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Main Street

3.76  ·  Rating details ·  21,076 Ratings  ·  862 Reviews
With Commentary by E. M. Forster, Dorothy Parker, H. L. Mencken, Lewis Mumford, Rebecca West, Sherwood Anderson, Malcolm Cowley, Alfred Kazin, Constance Rourke, and Mark Schorer.

Main Street, the story of an idealistic young woman's attempts to reform her small town, brought Lewis immediate acclaim when it was published in 1920. It remains one of the essential texts of the
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Paperback, 454 pages
Published November 1st 2000 by Modern Library (first published 1920)
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Paul Bryant
Jun 16, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
On page 25 I thought – this guy is brilliant.

On page 50 I thought – this guy is exhaustively brilliant.

On page 100 I thought – I’m exhausted.

On page 150 I thought – I’ll never get out of this novel alive.

On page 200 I thought – so who knew there could be so much DETAIL about every last possible aspect of one teensy Minnesotan town lodged inside the Tardis-like head of Sinclair Lewis?

On page 213 my eye fell upon this :

It’s the worst defeat of all. I’m beaten. By Main Street. I must go on. But I c
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Alex
Nov 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2014, rth-lifetime
"A bomb to blow up smugness" is what one woman hopefully calls her child in Sinclair Lewis's broadside attack on mainstream America, and that's surely what this book is.

I didn't know a book can be quiet and bombastic at the same time, but Lewis has written it. It covers just over a decade in Carol Milford's life, as her dreams are repeatedly drowned. She comes to Main Street, America, with grand plans to mean something in a dimly socialist way. Main Street is having none of it.

Lewis has a messag
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Duane
This was Lewis first novel, published in 1920, and it was a huge success, both critically and commercially. It made him a rich man and launched a career that would include the Nobel Prize for literature in 1930. Lewis felt that Main Street should have won the Pulitzer Prize in 1921 but was edged out by Edith Wharton's, The Age of Innocence. It so incensed Lewis that when he did win it in 1925 for Arrowsmith, he refused to accept the award.

Main Street was the first major novel that featured small
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Kim
Aug 13, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: kindle

I was dimly aware of Sinclair Lewis but completely unfamiliar with his work when I read John Steinbeck's Travels with Charley: In Search of America a couple of years ago. Steinbeck, who admired Lewis, wanted to find his way from St Paul to Sauk Centre, Lewis' Minnesota hometown and the town on which the fictional location of this novel, Gopher Prairie, is based. He recounts his conversation with a waitress in a diner who gave him directions to the town: "They got a sign up. I guess quite a few f
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Chrissie
Dec 31, 2013 rated it liked it
I definitely liked this book and recommend it to others. There is so much to think about; it can be discussed from many different angles. So what are its topics? First of all, life in small towns versus life in cities. This is what the book is said to be about. Love is another theme. It is not a soppy love story though! Maturing, becoming an adult, figuring out how to live in a real world, not a world of only idealistic dreams. It is about growing up, not the teen years, but the years after that ...more
Evan
Small-town America. Ah, the scent of pine. The musty ramshackle old hardware store.

But what is this? Something amiss in one of these romanticized burgs? Something dark and sinister?

"I never imagined something like this would happen in our town," says the half-toothless talking head on the six o'clock news about the murder, even though you've seen this very thing happen in small towns 10,000 times in your life on the six o'clock news.

Small-town America is supposed to be different somehow; supp
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Jeannine Mason
I can't properly rate this book, because I did not enjoy it (or finish it yet), but I appreciate the satire and how its "commentary" on small minded people still holds true today.

To me, Lewis didn't try to build deep, interesting characters, he built representations about everything that reeks in society. This is a book that says, "You think you can change the way people think? Well, follow me to Main Street, and we will see about that." He treated the protagonists and antagonists with the same
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Cindy
Mar 04, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Those stuggling with life in a small town
Recommended to Cindy by: Sister
I had just moved to a small town in Minnesota - with the same aspirations as this classic charater of many years before me, yet my thoughts and run ins were very much the same 50 years later. It was a reminder that one fits or one doesn't fit but to spend your life trying to change the engrained to your likely only means you will spend your life in turmoil, in hopes others after you, long after you will find the place more to your liking. Shortly afterwards - I moved.
Leslie
This book went on too long for me -- I ended up losing interest in and patience with Carol. I felt like I should sympathize with her but didn't in fact do so.

Lloyd James was very good with the narration which did help me persevere through.
Manab
Mar 20, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
পরথমত নামটা ভালো হইছে বইটার। একটা মফসবল ধাঁচের শহরের কলানতির পরথম নিদরশন ত তার ঐ রাসতাটাই - বাংলায় রাসতাটারে কী বলে? বাজার রোড?
দবিতীয়ত, বইটা ভালো লাগে নাই। লুইসের রসবোধ যে পরখর সেটা জায়গায় জায়গায় বের হয়ে আসলেও তিনি মোটের উপর সেটা ঢাকতেই সচেষট, কারণ তিনি সিরিয়াস বই লিখছেন। আবার, তিনি সিরিয়াস বলতে সিরিয়াস বইই লিখছেন, যেটা কথা বলবে তাঁর সমকালীন বিষয়াপততি নিয়ে, ফলে খুব বেশি কেতাকানুনের জায়গাও সেখানে নাই।
যে কারণে বইটা সময়ের দলিল হয়ে উঠছে, কিনতু উপনযাস হিসেবে খুব ভালো কিছু হয়ে দাঁড়ায় নাই। সুযোগ ছিলো
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Bright Young Things: November 2015- Main Street by Sinclair Lewis 23 23 Nov 29, 2015 12:08PM  
Ending 5 37 Feb 01, 2014 12:39AM  
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Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1930 "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters." His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American capitalism and materialism between the wars. He is also respected for his strong characterizations of modern working women. H.L. Mencken wrote of him, "[If] the ...more
More about Sinclair Lewis...
“I think perhaps we want a more conscious life. We're tired of drudging and sleeping and dying. We're tired of seeing just a few people able to be individualists. We're tired of always deferring hope till the next generation. We're tired of hearing politicians and priests and cautious reformers... coax us, 'Be calm! Be patient! Wait! We have the plans for a Utopia already made; just wiser than you.' For ten thousand years they've said that. We want our Utopia now — and we're going to try our hands at it.” 51 likes
“They were staggered to learn that a real tangible person, living in Minnesota, and married to their own flesh-and-blood relation, could apparently believe that divorce may not always be immoral; that illegitimate children do not bear any special and guaranteed form of curse; that there are ethical authorities outside of the Hebrew Bible; that men have drunk wine yet not died in the gutter; that the capitalistic system of distribution and the Baptist wedding-ceremony were not known in the Garden of Eden; that mushrooms are as edible as corn-beef hash; that the word "dude" is no longer frequently used; that there are Ministers of the Gospel who accept evolution; that some persons of apparent intelligence and business ability do not always vote the Republican ticket straight; that it is not a universal custom to wear scratchy flannels next the skin in winter; that a violin is not inherently more immoral than a chapel organ; that some poets do not have long hair; and that Jews are not always peddlers or pants-makers.

"Where does she get all them theories?" marveled Uncle Whittier Smail; while Aunt Bessie inquired, "Do you suppose there's many folks got notions like hers? My! If there are," and her tone settled the fact that there were not, "I just don't know what the world's coming to!”
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