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The Cunning Man (Toronto Trilogy #2)

3.91  ·  Rating details ·  2,307 Ratings  ·  152 Reviews

"Should I have taken the false teeth?" This is what Dr. Jonathan Hullah, a former police surgeon, thinks after he watches Father Hobbes die in front of the High Altar at Toronto's St. Aidan's on the morning of Good Friday. How did the good father die? We do not learn the answer until the last pages of this "Case Book" of a man's rich and highly observant life. But we learn

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Published 1996 by Penguin Group (first published 1994)
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Wendell
Jul 18, 2009 rated it liked it
I’ve been an avid, even proselytic fan of Robertson Davies for more than 20 years, and was delighted to discover that this novel (his last) had somehow slipped by me and that there was still more Davies to read. Sadly, The Cunning Man is a let-down—a book that demonstrates, more than anything, an act of literary onomatopoeia: a novel about an elderly man contemplating a life’s worth of memories and trying to position himself philosophically and existentially as he nears the end of his own story, ...more
Paul Secor
I'd read a number of Robertson Davies' novels before this one, but The Cunning Man is by far my favorite - a magical feat of storytelling told by a narrator who is looking back on a fully lived life.
Mr. Davies provides his own review of his novel with the last paragraphs of the book:

"The telephone rings. My intuition suggests a wrong number. Not that great intuition is needed; a nearby new cinema has been granted a number that is only one digit away from mine, and wrong numbers are common. This
...more
Michele
Apr 21, 2014 rated it really liked it
"A monstrosity of pomposity," "a vainglorious volume of verbiage," "a niggling novel of nugacity." If I were a character in this book, that would be my assessment. Yes, this book is chock-full of great words, but perhaps a lesson from E.B. White is called for here: "Don't be tempted by a twenty-dollar word when a ten-center is handy." While I love a book that requires me to read with a dictionary, this one had me several times saying "The Heck You Mean?" For example, the word "Laodicean"....had ...more
Mary Ronan Drew
Nov 15, 2011 rated it really liked it
"Should I have taken the false teeth?"

Not a bad opening sentence for a novel in which all the action is precipitated by the death at the altar on Good Friday of a beloved priest in Toronto's high church Anglican parish of St Aidan's. The narrator, the cunning man of the title, Dr Hullah, has been a police surgeon and he has his suspicions about the sudden death of the old man. But his friend from childhood, Father Charlie Iredale, won't let him beyond the communion rail and the doctor does noth
...more
Sheri-lee
Aug 24, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I think I 'really liked' this book more at the beginning. The last quarter is more in the 'like' category. But Davies is still an interesting and engaging read. In discussion with a fellow Davies-enjoyer, the idea of why people enjoy him so much was discussed. It was argued that his writing was always a reflection of something he enjoyed himself; books written for the love of the process and the ideas within them which is transparent to the reader and is what makes his books so enjoyable. We do ...more
verbava
"the cunning man" – роман-нотатки, роман-підсумок, записаний титульним персонажем не те щоб зовсім наприкінці життя, але на тому його етапі, коли позаду залишилося значно більше часу й подій, аніж чекає попереду. тон цих нотаток спокійний, іноді навіть смиренний, бо їхній автор уже добре знає невідворотність утрат, неминучість розбитих ілюзій і неспроможність добратися до суті всіх речей. утім, у суть речей він, лікар-парацельсіанець, переконаний у тому, що тіло й душа нерозривно пов'язані, тож ...more
Justin Morgan
Nov 16, 2012 rated it liked it
This was my first foray into Robertson Davies, and I chose his final book to begin with. From the first few pages I was hooked, a mysterious death at the altar rail of an eccentric high church Anglican priest witnessed by a motley ensemble of characters the reader gets to know over the next 470 pages. What's not to love? However, the book loses steam half way through albeit not in an unreadable way. There are lots of amazing observations and highly quotable turns of phrase, but there is also a b ...more
Bob
Oct 15, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literary-fiction
The "Cunning Man" is the narrator of this novel, physician Jon Hullah. The title comes from the idea of every village having either a Wise Woman or a Cunning Man--someone with insights into the nature of things who sometimes brings healing or at least perspective.

The book spans the seventy years of Hullah's life from his own encounter with a Wise Woman following his miraculous recovery from scarlet feaver to the autumn of his life as a medical practitioner caring for his long-time friend Charlie
...more
Doreen
Jun 05, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Robertson Davies is one of my favorite authors because he writes intelligent, kind novels that navigate the weird and wonderful world of human life with a precision that is often sharp but never cruel. The Cunning Man continues in this tradition, and for 400 pages does a wonderful job of melding the grounded with the fantastic. And the language! Mr Davies almost haphazardly throws in elegant phrases that lesser writers would labor towards, setting them in places of pride among the many duller wo ...more
Lisette
I started this book for my book club, which members had highly recommended it, knowing that it was a mystery. In the very beginning there is a death and hints that it will be investigated but this is never addressed again until the very end of the book. The middle of the book is a look back at the lives of the main character and some of its friends.

While the book was enjoyable it is a very slow reading book. I believe it was written int the late 40's early 50's and the writing style reflects th
...more
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William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (died in Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. He was one of Canada's best-known and most popular authors, and one of its most distinguished "men of letters", a term Davies is sometimes said to have detested. Davies was the founding Master of Massey College, a graduate college at the University of Toro ...more
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Other Books in the Series

Toronto Trilogy (2 books)
  • Murther and Walking Spirits (Toronto Trilogy, #1)
“I had become wiser, I tried to find out what irony really is, and discovered that some ancient writer on poetry had spoken of “Ironia, which we call the drye mock.” And I cannot think of a better term for it: The drye mock. Not sarcasm, which is like vinegar, or cynicism, which is so often the voice of disappointed idealism, but a delicate casting of cool and illuminating light on life, and thus an enlargement. The ironist is not bitter, he does not seek to undercut everything that seems worthy or serious, he scorns the cheap scoring-off of the wisecracker. He stands, so to speak, somewhat at one side, observes and speaks with a moderation which is occasionally embellished with a flash of controlled exaggeration. He speaks from a certain depth, and thus he is not of the same nature as the wit, who so often speaks from the tongue and no deeper. The wit’s desire is to be funny; the ironist is only funny as a secondary achievement.” 8 likes
“she swore in good mouth-filling oaths, but never smutty ones, and that was uncommon. She knew the prosody of profanity. . . . she knew the tune, as well as the words. She was not a raving beauty, but she had fine eyes and a Pre-Raphelite air of being too good for this world while at the same time exhibiting much of what this world desires in a woman, and I suppose I gaped at her and behaved clownishly.” 4 likes
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