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The Man Who Invented Christmas: How Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits
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The Man Who Invented Christmas: How Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits

3.57  ·  Rating details ·  1,452 Ratings  ·  336 Reviews
As uplifting as the tale of Scrooge itself, this is the story of how one writer and one book revived the signal holiday of the Western world.

Just before Christmas in 1843, a debt-ridden and dispirited Charles Dickens wrote a small book he hoped would keep his creditors at bay. His publisher turned it down, so Dickens used what little money he had to put out A Christmas Car
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Paperback, 241 pages
Published October 25th 2011 by Broadway Books (first published January 1st 2008)
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Kathryn This book is based on the book with the same title as the movie, "The Man Who Invented Christmas" by Les Sandiford. This book was written in 2008.
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Matt
Dec 24, 2013 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: biography, christmas
A Christmas Carol is almost a perfect work of art. Unlike Dickens’ serials – sprawling, digressive epics like Bleak House, Great Expectations, and David CopperfieldCarol is short and succinct. It is neatly separated into acts, has only one major character, and heads confidently towards its conclusion from the very first page (a thing that can’t be said for Dickens’ longer novels, which grow ever wider and shaggier with each passing page).

I love A Christmas Carol. I read it every year, always
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Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)
Hooo! Just under the wire. I thought I’d finish this book a week ago, but life. Loved reading this right after Mr. Dickens and His Carol. It was a wonderful real-life/non-fiction counterpart to that fictional story. Informative and festive this book was a short and sweet little book about Dickens writing his Carol and how it shaped Christmas as we know it. Lovely.
Bam
After reading Mr. Dickens and His Carol: A Novel, a fictionalized account of how Dickens came to write his famous Christmas Carol, I was hungry for more information and found it in this nonfiction book which was published in 2008 and made into a movie this year.

Les Standiford's book is very engaging as well as informational and covers most of Dickens' life, not just the few weeks it took to write his most famous Christmas story. Why was it so popular at the time it was published and remains so t
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Jenn "JR"
This book is more about the professional and creative development of Dickens' work. There is a tremendous amount of context provided in the way that authorship transformed during the Victorian period.

There's a large amount of history of Dickens' relationship with different publishers and the way they did business. These are all things that are fairly factual and can be examined based on extensive documentation. It may or may not be as interesting to some readers as the original title suggests th
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Dennis
Nov 08, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Anyone who loves Dickens’ A Christmas Carol should read this book; The Man Who Invented Christmas will help its reader understand Dickens’ condition at the time he wrote the story, and the challenges he faced in getting it written at all, let alone in the few weeks he had to finish the project before the Christmas season passed him by.

But The Man Who Invented Christmas is much more than a book about a book. Instead, it is best understood as an excellent short biography of Dickens and an explana
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Donna Hines
A fabulous insight into the past, present, and future of what made Dicken's Classic works so revelant to today and how we as Americans celebrate current traditions related to Christmas with everything that entails.
This is a classic tale 'ghostly' if you will about a man and his struggles to not only support his family ( wife and 5 kids) but to also do so with dignity and class.
During the 1800's it was not easy to make a name for oneself and Dicken's didn't initially set out to become a famous w
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Alvaro Zinos-Amaro
Dec 24, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-2017
Concise biographical insight into Dickens & the impulses and context for his creation of the beloved literary classic A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Smooth, highly readable prose but plenty of facts too. I particularly enjoyed learning about the Christmas writings of authors prior to Dickens--such as Washington Irving's non-fiction on the subject--as well as writers mostly forgotten today who were greatly influenced by Dicken's "little carol," such as Benjamin Farjeon. If you're a writer, or interested ...more
High Plains Library District
Not only do we learn about Charles Dickens and the creation of 'A Christmas Carol' but also a brief history of (1) publishing/marketing during the mid 1800s, (2) the horrendous condition of workhouses and the poor of London, and (3) the Christmas holiday. All of this in a small, non-intimidating book. Happy Holidays!

~Victoria
Tarissa
Dec 23, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“Celebrating Christmas without some reference to A Christmas Carol seems impossible, a remarkable fact given that the book was published more than 150 years ago. Indeed, the resonance of the story has remained so strong through the generations that commentators have referred to Dickens as the man who invented Christmas.”

So, this book needs a change in its cover art. If you, like me, judged this book by its Christmasy cover, all red, green, and candy canes... and randomly thought it was a story
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Tony
Dec 23, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: biography
THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS. (2011). Les Standiford. *****.
The full title includes: “How Charles Dickens’s ‘A Christmas Carol’ Rescued His Career and Revived out Holiday Spirits.” That’s a real mouthful, and can probably be used as the total review of this book by that skillful writer, Mr. Standiford. His last several books have all been non-fiction, where he has seemed to have found his metier. His first writings were all crime fiction featuring a series hero, John Deal, a real estate devel
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Les Standiford is a historian and author and has since 1985 been the Director of the Florida International University Creative Writing Program. Standiford has been awarded the Frank O'Connor Award for Short Fiction, a Florida Individual Artist Fellowship in Fiction, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction, and belongs to the Associated Writing Programs, Mystery Writers of Ameri ...more
More about Les Standiford...
“The more a man learns, Dickens said, “the better, gentler, kinder man he must become. When he knows how much great minds have suffered for the truth in every age and time… he will become more tolerant of other men’s belief in all matters, and will incline more leniently to their sentiments when they chance to differ from his own.” 1 likes
“Society.” John Forster, who would one day become Dickens’s great friend, adviser, editor, and first biographer, wrote in the Examiner that Dickens had excelled particularly in his portraits of the ludicrous and the pathetic, all rendered in an “agreeable, racy style.” 0 likes
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