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I Have the Right to Be a Child
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I Have the Right to Be a Child

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4.31  ·  Rating details ·  271 ratings  ·  99 reviews
With a very simple text accompanied by rich, vibrant illustrations a young narrator describes what it means to be a child with rights -- from the right to food, water and shelter, to the right to go to school, to be free from violence, to breathe clean air, and more. The book emphasizes that these rights belong to every child on the planet, whether they are "black or white ...more
Hardcover, 48 pages
Published June 1st 2012 by Groundwood Books (first published May 1st 2011)
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Average rating 4.31  · 
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Kris
Apr 15, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
Good intentions, appealing art, and some awkward wording that could come from this originally being written in French. Overall, this is a message book, and it is a necessary message. Heavy-handed in parts, but seriously, how embarrassing is it that the United States is the only eligible nation that has not ratified this basic document on human rights for children? Most nations did it back in 1989. Time to get on it, ‘Merica.
Canadian Reader
Jan 13, 2015 rated it liked it
This is an attractive picture book which colourfully conveys the key tenets of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to a young audience. One wonders, however, whether another such book was really necessary. We already have National Geographic's very attractive photo-essay, Every Human Has Rights, and publisher Red Fox's For Every Child. For those who wish for a little more informational weight, we have David J. Smith's This Child, Every Child to do that. Having said that, thi ...more
Edward Sullivan
A powerful and inspiring introduction to the concept of human rights, specifically those of children as stated in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is pathetic and shameful that the United States is one of three UN member nations that is not party to the convention.
Jessa Magbanua
Nov 27, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: multi-cultural
This book is absolutely adorable. I Have the Right to Be a Child is a very eye opening children's book. It addresses that issue that all children deserve equal rights and access to things all around the world. Children are more vulnerable than adults and can not always stand up for themselves. Children in the United States do not always know all the things they have and sometimes take them for granted. This would be a great book to read to children to remind them of all the things they have here ...more
Alicia Harlington
Apr 15, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: children-s-books
I Have the Right to Be a Child written by Alain Serres and Illustrated by Aurelia Fronty is an incredible story about children’s rights. From the intense opening affirmation, "I am a child with eyes, hands, a voice, a heart, and rights," to the earnest closing plea, "We need our rights to be respected now—today," this primer welcomes young readers to consider their universal rights as children as encapsulated in the Unified Nations Convention regarding the Rights of the Child. There is something ...more
Brittany Martz
Sep 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: diversity
This book talks about all the rights that a child has. It does not matter what color, gender, or economic status a person is. The important part is that we are all free to live in a place that has so many opportunities. The book starts with small things that matter like basic basic body parts. The child talks about having eyes, hands, a voice, a heart, and rights. As the book continues, the people in her life are talked about and the items that she experiences in her daily life that she is thank ...more
Jj
This is a nice book and I cannot say I disagree with its aims, but honestly "We Are All Born Free: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Pictures" does a far superior take on this material. This book was originally published in French, so perhaps it has lost something in translation. The illustrations are fine, but not what I would call inspiring, and something about the palette overall is on the dreary side.

I also, quite honestly, find the note on the second to last page to be a bit much
...more
Salina King
Dec 09, 2014 added it
Shelves: t-l-307
I have the right to be a child is a book that explains that regardless of what race, religion, age or any other characteristic that makes someone different does not change the fact that they have the right to have food, water, shelter and other necessities to live. The book shows that the UN has put out a treaty that clearly states that all the human rights for children are equal throughout the entire world and everyone needs to follow this. This book would be a great way to show how similar peo ...more
Alaina Kozma
Apr 30, 2016 rated it liked it
Well-intentioned, awkwardly done. Attempts at lightening this book's serious subjects were too intrusively random. This is one of many picture books that makes me wish the publishing market would just own up to the truth and sell work of this type to ADULTS. Unless you really want to read a story book about guided missiles and smart bombs to young children....

So why 3 stars instead of 2? Because I learned, reading this book, that the United States, Somalia, and Sudan are the only 3 members of th
...more
anna marie
Jun 15, 2016 rated it it was amazing
this is super totally gorgeous 800% recommend
K
Oct 15, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Former President of the United States Jimmy Carter says in his book, A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power that the biggest reason women don't pursue their human rights is because they don't know them. And once women and children do know their rights, they pursue them immediately.

Which begs the question: do all the children in your circle know their human rights? Why not ensure they do by giving this picture book and others like it as a baby shower gift? While there are other pi
...more
Leonard
Mar 21, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This book should be required reading for every child and every parent. It's a child's book. You can read it in less than 5 minutes, so there are no acceptable excuses! This is a reminder of how important people and their right are for safe and healthy growth, learning, and living. If children are reminded throughout childhood of their rights and what they deserve to have they will grow to be responsible tolerate and productive adults. This book is based on the United Nations Convention on the Ri ...more
Melissa
Jul 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is a non-fiction book that was originally written in French in 2009 and subsequently translated to English in 2012 with a grant from the Canadian Government. This book is truly beautiful. The illustrations are paintings. They are very simple, you can see the individual brush strokes and the pictures add to and illuminate the words on the page. Each page states the rights each child has and is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the child. At the time of the writing of th ...more
Sabrina Osman
I Have the Right to be a Child is a children’s picture book simply about a child having the right be a child. It talks about all diverse children have the equal right of doing things. For example, every child has the right to go to school, every child has the right to eat, and every child has the right to sleep in a bed. This is all basic things of life, but not every child gets that. The storyline highlights this issue and gives several examples throughout the story. Furthermore, the illustrati ...more
Maddi Holmes
Nov 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I would recommend this book for the primary grades, second through third grade. I would categorize it as a informational nonfiction book.

This book was very impactful for me. This is a great book to have on a classroom book shelf for students to look at throughout the day. This is a fabulous book for professional development. Sometimes when we get into the crazy part of the school year, we forget that our students are still children. This book takes you back to the basics and talks about all of t
...more
Rachel Hutsell
Dec 02, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Genre: Informational
Grade: Primary
I love this book! It is so important for children to know that they have rights in this world and what those rights are. Children should be informed of the rights that they have. This book touches deep and every child is able to connect and relate to some part of this book. I think that the connections that children can feel with this book helps children process and understand the world around them as well as any challenges/issues that they are going through. It
...more
Ann Douglas
Dec 28, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: kidlit, read-in-2018
A picture book that is designed to explain the principles contained in The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in language a young child can understand. I love the intention of this book, but sometimes the text misses the mark. ("I am afraid of guided missiles and smart bombs." "I have the right to be helped by my parents, my friends and my country...if my body doesn't work as well as other children's.") ...more
Carlie Johnson
Nov 11, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Grade: 1-3
Genre: nonfiction
Review: I thought this book was interesting because you don’t think about the different right that children from other countries do or don’t have. I think it’s grade that many countries now have all of these law or rules. One that shocked me says something like “I have a right to have a last name.” I didn’t know that some people from different countries don’t have last names.
Alissa Weiss
Apr 22, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Genre: Informal
Grade Level: Pre-K-2nd grade

I Have The Right to Be a Child by Alain Serres is a an empowering book for young and older children. The book uses colorful illustrations to depict every basic human right for children. Children are the future of all countries. They should be viewed valued because they are still people and our future. I think this book should be ratified in all countries including the United States.
Marilyn Showalter
Nov 12, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Informational
All grades reading level
I really appreciated the message that this book had. I think that it is important that children know about how they should be treated. I think this book would be good to be read to all ages of students because it shares with them a new perspective of things that they might not be concerned about that other students might struggle with.
Virginia
This book tells and shows in simple words and pictures what all children should have a right to, regardless of where they live, their gifts and their struggles, their religion, their race, or anything else. It is based on the Convention on the Rights of the Child that was adopted by the United Nations in 1989, and was adopted by almost all the United Nations' countries at the time. ...more
Carly Bontrager
Nov 15, 2019 rated it really liked it
Informational
K-6th
I really enjoyed this book. It made me think more about the rights that children have. After reading, many of them left me surprised that children didn’t have those rights before. I think this is a great book to read to children and to help them understand the rights that they have.
Amanda Geske
Feb 17, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: children-s-books
Powerful book that unequivocally states the rights of children according to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. I yarfed at the page that describes disability as a "body [that] doesn't work as well as other children's." This can be a good affirmation and empowerment read. ...more
Lindsey
Aug 25, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child written so kids can understand! Great information at the end of the book for extension and a list of countries who are party to the Convention. It’s a shame the Is is not involved. Gorgeous pictures, also!!
Stephanie
Oct 22, 2018 rated it really liked it
Based on the United Nations convention on the rights of a child. It does reference being afraid of guided missiles and smart bombs, so some parents could have concerns if used as a read aloud for younger grades.
Rachel
Apr 21, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Nonfiction
K-5th grade
This is such a good book for students to learn about their rights, even as a child. It’s very simple yet still gets the point across. It’s beautifully written for younger students to understand the different rights that they have.
Emily Dougherty
Dec 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing
o This book warms the heart of anyone who reads it. The thing that amazed me is all of the things that children in other countries are not just given. It made me more appreciative of all the things I do have.
o Contemporary Realistic Fiction
o Grades 1-4
Kristen
Mar 09, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great book except I think it is fun to dance “alone”. I was really surprised to find out at the end of the book that the USA is one of the few countries who has not ratified the UNCRC (The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child).
Victoria Martin
Since the book was published in 2009, I looked into whether the US has since ratified the entire Convention on the Rights of the Child (discussed in the book the difference between signing and actually ratifying) ...nope, not yet. That makes me super sad.
Abbie Gerig
Dec 02, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children-lit
Genre: Informational
Grades: Pre K-2

Topics such as the rights of children are not normally put in a picture book for kids to read, but I'm glad it was. There were many rights that I didn't even think were actual rights of children. So this is a good book to have on a classroom bookshelf so that children can learn about the rights they do have.
...more
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Alain Serres was once a kindergarten teacher who was inspired by his young students to write children’s books. He has since published more than one hundred titles for children of all ages, many of which have been translated into other languages. Alain founded the highly regarded French publishing house Rue du Monde, whose mission is to provide children with books that allow them to question and im ...more

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