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Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors
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Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors

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4.34  ·  Rating details ·  1,325 ratings  ·  348 reviews
Magnificently capturing the colorful world of Islam for the youngest readers, this breathtaking and informative picture book celebrates Islam's beauty and traditions. From a red prayer rug to a blue hijab, everyday colors are given special meaning as young readers learn about clothing, food, and other important elements of Islamic culture, with a young Muslim girl as a gui ...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published June 6th 2012 by Chronicle Books
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Average rating 4.34  · 
Rating details
 ·  1,325 ratings  ·  348 reviews


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Cora
May 30, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Beautiful! One of my students bought this at our Book fair and I read it to the class. Lovely illustrations, a message of acceptance and diversity, and poetic.
CW (The Quiet Pond) ✨
Such a lovely picture book about shapes and colours that intertwines with the beauty of Islamic culture and traditions. Beautifully illustrated as well and such heartfelt and loving words.

Perfect for younger readers, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, that shows shines a light on the everyday beauty of Islam!
Bina
Jun 09, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: ramadanreadathon
Wonderful picture book with GORGEOUS Illustrations!
Abigail
Nov 17, 2019 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Readers Looking for Children's Picture-Books Featuring Muslim Content
Pakistani-American author Hena Khan, whose The Night of the Moon was a lovely picture-book tribute to the Muslim month of Ramadan, teams up here with Iranian illustrator Mehrdokht Amini to produce a celebration of the role of Islam in a young girl's life. The result is a distinct triumph! With a rhyming text suitable for younger children - "Red is the rug / Dad kneels on to pray, / facing toward Mecca, / five times a day" - and gorgeous artwork that will grab kids' attention and keep it, Gol ...more
Debbie
Oct 27, 2020 rated it it was amazing
A beautifully written and gorgeously illustrated book introducing young children to various colorful objects associated with Islam. This book also includes a glossary for unfamiliar words.
An enjoyable read-aloud for children in Grades 1 to 4. I highly recommend this book to my Alberta Grade 3 teacher colleagues when introducing Tunisian culture in the social studies curriculum. Please see my review of another suitable book, also written by Hena Khan, regarding Muslim culture called UNDER MY HIJ
...more
Cathy
Aug 10, 2015 rated it really liked it
I found this because my friend Sarah reviewed it. I have dear friends who are Muslims and I'm always looking for ways to understand their culture, so I reserved it from the library to see if it might be a good book for their three year-old. The book is quite lovely, the pictures have a lot of details and shapes and colors that make them really feel like they celebrate Muslim culture and family life. The simple text, so similar to other color books (Blue is the hijab Mom likes to wear, It's a sca ...more
Sandy Brehl
In and of itself, this is a gorgeous concept book, using fluent and simple rhymed text to feature both color names and Muslim vocabulary. It's far too easy to see this as a charming offering for Muslim children, but it deserves a much wider audience. Children around the world so often have books focused on their own culture but ALSO have experiences with books in other languages and from other cultures. Sadly, in the US we so often direct readers only to titles from their specific culture, excep ...more
La Coccinelle
May 11, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children
I read Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets: A Muslim Book of Shapes a couple of years ago, and quite liked it. Our library just got Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors, even though it came out years earlier. I'm glad I got a chance to have a look at it, because it's just as strong as its companion.

The illustrations are lovely and clear and really help set off the text. I also like that there's a glossary at the back that offers a little more explanation of the terms use
...more
Jim Erekson
Apr 14, 2013 rated it liked it
Interesting genre issues here. The book is clearly intended to present an insider's definitions of Muslim concepts. The device of presenting each fact through a color has the feel of a nursery rhyme, but not any one in specific. Khan's sense of rhythm is convincing this way. Amini's illustrations are unique in style with a textured background for each image, and an airbrushed look as well as hints of collaged cloth and photography. But I think this is all computer drawn. I can't say exactly why, ...more
Nisha
May 18, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I am nearly as much of a novice toward Islam as my 2-year old son. This is the ideal first book to introduce both of us to the Islamic culture. Upon opening the first pages, I was stunned to see such beautiful and colorful artwork - it makes sense, since at it's bare bones, this is a color primer. Each color is delightfully displayed and introduces an aspect of Islamic way of life - orange is the mehandi ... and brown is the dates. The lyrical quality of the text was easy to follow and simple en ...more
Chinook
May 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: kids
I think I'll buy a paper copy of this for Kait. It's a lovely introduction to Islam and the illustrations are gorgeous.

June 16: We borrowed this from the library again. Maddie loved that the girl looks like Rapunzel with her long hair and the illustration of her standing on a balcony. Kait was fascinated by the henna.
حسناء
Jan 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
it's so beautiful , i was happy reading it
Fatima
Sep 26, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: text-set-muslim
This is a very simple informational book that can be used to introduce children to Islam and to teach them about the culture as well as vocabulary used by the Muslim community. The author is teaching colors and linking them to objects that are common in the Muslim community. It mentions key words and places such as Mecca, hijab, mosque, Ramadan, kufi and Allah. In a very simplistic way the author and illustrator use colors to inform the reader of what the life of a Muslim family could look like. ...more
Amanda Nye

1.) Text-to-World: There are many families in the community that are Muslim and wear traditional hijabs. Many times, students question this dress because it is different, so this is a great way to introduce this custom to students.

2.) This book exposes children to a variety of characteristics of the Muslim faith/culture. The book addresses the different important traditions and components that are unique to the Muslim community. Through the use of colors, the author is able to introduce differe
...more
Yasmeen
Oct 26, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Grade/Interest level: Primary
Reading level: n/a
Genre: Multicultural, Picture book
Main Characters: young Muslim girl and her family
Setting: n/a
POV: young Muslim girl
This book is a Muslim book of colors that is told in a simple melodic rhyme. It is told through the eyes of a young Muslim girl who tells the reader about her religion, Islam. She talks about all the traditions that many readers may not know much about. The illustrations supplement the story really well. They are all influenced by I
...more
Elizabeth
Amina's Voice was my first experience reading Hena Khan, and after falling in love with it I knew I'd want to read more from her. I am so glad that I did!

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns is filled with some lovely simple rhymes that make for easy reading, really great colour imagery, great representation for Muslim kids, and a beautiful introduction to the culture for non-Muslim kids. The illustrations are especially beautiful as well, and I look forward to seeing more from the illustrator.

Thi
...more
Stephanie Metcalf
Nov 25, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: wow-books
The title, Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns paints a picture all by itself of a beautiful far away land. In this informational text a young Muslim girl shares her way of life or deen. A book about colors that shows another cultures way of life, I believe that this book is an excellent addition to any library. "Silver is a fanoos, a twinkling light, a shiny lantern that glows at night."

This is a WOW book for me because in a time when our country is so divided, we should be embracing each other a
...more
Tasha
Dec 06, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
This color concept book introduces young readers to Islam and the many gorgeous colors of that religion and culture. So when the red of the prayer rug is talked about, so is praying five times a day. There is the blue of her mother’s hijab, used to cover her hair. Orange is the color of henna. Yellow is the box for Eid gifts for those in need. Green is the color of the Quran. In each instance and others, the culture is woven into the colors in a beautiful and effortless way. This is a look at Is ...more
Jessica
Aug 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
With all the talk recently about windows and mirrors in children's literature, I love is book for encouraging my Muslim students to share about their culture and for helping my non-Muslim students understand some of the beautiful traditions and practices detailed in this book. Even though it says it's a book of colors, it's so much more than that. The illustrations are absolutely stunning and beautifully detailed, and my students poured over them for days after we read and discussed this book to ...more
Leo
Oct 01, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: juvenile
This is by far my absolute favorite!
It is very rare that you come across diverse books especially depicting a cultural setting. I have to say that the illustrator is truly talented. I love the vivid display of colors used to describe things that make up your entire world. This is definitely one to share with young ones as they embark on their journey of understanding how to identify using colors and expressions.
Love it! :)
Laura
Jun 01, 2014 rated it liked it
Shelves: mc-arab-muslim
A very simple book about colors that uses elements of Islam to represent each color. It is appropriate for k-1 and can be used with students of any culture, but in particular it is nice that children of Islam can see themselves in represented accurately and positively in literature. The illustrations are gorgeous! The book also includes a glossary to inform more about the Islamic elements.
Carla Salinas
Sep 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing
An informative story about the Muslim culture. It won a notable children’s book award. I would recommend this book because it teaches children about a culture that may be different than their own. Personally, I learned a lot about the Muslim culture by reading this short story. The pictures are also very vibrant and detailed that I’m sure it would catch the student’s eyes.
Jillian Heise
A color book about much more. Items important in the authors' Muslim faith are described on the pages with beautiful illustrations, and defined in a glossary at the back. A lovely book that should be included in all elementary school libraries.
Donalyn
A beautifully illustrated color concept book that introduces key elements of the Muslim faith. The author and illustrator drew on their heritage to create an accurate and affirming book.
Debrarian
A gorgeous book of colors, each showcased in a two-page spread with a simple poem about some aspect of Islam ("Orange is the color of my henna designs. They cover my hands in leafy vines.")
Ms. B
Oct 28, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2013, nonfiction
Color and rhymes about Islamic traditions. A simple and beautiful story to introduce young readers.
Kara
Aug 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing

A beautiful little book about the simple ideas of enjoying all the beauty around you and loving your family.
حياة الياقوت
Apr 06, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Mesmerising! I loved the simple yet meaningful concept. The illustrations are just super. The title could have been shorter and more appealing though.
Taneka
Apr 25, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Very beautiful. The artwork is amazing. It provides a basic understanding of Islam from the mouth of a small child.
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Hena Khan is the award-winning author of the middle grade novels AMINA’S VOICE, MORE TO THE STORY, and the ZAYD SALEEM: CHASING THE DREAM series, and picture books GOLDEN DOMES AND SILVER LANTERNS, CRESCENT MOONS AND POINTED MINARETS, NIGHT OF THE MOON, and UNDER MY HIJAB. She wrote IT'S RAMADAN, CURIOUS GEORGE and the WORST CASE SCENARIO ULTIMATE ADVENTURE MARS and AMAZON books.

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