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The Wind Through the Keyhole (The Dark Tower, #8)
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The Wind Through the Keyhole (The Dark Tower #8)

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4.15  ·  Rating details ·  49,981 Ratings  ·  4,382 Reviews
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Stephen King returns to the rich landscape of Mid-World, the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.

Roland Deschain and his ka-tetJake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler—encounter a ferocious storm just after crossing the River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelter from the howling ga
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Kindle Edition, 322 pages
Published April 24th 2012 by Scribner (first published February 21st 2012)
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Eileen I read it after the core DT series, after a few months. I highly recommend the same as it provides a bit of nostalgia value. I think reading it…moreI read it after the core DT series, after a few months. I highly recommend the same as it provides a bit of nostalgia value. I think reading it between books 4 and 5 will chop up the story a bit too much -- a lot of action happens during that time and you don't want to get derailed.(less)
Nick Lugo My suggestion is absolutely stick with the original order and then read this between Wizard and Glass and Wolves of the Calla. It starts up just after…moreMy suggestion is absolutely stick with the original order and then read this between Wizard and Glass and Wolves of the Calla. It starts up just after Glass and ruins parts of both The Waste Land and Wizard and Glass (major enough parts that i would avoid this at all costs)

My suggestion for my friends has been read 1-4, then Wind, then 5-7, then read the graphic novels and the short story Little Sisters of Eluria. You could read the first few Graphic Novels after Wizard and before Calla, because the first (5 I think) couple are really all about Roland's past.

Also, if you wanna get crazy with it, you should read Insomnia, Salem's Lot, The Stand, The Talisman, Black House, Eye of the Dragon, Hearts in Atlantis, Rose Madder, and From a Buick 8- all of which have some bearing on the quest for the tower.(less)

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Mark Lawrence
Apr 06, 2012 rated it it was amazing
The headline here is that I almost never read a book in 3 days - but I did this one and I was up past my bedtime turning pages.

Stephen King has written this series across the whole span of his adult life & both the character and quality of the series change across the decades (and also between front and back cover). For me Dark Tower as a whole is often spectacular, sometimes a bit weak, but mostly very good.

The Wind Through The Keyhole (TWTTK) is set just after my favourite of the series '
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Kemper
May 01, 2012 rated it did not like it
Shenanigans! I cry shenanigans on Stephen King!

King put me through years of mental torture with The Dark Tower series, but I was able to forgive once he finally delivered a fitting ending to that saga. So I had a lot of concerns about him returning to the story of Roland. I worried that King had come down with a vicious case of Lucasitis that was going to have him tinkering with this story repeatedly.

However, King’s public statements indicated that it would not change the core Dark Tower story
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Delee
Prologue:

No one said that the path to the beam, on the way to the Dark Tower was going to be this hard... I was promised rainbows and unicorns, from my fearless leader- Stepheny.... She CAN be kind of a liaaaaaaaaaar- and she is sort of insaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaane- so I should have known this wasn't going to be easy.

...but sweet 8 pound 6 ounce baby Jesus- I had nooooooo forewarning that one of my beloved Ka-tet was going to fight tooth and nail..not to read 4.5. Getting everyone on board for this on
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Dan Schwent
Mar 11, 2011 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2012
While taking shelter from a storm along the Path of the Beam, Roland tells his ka-tet a story from his youth, about going up against a skin-man with Jamie DeCurry, in which he tells a frightened youth yet another story to bolster his courage...

First off, it pains me to give a Dark Tower book less than four stars but I thought this one was on par with Wizard and Glass.

The Wind Through the Keyhole is really three tales nested within one another. One features our beloved ka-tet, somewhere between t
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seak
Jan 12, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Dark Tower lovers and lovers of a well-written tale.
Shelves: 2012, stephen-king
Welcome to flashback town, population - Wizard and Glass and The Wind Through the Keyhole.



(It's a terrible ride btw, unless you enjoy your head getting bashed over and over again.)

Wizard and Glass may have the record for length of flashback, but Wind Through the Keyhole goes Inception* on that flashback with a flashback** within a flashback.

*It's still accepted to reference Inception right?

**Okay, really it's a story within a flashback, but the story is a flashback to an even younger Roland te
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Evgeny
Oct 20, 2015 rated it really liked it
Roland
Man with No Name
and his sidekicks (called ka-tet) were minding their own business and kept going towards the Dark Tower when suddenly they had to interrupt their journey in a hurry, find some shelter and stay put for several days. Roland tells a story from his younger days to kill time (Skin Man). In that story he in turn had to kill some time and recounted another - this time fictional - story named The Wind Through the Keyhole. Confused yet? I hope the following picture helps.
Russian nesting doll

So there is a story inside
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Jeff
This is the chilling prequel to my review of Wizard and Glass.

Inside the adobe the temperature dropped noticeably. If it weren’t for the fire in the hearth the ka-tet would have been shivering uncontrollably.

Outside the winds from the starkblast reverberated off the dwelling like the screams of a banshee in heat. The crack of exploding trees sounded like water balloons bursting against concrete.

The tall blonde turned to the strapping man, a Cheshire smile painted on her face, “You know, I have a
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Ɗắɳ  2.☊
★★★★☆

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.”

Whoops! Wrong quote there, but it seems somewhat appropriate for such a polarizing little book. I’m truly shocked at how varied the ratings are on this one, even amongst friends whose opinions I trust. I typically avoid all the .5 stories, since they’re usually just pointless filler, and seeing some of those one star ratings out there was not especially encouraging. Our fearless
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Andre Gonzalez
Mar 10, 2017 rated it liked it
The writing was stellar in this book, telling a story within a story has to be pretty difficult. While the story was entertaining, I'm having trouble seeing why it was necessary. I'm reading the DT series through for the first time and thought I would respect the order where this book fell, and feel like I could have done without this pitstop that takes away from the main journey. That being said, I look forward to starting Wolves of the Calla to get back on track!
Mark
Mar 22, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sci-fiction
The Wind Through the Keyhole so named after the book that Roland's mother used to read him as a child. Considered 4.5 in the dark Tower series, it is the closest of all to a stand alone novel.

Not written as tightly as the rest of the series, in some aspects, it is a mere afterthought to fill a void between chapters 4 and 5. Nearly the whole book is the story of Tim, another youngster from years gone by and his treacherous journey, not unlike Roland's story of his own teenage travels in the previ
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Stephen Edwin King was born the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King. After his father left them when Stephen was two, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mother. Parts of his childhood were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father's family was at the time, and in Stratford, Connecticut. When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, M ...more
More about Stephen King...

Other Books in the Series

The Dark Tower (8 books)
  • The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, #1)
  • The Drawing of the Three (The Dark Tower, #2)
  • The Waste Lands (The Dark Tower, #3)
  • Wizard and Glass (The Dark Tower, #4)
  • Wolves of the Calla (The Dark Tower, #5)
  • Song of Susannah (The Dark Tower, #6)
  • The Dark Tower (The Dark Tower, #7)
“What if I fall?', Tim cried.

Maerlyn laughed. 'Sooner or later, we all do.”
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“In the end, the wind takes everything, doesn't it? And why not? Why other? If the sweetness of our lives did not depart, there would be no sweetness at all.” 77 likes
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