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As Long as the Rivers Flow
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As Long as the Rivers Flow

3.98  ·  Rating details ·  85 ratings  ·  12 reviews
Winner of the Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction


In the 1800s, the education of First Nations children was taken on by various churches, in government-sponsored residential schools. Children were forcibly taken from their families in order to erase their traditional languages and cultures.


As Long as the Rivers Flow is the story of Larry Loyie's last summe
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Paperback, 48 pages
Published September 4th 2005 by Groundwood Books (first published February 2003)
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3.98  · 
Rating details
 ·  85 ratings  ·  12 reviews


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Jeffrey
Aug 22, 2012 rated it it was amazing
This is just a stunning picture book both in terms of the story and illustrations as Larry Loyie documents the last summer he and his family spent at their summer camp before Larry and his siblings were taken to residential school

Jan/14 Each time I read this, I find new wonders in it - Loyie is such a nuanced and gentle chronicler of his childhood - and as always, when the soft green and brown watercolours are suddenly replaced by the stark black and white photos of Larry and his siblings at the
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Gina
Nov 13, 2018 rated it really liked it
Short chapter book dealing with an indigenous boy's life leading up to the time he is taken away to residential school.

As the book ends with him being loaded into the truck and his family's helplessness to keep him, it is a harsh ending, though foreshadowing shouldn't make it feel too out of place. Photos and an epilogue tell a little bit more about author Larry Loyie and his life.

The book works primarily to create the sense of loss over what young Larry was losing. While he did make it back to
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Dawn
May 10, 2016 rated it really liked it
Shelves: canadian-history
Worldview: Universally Acceptable

Age
Read Aloud - 8 yrs +
Independent Reader - 10 yrs +

Setting:
Location - Slave Lake, Alberta
Time Period - 1940s

Review:
This is a very simple, bittersweet picture book. The lovely nostalgic artwork brings to life the story of the author’s last summer before he and his siblings were taken to a residential school. He has done a wonderful job of conveying the aboriginal culture, while giving a strong feeling of long summer days full of adventure that any child can rel
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Margaret
Oct 07, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: native_american
Debbie Reese’s Blog Recommended for Middle School
This book is about the last summer of a family before they had to give up their children to send them to a residential school. The parents had no choice and could be jailed for failing to send their children. This practice happened in both Canada and the US from around the 1880’s for about one hundred years.

Lawrence, his sister, and brother spend a great summer with his family. First, they rescue an abandoned owl and learn to take care of it. He
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MargaretKim
Dec 19, 2018 rated it really liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Brianna Wolki
Nov 07, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: all ages
Recommended to Brianna by: her Northern Studies teachers
Shelves: east-three-10
Name: East Three 10
Title: My Review

The title offers an important perspective about the situation. I really liked this book because it displays beautiful illustrations, it's also a overwhelming book. I can understand at an emotional view of what it would be like to leave home for Residential school. Larry Loyie shares a personal but great story of his last summer before he and his siblings were taken away from their family. Most of the story focuses on what was otherwise a normal seasonal routine
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Tiffany
Feb 13, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: teaching, fnmi
The illustrations and narrative really bring the story to life. It's more than just a story, though, because interwoven are the traditions that Lawrence learned as a boy, such as flipping the berries over so they would dry faster, and thanking the grizzly for giving up its spirit. I think this would be another great addition to a classroom collection. This is Lawrence just appreciating life as it should be. The ending detailing the residential school experience is a fairly generic description, I ...more
Janice Forman
This book is in a recommended reading list for Aboriginal Resources for young people. I decided that I would read all the books in the list -- for my own interest and simply to take a look at the reading information available to young readers.

"As Long as the Rivers Flow" is an account of the author's last summer before he and his siblings were taken away to residential school. It was 1944 and Larry Loyie is ten, on the brink of learning from his extended family how to survive and live off the la
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MKK
Sep 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
A powerful story with wonderful illustrations about a family and their children at their summer camp before going away to Indian Residential School. As an Anishnaabe I would recommend this book to all readers as an act of reconciliation. Hear the stories. Build connection in the poignant retelling of this brutal time in Canada’s history.
Audrey
Oct 31, 2011 rated it it was amazing
This was a beautiful story about a First Nations boy before he was sent to a government residential school. He writes about his last summer at home. He had a pet owl and observed his grandmother shoot a grizzly with a twenty-two. A lovely book.
Trina Crawford
Aug 03, 2016 rated it it was amazing
A vivid picture book/story of a young man's last summer before being taken to a residential school. An excellent resource for classrooms in teaching Treaty Education and supporting Truth and Reconciliation lessons.
Marci Laevens
Feb 21, 2019 rated it really liked it
An excellent illustration of the closeness and culture that children were torn from when required to attend residential schools.
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