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The Aeneid

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3.81  ·  Rating details ·  89,358 Ratings  ·  1,960 Reviews
The Aeneid (play /əˈniːɪd/; Latin: Aeneis [ajˈneːis]—the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil from 29 to 19 BCE, that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. It is composed of roughly 10,000 lines in dactylic hexameter. The first six of the poem's tw ...more
Paperback, 442 pages
Published June 16th 1990 by Vintage (first published -19)
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Don Dido suffers more because Aeneas is demonstrating the Roman virtue of severitas, which is a fulfillment in its own right.
Cassandra Not very often. He's mostly just a 2D character whose actions are only chosen because they are the most pietas. Virgil rarely shows Aeneas' actual…moreNot very often. He's mostly just a 2D character whose actions are only chosen because they are the most pietas. Virgil rarely shows Aeneas' actual thoughts and feelings - basically the only thing Aeneas does for himself is to be with Dido, and even then you barely get to see what Aeneas thinks about the whole thing.
One moment when he shows human feeling: Book 1, giving a rousing speech to his men saying stuff like 'we have long been no strangers to affliction' despite that he was 'sick at heart, for the cares which he bore were heavy indeed'.(less)

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Lisa
Feb 21, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
“What god can help me tell so dread a story?
Who could describe that carnage in a song - “

Well, the answer of course is Virgil, a poet of the era of Augustus’ Rome. Why does he write it? Many literary critics have condemned the Aeneid for being state propaganda. Of course it is. Openly, proudly so! Many others have condemned it for connecting strongly to other epic poems of the Ancient world, most notably of course Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Of course it does. Openly, proudly so!

The Aeneid is a
...more
Meredith
I’m a huge fan of propaganda, but I think I may not be a fan of fan fic. I was going into this with the hope that it would be fun, extreme, Latin propaganda, but The Aeneid is really more Trojan War fan fic, IMO. It’s the Phantom Menace to The Iliad’s Empire Strikes Back. It is seriously lame. I think Akira Kurosawa could have made a pretty decent movie of it because he likes to have people frenzy. There’s a lot of frenzying here. The dudes are all chest pound, blooooood, and the chicks are all ...more
Foad
انه ايد و مختارنامه!

مختارنامه رو ديديد؟ ديديد چقدر جنگ هاش تصنعیه؟ پر از حركات خشك و نمايشى، انگار نه انگار كه اون جا جنگه و دو نفر دارن با خشم و وحشت به قصد كشت تيغ تيز روانه ى سينه و گلوى هم مى كنن. نه وحشتى، نه عرقى، نه به نفس نفس افتادنى، نه تيرى كه توى گوشت گير مى كنه و بيرون نمياد، نه لخته خون كف كرده ى جارى از گلويى...

فكر مى كنم بخشى اين ها به خاطر اينه كه عوامل اثر نه خودشون در جنگى حضور داشتن تا واقعيتش رو ببينن (طبيعتاً) و نه تخيل قدرتمندى داشتن كه بتونن جنون آشوبناك يه جنگ رو پيش خودش
...more
James
Book Review
3 out of 5 stars to The Aeneid, a classic work written in 17 BC by Virgil.

In The Aeneid, Virgil creates two vastly different archetypal heroes named Turnus and Aeneas. Aeneas is a Trojan prince who has hopes of finding a new Troy in the land of Latium, but he runs into an angered Turnus, a Rutulian prince that does not welcome Aeneas. Both men are equally strong, equally determined, and have equal and rightful claim to the land. However, Virgil creates this distinct difference a
...more
Libby
Jun 16, 2008 rated it liked it
Recommends it for: Classics scholars, folks who want bragging rights
There are plenty of reviews here telling you why you should or shouldn't read book X. This review of Virgil's "Aeneid," the largely-completed first century BC nationalist epic poem that recounts the Trojan War and Aeneas's role in the eventual founding of Rome, will tell you instead why you should read a copy of "Aeneid" from a university library. Simply put: student annotations.

Nearly every book in a university catalog has been checked out at one time or another by a student reading it as prim
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
منظومهای حماسی در دوازده جلد، که «ویرژیل» شاعر روم باستان آن را در پایان سدهٔ نخست پیش از میلاد و به زبان لاتین سروده، «ویرژیل» راهنمای سفر دانته در دوزخ و برزخ کمدی الهی نیز هست. سرودهای شبانی، و سرودهای روستایی را نیز ایشان سروده است
Eneide, Virgil
عنوان: انه اید؛ اثر: ویرژیل؛ برگردان: میرجلال الدین کزازی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز، 1381، در 479 ص، شابکها: 9643057151؛ 9643051099؛ 9789643057152؛ چاپ دوم 1375، چاپ سوم 1383، چاپ ششم 1387؛ واژه نامه دارد، نمایه دارد؛ موضوع: شعر حماسی لاتینی ترجمه
...more
Elise (TheBookishActress)
some funny reviews as to my opinions on this

1) this is filled with purple prose and instalove, complete with a hot sexy bad boy for the main character

2) hello my name is Aeneas Dark'ness Dementia Raven Way. I have long ebony black hair and some people say I look like Aphrodite (AN: if u don’t know who she is get da hell out of here!) I was sailing through the ever-mindful anger of the savage Juno. It was raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of gods stared at me. I put
...more
Edward
Feb 11, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Introduction
Map


--The Aeneid

Translator's Postscript
Genealogy: The Royal Houses of Greece and Troy
Suggestions for Further Reading
Variants from the Oxford Classical Text
Notes on the Translation
Pronouncing Glossary
Trevor
Mar 09, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literature
I’ve been meaning to read the Aeneid for years. The Armorial Bearings of the City of Melbourne have the motto: Vires Acquirit Eundo which is taken from book four of the Aeneid. It translates as, “It gathers strength as it goes”. Melbourne’s first judge gave the young town the motto – but I’ve often wondered if those he gave it to had any idea that the reference is to sexual rumours spreading about Dido and Aeneas. Rumour being the swiftest of the Gods.

Anyway, there is a pop star who is called Di
...more
Robert
Mar 21, 2010 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Oh, Aeneid, it isn't you... it's me!

I tried to like you, Aeneid, I really did. And we had some good times, didn't we? But I have to admit that I think I was still a bit hung up on Iliad, and I was trying to make you something you aren't. That isn't fair to you, and it isn't fair to me.

You've got such nice language in you. Such poetry! I'm sure that someone will come along soon who can appreciate you for what you are. You deserve it. Really. You're a wonderful story; you're just not for me.

I fina
...more
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Goodreads Librari...: Merge and add info 4 15 Jun 20, 2017 08:57AM  
The Roman History...: SEPTEMBER 2016 - The Aeneid 4 15 Oct 10, 2016 10:31AM  
You'll love this ...: August 2015 - The Aeneid 48 37 Aug 27, 2015 06:47PM  
Ancient and Medie...: The Aeneid 1 10 Jan 17, 2015 10:38AM  
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Oresteia  (Ορέστεια, #1-3)
  • The Sixteen Satires
  • The Odes of Horace
  • Metamorphoses
  • The Satyricon
  • The Way Things Are: The De Rerum Natura
  • The Golden Ass
  • Pharsalia: The Civil War
  • The Early History of Rome (The History of Rome, #1-5)
  • Euripides V: Electra / The Phoenician Women / The Bacchae
  • Theogony/Works and Days
  • The Portable Dante
  • The Annals of Imperial Rome
  • Poems and Fragments
  • Frogs and Other Plays
919
Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BCE – September 21, 19 BCE), usually called Virgil or Vergil /ˈvɜrdʒəl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues (or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.

Virgil is trad
...more
More about Virgil...
Fléctere si néqueo súperos Acheronta movebo - If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell.” 427 likes
“The descent into Hell is easy” 176 likes
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