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Die 27ste Stadt
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Die 27ste Stadt

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3.12  ·  Rating details ·  3,704 Ratings  ·  368 Reviews
Martin Probst lebt den amerikanischen Traum. Von den bescheidenen Anfängen im deutschen Viertel von St. Louis gelang dem Bauunternehmer mit Beharrlichkeit, Fleiß und Durchsetzungskraft der Aufstieg in die höchsten Kreise der Stadt im Mittelwesten der USA. Als Erbauer von "The Arch", dem monumentalen Wahrzeichen von St. Louis, genießt Probst höchstes Ansehen und wird von se ...more
Paperback, 670 pages
Published 2005 by Rowohlt (first published 1988)
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Darwin8u
Aug 29, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2014
“The guiding principle of Martin’s personality, the sum of his interior existence, was the desire to be left alone.

Franzen

If all those years he’d sought attention, even novelty, and if he still relished them, then that was because attention proved him different and solitude begins in difference.”
― Jonathan Franzen, The Twenty-Seventh City

Franzen's freshman effort is striking. First, just one long gaze at the picture of Franzen on the back and it makes me think this kid must have been gnawing on ideas
...more
Jessica
Aug 28, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a big weird book, and the first novel I've been able to get into after a depressing reading rut. For some reason every reviewer on here seems to have hated or at least been disappointed by this book, but I thought it was a fun and unexpectedly bizarre read. Sure, it sagged a bit in the middle, but what 500 page book doesn't? I really haven't been able to get into any fiction in ages, and I wolfed this thing down in three days, looked forward to picking it up when I had to put it down and ...more
Billy
Jul 07, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Jonathan Franzen
Hmm. It's hard to say this, since Jonathan Franzen has more talent in writing than I will ever have even tying my shoes. But compared to "Strong Motion" and "The Corrections", this book is tiresome, and falls unmistakably short of its ambitions. There are some hints of his gift (on more consistent display in later works) for hyper-perceptive and realistic accounts of the moment-by-moment consciousness of his characters; if only his regard for his characters in this one were more evenly distribut ...more
Chris
Aug 05, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book held a very intersting ballance between being a page-turning thriller and a slow-paced, almost boring novel of mid-city civics. Franzen's first novel, it should have replaced the map of St. Louis with a chart of characters, a la most Tolstoy translations; the geography never was quite as confusing as the fifty+ main characters, their relationships, and which corperations or city office they controlled.

The plot is oddly conservative, centering around a plot by foreign (Indian) investors
...more
Andrew
Let's talk about the comparisons between two of my favorite writers of the present era, Jonathan Franzen and David Foster Wallace. Both write great, sprawling novels that, while epically long, aren't very difficult. Both express the unique anxieties and lonelinesses of our present era, and will both probably be remembered by future scholars as representative writers of our times. But in both cases, their first novels were really pretty weak. The Broom of the System feels like a young writer's ra ...more
Mattia Ravasi
Sep 28, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Featured in my Top 5 Jonathan Franzen Books: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKJrZ...
Video-review: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68qnEs...

An incredible debut novel, a wonderfully Pynchonian work, and proof that Franzen can be awesome even with something different from the Midwestern Family Saga.
Holly
Jul 28, 2011 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, hated-it
There should be a symbol for 'hated it.' One of the worst books I have ever read. Pretentious, agonizing, worthless, populated with extremely boring characters (in my opinion). What is it about? Some uninteresting combination of St Louis, Indian nationals, immigration and terrorism, a metaphorical story about metaphors, and Jonathan Franzen's love for his own vocabulary (or his thesaurus). I was actually angry at myself for finishing it, the Bataan Death March of books. If I ever read another Jo ...more
Nicole
Mar 18, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: ownbooks2017
This was a huge mess, albeit a promising and fairly enjoyable one.
Franzen had been reading Pynchon, clearly, and he was ambitious in the best possible way. For a first novel, it's pretty decent.

It's interesting to see him write in this mode, also, having read later efforts that have taken him far away into nuanced characters, family dynamics, and larger and easier to follow narrative chunks. Part of me is a little sad, actually, that he abandoned this mode for that other one, though I certainl
...more
Kiof
Jan 02, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fake review: How can someone so obviously intelligent be a mere transcriber of platitudes? (quote from the book, btw). Real review: One of the trademarks of Franzens writing is the aftertaste of cynicism readily apparent in every one of his rather brilliant psychological insights. So it is hard for the reader not to treat his work with a similair level of hypercriticism.
Like how the friend who makes you laugh the most isnt neccesarily going to be a great stand up comedian, so every man or woman
...more
Lori
Dec 08, 2010 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Hey, uh, Jonathan, I'd like my week back. That week I spent reading this piece of you-know-what? I know, I know, I read you backwards. Totally my mistake. I started with The Corrections several years ago, which I dearly loved. Then I read Strong Motion, which wasn't nearly as satisfying, but was still a worthwhile read. And now this. I stuck with this one to the very end because Strong Motion redeemed itself only in its latter pages. I kept thinking, okay, Jonathan, tie up a few of those loose e ...more
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Jonathan Franzen is the author of The Corrections, winner of the 2001 National Book Award for fiction; the novels The Twenty-Seventh City and Strong Motion; and two works of nonfiction, How to Be Alone and The Discomfort Zone, all published by FSG. His fourth novel, Freedom, was published in the fall of 2010.

Franzen's other honors include a 1988 Whiting Writers' Award, Granta's Best Of Young Ameri
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More about Jonathan Franzen...
“The guiding principle of Martin’s personality, the sum of his interior existence, was the desire to be left alone. If all those years he’d sought attention, even novelty, and if he still relished them, then that was because attention proved him different and solitude begins in difference.” 4 likes
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