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The Way of Baseball: Finding Stillness at 95 mph

3.90  ·  Rating details ·  246 ratings  ·  28 reviews
Shawn Green’s career statistics can be found on the backs of baseball cards in shoe boxes across America: 328 home runs, 1,071 RBIs, .282 career batting average, All-Star, Gold Glove, Silver Slugger. . . . But numbers tell only part of the story.

His path to success was as grounded in philosophical study as in ballpark wisdom. Striving to find stillness within the rip-roari
...more
ebook, 224 pages
Published June 7th 2011 by Simon Schuster (first published March 1st 2011)
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3.90  · 
Rating details
 ·  246 ratings  ·  28 reviews


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Adam Vibert
I know almost nothing about baseball, but read this to see if there was anything I could learn from a mental/preparation perspective to help me in my own sporting pursuits.

One of the main takeaways for me were Shawn's views on 'being present' and not dwelling on the past, future and what competitors and other people are saying.

Being a baseball novice, there were players and baseball specific terms mentioned throughout the book that I'd never heard of. Whilst you can still get through the book as
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Max
Jun 12, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: sports
Shawn Green was an interesting player and a much more understandable persona now after reading this book.

The inclusion of a meditative philosophy in baseball would seem to go against the grain but baseball seems to be perfect for it's application.
Green comes off as very self-satisfied which is off putting, but his conclusions and approach are sound and interesting.

This book doesn't present anything new to people familiar with eastern philosophies but it's application to baseball is interesting.
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Jeff Lamb
Jul 24, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interesting look at baseball

It was pretty good. I enjoyed a lot of the “being in the moment” things and the stories about the struggles which you don’t hear very often. I liked his writing and the book flowed. I’d recommend it. I will say some parts read like a “I’m so good at being selfless, I’m better than others” but I think that’s just something I read into it. Actually I was surprised at how honest he was about disagreeing with coaching staffs so I’m sure that wasn’t his intent.
Tom Herzog
Jun 05, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Not finished yet, but enjoying this read on the mental aspects of the game. Mindset, the challenge to master attributes necessary in all aspects of life, often the the difference in our pursuit to be all who we are created to be. Shawn does a good job at speaking to the challenges which transcend all aspects of life. 👍
ybk
Sep 02, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Found out lots of quotes that is meaningful for awareness, presense, and non-attachment. He was a 'professional' baseball player and he practiced this meditation through his 'career.' That means finding stillness is not only from basecall but from everywhere - he also refered to Pirsig, as he read Zen and Mortorcycle when he was a senior at highschool.
Nelson Cruz
Aug 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A really awesome book !

This book really brings to light a lot of the key things to use when at the plate from a player who had a short but great tenure as a major league
Adam
or Zen and the Art of Hitting. Shawn Green's pop Buddhist baseball memoir is an interesting personal story and a great baseball story from one of my favourite Jays. The book is pretty genuinely beautiful at times, and its greatest value is in expressing the beauty of baseball and life, and baseball's relationship to life, in ways that differ from the usual. But it's not particularly well-written, and sometimes left me wondering if it would've been better had Shawn Green written this without Gord ...more
Shannon
Dec 22, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2011
For me, the only thing that makes this book 2 stars instead of 1 are the real-life stories (especially about the Blue Jays) and the perspective it gives into the mind of the major leaguer (some intentionally, some not). Otherwise, Shawn is not a great writer (which would mean Gordon McAlpine is not either?) and the writing lacked flow - kind of like a chatterbug who yammers on and dances around between topics. I appreciate the message of the book and what he was trying to convey - and I respect ...more
Bob
Jun 10, 2011 rated it it was ok
I give credit to Green for writing a nontraditional book about his baseball career. Green does not focus too much on the actual on field events of his career, but rather on his method of preparation to play. Green uses the book to share how meditation helped him become a better hitter. There is a lot in the book about Green hitting a ball off of a tee over and over and over and over.

The problems with the book are:
1) Green (helped by Gordon MacAlpine) still try to shoehorn some baseball anecdotes
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Eric
Oct 18, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I found Green's book a mixture - lots of nice passages about mindfulness, some interesting stories from behind the scenes of Major League Baseball, and more technical info about the art of hitting than I could handle.

It was a relatively quick read. Aside from the mindfulness stuff I also enjoyed getting the sense that he's quite a nice guy.
Sue
Jun 27, 2011 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Sue by: The Jewish Week
Parts of this memoir by Jewish baseball player Shawn Green got too technically involved in different batting stances, &c. But overall it was a thoughtful description of how he used Buddhist meditation & Buddhist approaches both for playing major league baseball & also just for living his life. I appreciated his honesty about what his mistakes as well as his successes.
Clyda Joy
Feb 16, 2012 rated it really liked it
I really enjoyed this book and my favorite part of baseball games ihe orally the hotdog. It's about so much more but those with kids, or grandkids, in baseball or softball could learn a lot too. Those who have done their own inner work in personal development will appreciate it more and recognize in the author a person who has worked hard to know himself. It actually made me cry.
M
Jul 23, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
There's a lot more about the approach to hitting specific pitchers and playing in the big leagues than most MLB memoirs. Refreshing not to rehash games and seasons generically like some USA Today article: he recounts certain games from his own point of view that are important to his story and to him personally.
Martin
He over told the message of "oneness", even though I appreciate it and apply it to my life as well, it seemed like it was mentioned every page in the same fashion.

However, I really enjoyed the behind the scenes stories he told about his relationships with baseball players, coaches, fans etc.

I always liked watching him play, and I wish more players approached the game the way he did.

Carolyn
Aug 27, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I wasn't sure how I'd feel about a book that combined baseball with Eastern philosophy, but it really worked for me. On one level, I enjoyed the inside look at the day-to-day life of Shawn Green, one of my favorite Dodgers. On another, I was inspired to follow his prescription for mindfulness meditation.
Jane
Apr 09, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very enjoyable, especially if you like baseball. The information and explanation of what a hitter sees and how he reacts and adjusts was interesting. The writing was good, but I didn't pick this up for the writing as much as the content.
Nick Locke-henderson
This is one of my favorite books I love how Shawn Green explains how he was able to be so successful in the major leagues. My favorite part was when he explains the kind of zone he was in when he had his historic 4 home run game.
Heidi Hansen
Jan 26, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A good book of his journey through baseball & the way he chose to interact with fans. Court was the recipient of his gracious ways one day at CB Park. It was really something. I love that guy, Shawn Green. Court gave me this book for Christmas.
Steven
Oct 28, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great book. The meditation stuff is strong, but the baseball stuff is also very interesting. Shockingly solid, thoughtful, and serious book.
Jim Trela
May 07, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Fun baseball autobiography. With some explanations of how one player coped with the mental aspects of his game
Kyle Schnitzer
I really wanted to like this. I tried to like this. However, I never found stillness in Green's memoir. It's a shame because he was one of my favorite ball players.
Stephen Parsons
Sep 08, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the baseball book I would have loved to have been able to write (though mine would have been from the pitcher's perspective). It is a GREAT read.
Tyler
Jul 19, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interesting read about a very talented Jewish baseball player.
Peter
Aug 07, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Really enjoyed this book. Gives an interesting inside view of the challenges of a professional athelete. Very much enjoyed the presentation of Shawn Greene's search to regain his swing.
Avi
Oct 05, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance...for baseball fans
Tom
Aug 04, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Kate Freeman
This is a great book with lots of baseball lore as well as lessons about life and the need to focus. Highly recommended.
Mitch
Aug 28, 2012 rated it liked it


At times a little long. But good insights.
D G
rated it liked it
Oct 06, 2012
Jacob Gagnon
rated it it was amazing
Aug 29, 2017
Michael
rated it it was amazing
Sep 28, 2017
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Shawn Greens career statistics can be found on the backs of baseball cards in shoe boxes across America: 328 home runs, 1,071 RBIs, .282 career batting average, All-Star, Gold Glove, Silver Slugger. . . . But numbers tell only part of the story.His path to success was as grounded in philosophical study as in ballpark wisdom. Striving to find stillness within the rip-roaring scene of Major League B ...more
“The difference between reacting and responding is subtle, but immense.” 0 likes
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