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The Urban Birder

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3.8  ·  Rating details ·  79 Ratings  ·  9 Reviews
Birding is cool and anyone can do it, even in the heart of the city. That's the message of David Lindo, a.k.a. the Urban Birder. Whether the reader is at home, in the park, traveling to work, or just looking out a window, the opportunities are always there. This inspirational guide to birding in our cities recounts Lindo's personal journey of discovery, and includes entert ...more
Hardcover, 224 pages
Published July 3rd 2012 by New Holland (first published August 1st 2011)
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Clare O'Beara
Aug 19, 2014 rated it it was amazing
While I had not heard of the Urban Birder before linking with him on a social site, the title stuck easily so as soon as I saw this book I picked it up to buy.

London where David Lindo grew up is a vast sprawl of city and among its gardens, parks, reservoirs, derelict sites and wild spaces, innumerable bird species are to be found. Some are resident for all or part of the year while many other species migrate across Britain and use London as part of the route. Any keen bird watcher may see somet
...more
Rachel
Dec 07, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: natural-history
An entertaining read, his relaxed and chatty writing style means it is easy to get through in a weekend. I read this following a talk by the author at one of the Kent Ornithological Society meetings. His overriding message is that you don't have to make a pilgrimage to the countryside to find good birds, they are on your doorstep if you just take the time to look. In fact, as was alluded to at the KOS meeting, with current farming practices being so hostile to birds and other wildlife it is not ...more
Joanna
Aug 04, 2014 rated it did not like it
Shelves: ornithology
Redundant and extremely boring. I thought memoirs/autobiographies were supposed to be written for a purpose? This is merely a monument to himself by himself - and, I suppose, for himself. EVEN if his sole purpose in writing this was to give a solid depiction of his life (which, he stated, as the "urban birder," was not his purpose), his life is not interesting enough or inspiring enough to so much as stir a small feeling in the reader. Throughout the book, he seems bent on convincing you that "o ...more
Gabrielle
A light little autobio about David Lindo, the "Urban Birder." Knowing next to nothing about birds, unfortunately, a lot of the technical terms and names were lost on me. Recommended for someone who is at least a little knowledgeable on birding. Sadly, I also had to skim the last bit of the book as I think I just had it sitting by bedside for so long half-finished that I lost momentum with it. Humorous and informative, I would check out other books by Lindo.
Katie Baker
Aug 21, 2018 rated it really liked it
I love to read about someone who has a true passion for something - it is inspiring - and David Lindo is truly passionate and inspiring. It did prompt me to look up although I think I need a few more field guides before I start to see what David Lindo sees.
Jennifer
May 24, 2016 rated it liked it
This wasn't quite what I anticipated. It's about the Urban Birder singular rather than generic - a man with whom I have limited familiarity as I don't watch a lot of TV or read a lot of magazines. But I applaud his endeavour. Yes, it is clever self-marketing and whilst his career history shows where he might have acquired this talent, it seems entirely legitimate and a likely force for good - black and city dwelling, he's a fine poster boy to encourage people to connect with nature where they ar ...more
Sarah Scribbler
Jan 01, 2016 rated it really liked it
My final choice in my books of 2015. Took it as a random selection on holiday to France and found myself converted as an urban birder abroad. The result was we were looking up at the cliffs more than out to sea... Couldn't wait to get home in the evening and find out more about David's bird spotting adventures. When's the sequel coming?
Stephen Nickless
I saw David Lindo on the TV. He is an enthusiast who is relaxed and engaging an communicates well. This book is more autobiography than bird guide but is of local interest to me as I live a short distance from his favourite sites - the Brent reservoir at Welsh Harp and to Wormwood Scrubs. See his web page with wonderful pictures and videos at www.theurbanbirder.com
Alan Mcmahon
Jan 06, 2013 rated it it was amazing
A brilliant read.... Not only do you find out about David and his message for us all to get into the world of 'urban birding' you also get the added bonus of Cornelius Ravenwing the Third ...... Great stuff! Where are my bins?
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