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How Phenomena Appear to Unfold
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How Phenomena Appear to Unfold

4.39  ·  Rating details ·  31 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews

Literary Nonfiction. New & Expanded Edition. "In 'Eco-logic in Writing,' one of many brilliant essay-talks in this volume, Leslie Scalapino asks, 'Seeing the the moment of, or at the time of, writing, what difference does one's living make?' What more crucial question for those concered not only with writing but with poethics: composing words into a socially conscious
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Paperback, 119 pages
Published December 1st 1989 by Sun & Moon Pr
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Rodney
Jun 16, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
Leslie Scalapino was maybe never clearer about her own poetic practice than when writing about others’, and the responses here to poets from Beckett to Berssenbrugge, McClure to Murasaki, Silliman to Stein—and most especially, for me, the various engagements with Robert Duncan and Philip Whalen—give a hugely helpful context for entering into her own poems, fictions, and plays, which are skillfully worked into the weave of this expanded version of her 1989 collection of the same name.

Ever since
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Camille Martin
Dec 22, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: poetry-read
The following is an essay about the work of Leslie Scalapino, in which I discuss this and other books of hers:
Reading the Minds of Events: Leslie Scalapino’s Plural Time
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Leslie Scalapino (July 25, 1944 – May 28, 2010) was a United States poet, experimental prose writer, playwright, essayist, and editor, sometimes grouped in with the Language poets, though she felt closely tied to the Beat poets. A longtime resident of California's Bay Area, she earned an M.A. in English from the University of California at Berkeley. One of Scalapino's most critically well-received ...more
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