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Feminist Disability Studies

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4.2  ·  Rating details ·  49 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
Disability, like questions of race, gender, and class, is one of the most provocative topics among theorists and philosophers today. This volume, situated at the intersection of feminist theory and disability studies, addresses questions about the nature of embodiment, the meaning of disability, the impact of public policy on those who have been labeled disabled, and how w ...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published October 1st 2011 by Indiana University Press
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Mentai
This volume shows how disability -- a contested word, just as 'women' is -- may be engaged with critically. For me the most valuable essays are the ones that point out there are no easy methods to analysing disability. For example, to simply exchange 'disability' for 'gender' in Butler's work on performativity, although a good idea in theory, does not necessarily work in practice. (Please excuse me, I'm writing this from memory and it's been some time, I will come back with the author). The othe ...more
Kate Savage
Mar 24, 2016 rated it really liked it
I'm kind of giddy about this book. Reading it, I felt inspired and I felt challenged, and it's been a while since theory really got at me like that. Feminist disability theory is lively and bold and hasn't been considered enough. People who think should read this.

One essay by Susannah B. Mintz discusses Georgina Kleege's memoir Sight Unseen, which analyzes blindness and sightedness. It sorts through the "touchingly naive" notions of sighted people, and prioritizes an epistemology of blindness (r
...more
Laurel L. Perez
Jan 06, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This collection is a game changer, it was incredibly enlightening on issues I have not heard and certainly not yet read enough about. This volume shows how disability a contested word, just as 'woman' is, may be engaged with critically. The most valuable essays are the ones that point out there are no easy methods to analyzing disability. I feel like I have a lot to think about, and more to critically engage with from here on out.
Sarah
Sep 17, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Five stars just because it exists. Ha. Screw able-bodied feminism.
Anna
Jul 11, 2012 rated it really liked it
My full review of this book can be found at Global Comment: http://globalcomment.com/review-femin...
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