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The Rainbow and The Rose (Heron Books)
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The Rainbow and The Rose (Heron Books)

3.84  ·  Rating details ·  455 Ratings  ·  41 Reviews
John Pascoe, a retired military flyer and commercial pilot, has crashed on a remote Tasmania mountain while attempting a rescue. Another pilot and friend, Ronnie Clark, volunteers to rescue the injured flyer. Through strange dreams that appear to Clark we glimpse Pascoe's past family life with its secrets.

The Heron Books have no ISBN.
Heron Books serial number: 13 022 12 R5
Faux leather hardcover, 308 pages
Published 1969 by Edito-service (first published 1958)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Cherie
May 18, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The author said it all for me.

"I had reached the happy ending of the story, and I was quietly, serenely happy. In the soft, velvety darkness I lay utterly at peace for I had finished with all heartaches, with all pains and worries; nothing could touch me now. I had finished the book but I could take it up and read it over and over again, and I would do so, secure in the knowledge of the happiness in the last chapter... Everything was all right now."
Algernon
Sep 04, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2011
this book confirmed, as if I needed one more reason, the high position of Nevil Shute in my list of favorite authors.
This is the story of a life spent flying, from the flimsy bi-planes of WWI to the transoceanic routes of the 50's, the story of a man who takes quiet pride in his skill and carries on his shoulders the heavy burden of some doomed love affairs without turning bitter. He is a solitary man, yet the friends he makes along the way will put everythinh away and come to help him in his ho
...more
Janice
Canadian connection - character was Canadian ex-pat, living in Tasmania.

I was pleasantly surprised with this book. I didn't really have high expectations, and sometimes that is a good thing. I thought Nevil Shute's approach was unique. The present day was in the POV of the pilot who was attempting to rescue his friend. Any time he fell asleep, he dreamed of Johnny's past and thus told his story.
Chrisl
Sep 05, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, australia, 1950s
One of the many books by Nevil Shute I've enjoyed re-reading. Most remember the setting,a strong story element.

Found this piece at the Nevil Shute Foundation website

"By Bill McCandless

"The story is set in Northern Tasmania, a sparsely populated island South of Australia, in the 1950's. Here a retired Airlines Captain named John Pascoe operates a small aero club and crop-dusting company. We find that he has retired after 45 years as a military flyer, a flight instructor, and a commercial pilot fo
...more
Matthew Meyer
Sep 12, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Johnnie Pascoe, a retired pilot, and his passenger have been injured in a terrible plane crash virtually in the middle of nowhere. Johnnie’s former student and long-time friend, Ronnie Clarke, must now go on an impossible mission to save him and his passenger before it is too late. As the story goes on, the clock begins to run out and the weather itself is making it even more difficult to conceive a thought of going to Johnnie’s location. With the terrible weather having few breaks, Johnnie and ...more
Natalie
Can a man make something respectable of himself in imperfect times?

This is a story of a pilot's life in a postwar economy, of how easy it is to be unlucky in love and how hard it can be to establish a stable family life after a war. Men and women, old and young, make an effort to put life back together again. Relationships and disappointments grow out of checkered pasts. Respect comes where it's due but sometimes not when it's most wanted. Satisfaction and tranquility are possible, but sometime
...more
Jim Puskas
Feb 08, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: human-relations
Probably the most openly romantic of Shute's novels. It bears all the usual Shute characteristics: Lots of stuff about aviation; quaint 1940's mores regarding sex (even though it was written in the mid 50's); and that trick, unique to Shute of suddenly shifting viewpoints from one time & place to another far removed, even to changing narrator in mid-sentence. Those familiar with "In the Wet" or "An Old Captivity" will be somewhat prepared for these abrupt literary gymnastics and will take th ...more
Nora
Apr 13, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
I can remember reading this book for the first time when I was 15. What most amazed me about Nevil Shute's writing is that I could get so absorbed, so lost in it, that finishing a long section was like waking from a dream. In this book he layers in flashbacks and dreams in such a compelling way it can be hard to remember that you are not part of the story.
I have re-read this book once or twice and have to say that nothing is lost by already knowing the outcome. For so many books the payoff is th
...more
Sybil Powell
Aug 01, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It's odd but after every Nevil Shute book I read I think this is my favourite book and The Rainbow and the Rose is no exception. As often happens in his books it's two tales in one. One an attempted landing on an impossible air strip in an attempt to save a friends life and the other a life lived to the full by an flying instructor both intertwined in a most believeable way. A really great story, it's my favouite book!
Vikas Datta
Nov 26, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another delightful and exhilarating Shute work... the adventure component is gripping and the romantic interlude(s) tenderly tragic... above all, has an unprecedented degree of altruism and another spiffing narrative device
5greenway
Jun 21, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
What's great about this book is the way so much is packed into it - all kinds of stuff on identity, ghosts, possession, time, a first-person narrative with genuine sense of peril - enclosed in a hard-boiled but affecting romance about Men Who Fly Planes. Felt a touch slow to get started (but that just might have been not having much reading time when I began it), but top-notch.
Cyndi Smith
Jul 17, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
he has hypnotic writing style and his period and sense of time is spot on because he was living in it.
Pia Konstmann
Mar 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
At the back of the frontpage of my "Regnbuen og Rosen" (Danish translation) is written my name and year ('78) in this old paperback, kept together with a rubber band. It should be a fine silk ribbon since this book has meant so much to me. In '80 I began to fly gliders and wanted more than anything to fly these small aircrafts and to go and land on islands and "far away" places. But sadly it never came further than flying gliders for just 10 years..
All the Nevil Shutes books I've read has been m
...more
Al
Apr 13, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Johnny Pascoe, a flying instructor, decorated war pilot and commercial flyer, retires in the late 1950s to a remote village in Tasmania to start a small aviation business. Pascoe's reported crash in a remote part of western Tasmania motivates one of his past pupils (Ronnie Clarke), now a commercial pilot in Australia, to volunteer to fly a small plane in to rescue him. The story describes the rescue attempt, but at the same time spins out Pascoe's life story through the awkward device of having ...more
Sue
Apr 23, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Ronnie Clarke is a pilot with Australian Continental Airways. During a turn-around, he hears on the news that pilot Johnny Pascoe was seriously injured in a crash while on an errand of mercy to fly out a sick child to the hospital from a remote area. It was Johnny who had taught Ronnie to fly some thirty years before and Ronnie determines to see what he can do to help. The plan is to either fly Johnny and the child out, or drop a doctor in. Weather conditions make landing impossible. Ronnie spe ...more
Fred Pullen
Sep 01, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I enjoyed this very much, but I won't give any spoilers. It's a rather simple story, but told in a curious way. Let me share more about the technique, if not the actual plot itself.

Nevil Shute tends to write stories about people in England, flying, WWII, Australia, or some combination thereof. He relies on action and dialogue to give you an indication of what his characters are thinking, and what kind of people they are. In this book, Shute used an interesting device: The protagonist realized th
...more
Scilla
Mar 17, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Johnny Pascoe has had a long career of flying airplanes. Just before he left for WWI, he married the beautiful actress Judy. After the war, she went to Hollywood with their daughter and then divorced him. He is now retired running a small air service in a remote part of Tasmania. He has a crash trying to get to where he could evacuate a young girl with appendicitis. Ronnie Clark, a pilot on flying in Australia who learned to fly from Johnny, hears about the accident and volunteers to go to Tasma ...more
Jean Brodie
I loved Nevil Shute books about 30 years ago and decided to reread this one. Once I got into it, thoroughly enjoyed it and easy to read. However, was slightly irritated by the writing technique- a story told through someone else's dreams (who has coherent and logical dreams????) and the Judy Judy bit annoyed me slightly.
Nonetheless, this book is over 50 years old and has worn well. Will reread another
Kerry
Mar 17, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Marvelous story with many details about flying older planes. It was written in the 50s, and written with a sense of urgency. A pilot crashes, and a friend goes to help, but due to weather conditions must delay the rescue mission, and as there is no room at the local hotel, he stays at the crashed pilot's home, wearing his pajamas and sleeping in his bed, and dreaming his history...all very strange, but intriguing. There are a few twists and turns, and it is a very satisfying book to read.
Alison
Sep 25, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A great story, taking in the history of commercial flight,from the First World War and the life of a flying instructor in England in the 30s to inter-continental airways in the late 50s. Love stories to die for; triumph and tragedy. Shute seamlessly uses an unusual method to get inside his character's mind and memory.
Carolyn (in SC) C234D
I wrote in 2007: I like his style very much. You can just read, read, read. The story--a pilot goes on a rescue mission to get medical aid to a pilot who has crashed in a remote area of Tasmania. It was the pilot who had taught him to fly many years before. ...Loved it!

This reminds me that it is time I read another Nevil Shute book; I have enjoyed several.
Sharon Zink
Aug 24, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2015
A nice story about a flyer in World War II and his subsequent life and loves. The immediate plot is about trying to get medical help to this retired flyer when he is seriously injured while flying in Australia.
Paula S
A sweet story about the life and loves of a pilot, told using an unusual frame story where the narrator experiences the pilot's life through dreams. Not one of Shute's best, but an enjoyable read nevertheless.
Sue Lee
Aug 06, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Read this book as we are having a visit to our Probus Club from Janet Fenton from Meleleuca South West Tassie. She is daughter of Dennie King. Nevil Shute visited Meleleuca and wrote this book after his visit.
Donnelle
Jan 03, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It was there, so I read it (a holiday re-read when I ran out of books). Still light and enjoyable. An easy and entertaining read.
Meghan
I love that Shute managed to tell the entire story of a man while he lay unconscious in some isolated place.
Thomas
Oct 12, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Is this my favorite Nevil Shute? No. But I love his books so much it is hard for me to give them anything less than 5 stars.
Richp
Feb 08, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was very good, and certainly recommended to someone who wants something different hasn't read Shute or Ernest Gann.
Joelle Anthony
Jul 14, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The story is fantastic, but the writing is truly incredible.
Deahna
Sep 09, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A lot different to the things I normally read but t was a great story although the ending was a lttle bit to sad for my liking I kind of expected it.
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Nevil Shute Norway was a popular British novelist and a successful aeronautical engineer.

He used Nevil Shute as his pen name, and his full name in his engineering career, in order to protect his engineering career from any potential negative publicity in connection with his novels.

He lived in Australia for the ten years before his death.
More about Nevil Shute...

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“Everything had come good at last, after so many years. I had reached the happy ending of the story, and I was quietly, serenely happy. In the soft, velvety darkness I lay utterly at peace for I had finished with all heartaches, with all pains and worries; nothing could touch me now. I had finished the book but I could take it up and read it over and over again, and I would do so, secure in the knowledge of the happiness in the last chapter.” 0 likes
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