t end. But Rushdie is a crazy fellow, maker of an atom bomb – large scale destruction squeezed
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Lit Bug
Oct 17, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
1st part of the review - https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

So don’t let Rushdie fool you into thinking that “it is Moor/Zogoiby’s story and heck!, they’re somewhat flat, or Rushdie makes an allegory and fails on both counts – both the upperstory and understory are not
well-developed – happens when you want to ride two horses at once.” But, oh, dear, it is one horse, not two.

*sigh* this review just doesn’t end. But Rushdie is a crazy fellow, maker of an atom bomb – large scale destruction
...more
مروان البلوشي
هل هذه الرواية هي أفضل ما كتبه سلمان رشدي؟.. لا أدري ولكنها مزيج ساحر وباهر جدا من الواقعية السحرية (سلمان رشدي هو أحد أساتذة هذا الفن مع ماركيز وغونتر غراس وميخائيل بولغاكوف) والملاحم العائلية اللذيذة والميلودرامية وتمتزج مع أسلوب سلمان رشدي الفكاهي والمضحك في تناول تفاصيل التاريخ الهندي من بعد الاستقلال عن بريطانيا. أظن أن هناك ترجمة عربية صدرت حديثا، أتمنى أن تكون أمينة لجمال وذكاء النص الأصلي.

أنصح بها.
Agnes
Aug 07, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The Moor’s Last Sigh is a colorful, hard-hitting excursion into India. Squeezed into a paperback, it spans nearly a century, and through the tumultuous history of the Zogoibys as they enlarge their pepper trade in Cochin (wasn’t it with spices, the ‘hot’ pepper that it all started?) to a national scale diversification of all kinds of ‘spices’ of life, cruising through the intense political scenes of Independence movement to newly-acquired freedom to communal bloodshed to Indira Gandhi-led Emerge ...more
Russ
Jul 09, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, 20thcentury
The Moor's Last Sigh is Rushdie's best book since Midnight's Children and is superior to The Ground Beneath Her Feet. Rushdie puts his spin on the multi-generational family novel. Like most such novels, it takes awhile to get the characters and families straight, but once you have the whole picture, you can begin to enjoy the magic that Rushdie is weaving through this genre. His first-person narrator ranges from funny to absurd to cruel, and Rushdie's playfulness with language is in full force h ...more
Orionisisgray
I almost stopped reading this a number of times, but I have a thing about finishing books. Salman Rushdie is one wordy motherfucker, the opposite of what I tend to enjoy. He's all for the word play, the linguistic jokes, the rhyming slang and colorful Indian colloquialisms, which are cute for a while but wear thin. His narrative is baroque, dripping with dramatic asides and rhetorical questions to the reader, teasing hooks, and a number of other devices I don't enjoy.

Still, I am interested in I
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Robert
Jan 17, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
This is my favorite of Rushdie's. It combines the lyrical mysticism of Midnight's Children with the hard-nosed magical-realism of the "present-day" sections of The Satanic Verses. I found Midnight's Children to have an almost apocolyptic feeling about it, especially in the later chapters -- this is hardly a knock against it. But I feel like The Moor's Last Sigh, while it certainly comes to a climactic head much as Midnight's Children, does so in a way that you feel is, I suppose, more thematical ...more
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Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist. Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent. His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western world.

His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several coun
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More about Salman Rushdie...
“A sigh isn't just a sigh. We inhale the world and breathe out meaning. While we can. While we can.” 90 likes
“We crave permission openly to become our secret selves.” 68 likes
More quotes…