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Understanding and Treating Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Relational Approach
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Understanding and Treating Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Relational Approach

4.29  ·  Rating details ·  31 ratings  ·  1 review
Building on the comprehensive theoretical model of dissociation elegantly developed in The Dissociative Mind, Elizabeth Howell makes another invaluable contribution to the clinical understanding of dissociative states with Understanding and Treating Dissociative Identity Disorder. Howell, working within the realm of relational psychoanalysis, explicates a multifaceted appr ...more
Paperback, 308 pages
Published April 23rd 2011 by Routledge (first published April 7th 2011)
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Susan
Aug 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This book is INVALUABLE for treating DID. It’s straightforward, well-organized, and easily the best resource I’ve found on DID. I can’t understand why it’s out of print. Used copies are available but expensive. However, if you’ve just started working with DID patients and are in need of guidance, it’s well worth the money.
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203 likes · 42 comments
“Does the person report having had the experience of meeting people she does not know but who seem to know her, perhaps by a different name? Often, those with DID are thought by others to be lying because different parts will say different things which the host has no knowledge of.” 0 likes
“Managers usually have extensive knowledge of events and of the system. They are often available to explain to the therapist the internal systemic dilemmas that are not otherwise evident. Generally, they are fairly empty of affect. Another term for managers has been internal self-helpers (Putnam, 1989).” 0 likes
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