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Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not
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Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not

3.71  ·  Rating details ·  55 Ratings  ·  6 Reviews
Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not provides a striking new answer to the classic question of why Europe industrialized from the late eighteenth century and Asia did not. Drawing significantly from the case of India, Prasannan Parthasarathi shows that in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the advanced regions of Europe and Asia were more alike than different, both ...more
Paperback, 365 pages
Published October 31st 2011 by Cambridge University Press (first published January 1st 2011)
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Dan
Sep 13, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2014
Very interesting, persuasive book asking the reader to stop looking for what intrinsic factors made Europe "succeed." A better approach, according to Parthasarathi's argument, is to examine the overall social, political, and economic context that stimulated the various choices and decisions that individuals and governments made.

Parthasarathi emphasizes the role of state action in causing the differences that emerged, and he argues persuasively. I would guard against haphazardly applying that res
...more
Mega  Chan
Feb 23, 2018 rated it really liked it
Based on the Great Divergence's method, this book examines why India fell behind. Intriguing perspective yet it feels like it lacks the true reason. Instead I felt the book blamed the British too much on India's backwardness instead of looking to the reason why India though certain regions were prosperous never unified and when it did, the Mughals didn't do enough of a good job in governing the economic situation.
John
Nov 30, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Nice addition to the divergence literature...I ended up liking it better than Pomeranz's book. Mainly because human agency plays a big role in this book - divergence makes more sense to me as the result of the pressures and conditions that affected the decisions people made, rather than as the result of where coal was buried. Parthasarathi looks at India and Britain here, and argues that in many ways the two places were remarkably similar. India, however, was the world leader in producing and ex ...more
Shyam Sundar Sridhar
May 17, 2012 rated it really liked it
Recommended to Shyam Sundar Sridhar by: Rajesh V
An excellent revisionist book dealing with the Great Divergence between Europe and Asia. Parthasarathi shows how the conventional modes of analyzing this process is Euro-centric and outdated, especially with fresh new research in overlooked areas of scientific and economic development in India between 1600 and 1800. This book totally reworked my imagination of India in those centuries. A minor drawback of the book would be the copious details that the author provides on trade, prices and types o ...more
J.M. Hushour
Feb 24, 2013 rated it liked it
Prasannnnan takes on every divergence-writin' historian suckah in this book, which even deals a gutterpunch to Pomeranz. It wasn't ecology, coal, and the necessity of innovation which made Britain pull forward. Nope. Nice try, Ken. It was basically the British state was so goddamn interventionist and basically called the shots (counter Adam Smithy) via protectionism and other shit, which eventually decimated the South Asian textiles trade, etc. Pretty good, but he might be imbuing the Indian sta ...more
Bob
Jul 15, 2012 rated it it was amazing
A superb deconstruction of the 'clever little England' theory of world history. Full of fascinating detail on the advanced and prosperous state of the Indian economies and intellectual life before the onset of the imperial period, with its wholesale abandonment of education and industry.

Has a serious (implicit) lesson for modern polities (like Britain) that have taken the de-industrialising path.

I found this a valuable addition to Eric Mielants' The Origins of Capitalism and 'The Rise of the We
...more
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