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Il grande Gatsby
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Il grande Gatsby

3.9  ·  Rating details ·  2,935,839 Ratings  ·  53,649 Reviews
Nelle pagine di Fitzgerald come nella musica dell’Era del jazz e nel folk della Grande Depressione sentiamo un sottofondo di motori e clacson: ora quelli squillanti delle limousine, ora quelli gracchianti e tossicchianti dei macinini dell’emigrazione interna.” – Massimo Bocchiola
Paperback, BUR Grandi romanzi, 224 pages
Published July 13th 2011 by BUR Rizzoli (first published April 1925)
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Popular Answered Questions

Christine I do not think that 'transgender' is exactly the word you mean. I am pretty sure Nick identifies as a man, and he has not undergone any hormone…moreI do not think that 'transgender' is exactly the word you mean. I am pretty sure Nick identifies as a man, and he has not undergone any hormone treatments is 1922!! However -- I would say there is definite evidence that Nick has homo-erotic tendencies and most likely is in love with Gatsby.

I had read the novel twice and I never thought this before. But upon my 3rd read I discovered some passages that indicate Nick's homosexual tendencies. Namely -- Nick accompanies Mr. McKee home after a night of hard drinking and possibly ends up in his bed (p. 38). There are attractive women at the party, Nick has been paired off with Catherine, yet he leaves her and follows Mr. McKee, a total stranger, all the way home! In another incident, Nick is riding the train and he fantasizes about kissing the male conductor (p. 115). In another passage, Nick laments turning thirty and the fact that his list of 'single men' is dwindling (p. 135). These incidents are coupled with the fact that Nick repeatedly turns down offers from women, including Jordan Baker, girls from his home town and office romances. Nothing ever develops between Nick and any women, nor does he express desire for them. In such a beautifully written novel, Nick's attraction to any female would surely have been emphasized. But it is not. His infatuation for Gatsby is told many times and in great detail!

These clues are subtle, the kind of thing a reader might easily pass over. However, upon my 3rd read I must say the implications are definitely THERE.

It is a very layered and complicatetd novel. I believe Fitzgerald was attempting to encompass several sections of society. Why was he so vague? Remember, the novel was published in 1925, a time when people were jailed, beat up and killed for homosexuality.
(less)
Chrissa I don't think so. There is this scene in chapter 6, and they're in the hotel, (Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Jordan and Nick) and Tom says "... and next they'll…moreI don't think so. There is this scene in chapter 6, and they're in the hotel, (Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Jordan and Nick) and Tom says "... and next they'll throw everything overboard and have intermarriage between black and white."
Whereupon Jordan says: "We're all white here."(less)

Community Reviews

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Nataliya

Oh Gatsby, you old sport, you poor semi-delusionally hopeful dreamer with 'some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life', focusing your whole self and soul on that elusive money-colored green light - a dream that shatters just when you are *this* close to it.



Jay Gatsby, who dreamed a dream with the passion and courage few possess - and the tragedy was that it was a wrong dream colliding with reality that was even more wrong - and deadly.

Just like the Great Houdini - the association the
...more
Alex
Dec 24, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The Great Gatsby is your neighbor you're best friends with until you find out he's a drug dealer. It charms you with some of the most elegant English prose ever published, making it difficult to discuss the novel without the urge to stammer awestruck about its beauty. It would be evidence enough to argue that F. Scott Fitzgerald was superhuman, if it wasn't for the fact that we know he also wrote This Side of Paradise.

But despite its magic, the rhetoric is just that, and it is a cruel facade. Be
...more
Pollopicu
Sep 29, 2009 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
This is my least-favorite classic of all time. Probably even my least favorite book, ever.
I didn't have the faintest iota of interest in neither era nor lifestyle of the people in this novela. So why did I read it to begin with? well, because I wanted to give it a chance. I've been surprised by many books, many a times. Thought this could open a new literary door for me.
Most of the novel was incomprehensibly lame. I was never fully introduced to the root of the affair that existed between Gatsb
...more
svnh
Jul 31, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: one-more-time
After six years of these heated and polarized debates, I'm deleting the reviews that sparked them. Thanks for sharing your frustrations, joys, and insights with me, goodreaders. Happy reading!

In love and good faith, always,
Savannah
Kemper
Jay Gatsby, you poor doomed bastard. You were ahead of your time. If you would have pulled your scam after the invention of reality TV, you would have been a huge star on a show like The Bachelor and a dozen shameless Daisy-types would have thrown themselves at you.

Mass media and modern fame would have embraced the way you tried to push your way into a social circle you didn’t belong to in an effort to fulfill a fool’s dream as your entire existence became a lie and you desperately sought to re
...more
Gina
Oct 23, 2007 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
Over drinks, I’ve observed—like so many smart alecks—that much of The Great Gatsby’s popularity relies heavily on its shortness. At a sparse 180 pages, Fitzgerald’s masterpiece could be argued to be the “Great American novella.” Gatsby, like so many other short classics, is easily readable, re-readable, and assessable to everyone from the attention-deficient young to mothers juggling a kid, a career, and a long-held desire to catch up on all those books “they should have read but haven’t gotten ...more
emma
DAISY BUCHANAN IS A GIFT TO READERS EVERYWHERE AND THE HERO OF THE GREAT GATSBY, FOR SURE, NO QUESTIONS, FIGHT ME IN THE COMMENTS IF YOU THINK YOU’RE BOLD: A Thinkpiece by Me

https://emmareadstoomuch.wordpress.co...

I’ve known that Daisy effin’ rocks since I first read this book. (Fun fact: my first read of this took place in the back of the family minivan when I was 13, on a roadtrip to, like, Disney World or something. While thoughts of princesses and mouse-shaped ice cream bars danced in my sib
...more
Stephen
Photobucket

Casual, self-absorbed decadence, the evaporation of social grace, money calling all the shots and memories of the past holding people hostage from the future that lies before them. Yes, Mr. Fitzgerald has nailed it and written one of THE great American novels.

This book was a surprise. I LOVED it and all of the deep contradictions swimming around its heart. At once a scathing indictment on the erosion of the American Dream, but also a bittersweet love letter to the unfailing optimism of the Ame
...more
Inge
Oct 15, 2014 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: put-a-sock-in-it, meh
There was one thing I really liked about The Great Gatsby.

It was short.
LooseLips
Dec 31, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: the people who live in upstate egg.
Shelves: hmmm, re-reading
The eh Gatsby

Classic. Yes. THE great American novel. Hmph, so I heard. I suppose it should make one more interested, or at least feel more compelled to read something (or re-read as is the case here) when it has "classic" and "everyone else loves it!" stamped all over it. And has a movie made out of it, though what beloved novel hasn't these days? Of course, I originally read FSF's Gatsby because I was expected to for a high school English class. So, even though I was never the type to do homewo
...more
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Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was an American writer of novels and short stories, whose works have been seen as evocative of the Jazz Age, a term he himself allegedly coined. He is regarded as one of the greatest twentieth century writers. Fitzgerald was of the self-styled "Lost Generation," Americans born in the 1890s who came of age during World War I. He finished four novels, left a fifth unfini ...more
More about F. Scott Fitzgerald...
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” 10490 likes
“I hope she'll be a fool -- that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.” 9194 likes
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