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187 Reasons Mexicanos Can't Cross the Border: Undocuments, 1971-2007

3.96  ·  Rating details ·  93 Ratings  ·  11 Reviews

A hybrid collection of texts written and performed on the road, from Mexico City to San Francisco, from Central America to central California, illustrated throughout with photos and artwork. Rants, manifestos, newspaper cutups, street theater, anti-lectures, love poems, and riffs tell the story of what it’s like to live outlaw and brown in the United States.

Juan Felipe

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Paperback, 278 pages
Published November 1st 2007 by City Lights Publishers
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City Lights Author Juan Felipe Herrera Receives PEN West Poetry Award!

For his collection of verse spanning over three decades, 187 Reasons Mexicanos Can't Cross the Border, Juan Felipe Herrera has been awarded this year's PEN West award for outstanding poetry. City Lights congratulates the "wildly inventive" (New York Times) Juan Felipe!


Read the praise for 187 Reasonsin the New York Times Book Review!
"Herrera is . . . a sometimes hermetic, wildly inventive, always unpredictable poet, whose work
...more
Ben Trentelman
Apr 24, 2008 rated it liked it
Despite the fact that the Mexican population is growing greater in the U.S. every day, many people choose to remain ignorant of the history of our neighbors and friends from South of the border. After reading Herrera’s new book I felt like I had gained a great deal of insight about the experience of living in the U.S. as a Mexican. I also realized that I knew much less about Mexican culture than I would like to admit.
Herrera compiled over thirty years of “undocumets” consisting of poetry, journ
...more
Rafael Reynoso
A hybrid collection of texts written and performed on the road, from Mexico City to San Francisco, from Central America to central California, illustrated throughout with photos and artwork. Rants, manifestos, newspaper cutups, street theater, anti-lectures, love poems, and riffs tell the story of what it's like to live outlaw and brown in the United States.

PEN Center USA
Jun 09, 2011 rated it it was amazing
2009 PEN Center USA Poetry Award Winner
George
May 31, 2008 rated it it was amazing
This is Juan Felipe Herrera at his best.
Galindo
Dec 14, 2013 rated it really liked it
I have a new favorite poet and his name is Juan Felipe Herrera.
Liesel Hamilton
Sep 10, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Amazing. One of the most interesting collections of poetry I've ever read
Grace
Jul 22, 2015 marked it as hibernating-or-reading-sporadically
On page 55. Have to return it to the library. Will put it on hold again.
Amy
Jan 15, 2009 rated it it was amazing
unBELIEVABLE! The best thing I've come across in maybe 10 years, since I discovered Jo Carol Pierce. Better than Springsteen. It's not music, but it moves like music.
Rachel
Mar 25, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: justice-racism
I saw the author read the title piece in Arcata somewhere around 1995 (that's the year on my photocopied copy). Wonderful!
Carlos Cumpian
Jan 22, 2009 rated it really liked it
Herrera is a giant and just won't let Xicanos be invisible.
Dana Osburn
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Mar 19, 2017
Leonardo
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Aug 11, 2015
Megan Bodily
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Nov 23, 2015
Tony Gaxiola
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May 27, 2016
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Allison HedgeCoke
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Sep 05, 2007
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Juan Felipe Herrera is the only son of Lucha Quintana and Felipe Emilio Herrera; the three were campesinos living from crop to crop on the roads of the San Joaquín Valley, Southern California and the Salinas Valley. Herrera's experiences as the child of migrant farmers have strongly shaped his work, such as the children's book Calling the Doves, which won the Ezra Jack Keats award in 1997. He is a ...more
More about Juan Felipe Herrera...