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The Colors of Hope: Becoming People of Mercy, Justice, and Love

4.1  ·  Rating details ·  155 Ratings  ·  20 Reviews
Using artful narrative a seasoned pastor paints a fresh vision of the Christian life as a creative adventure that embodies solutions instead of merely pointing to problems.
ebook, 224 pages
Published May 1st 2011 by Baker Books
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(showing 1-30)
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Joshua Hake
May 04, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent book - gave me perspective on how I view people. Lots to think about. Will need to read again.
Shelli
May 04, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-of-2012
Approaching the christian life more like artists than lawyers...hmmm..yes! That is what I wish do. This is a beautiful book that I will re-read.
Bethany
Sep 04, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well written. So quotable. So fantastic. I want to be an artisan of hope.
Tim
May 10, 2011 rated it really liked it
This is a very imaginative, and compassionate book - calling Christians to reassess the meaning and behavior of their faith. Dahlstrom emphasizes the practical meanings of mercy, justice and love and portrays these characteristics as offering hope in a world which in so many ways is gray, washed out, and superficial.

This book is offered, I think, to the audience of believers in affluent circumstances who have access to much, but what they really need is a renewed direction and purpose with which
...more
Beth Peninger
Jan 23, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was a FANTASTIC book to end the month and year with. Richard Dahlstrom paints (pun intended) a beautiful picture of artistry as God's people using the primary colors of mercy, justice, and love to paint pictures of hope in this world. As has happened often I got about 2 pages in, put it down and ordered my own personal copy from Amazon. (Yay for Prime 2 day shipping!)
Yes, I knew within two pages it was a book I will want to mark up, read again, pass around, discuss.
As I said Dahlstrom draw
...more
Sean Post
Mar 08, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Every follower of Jesus has been given an invitation "to paint with the colors of hope by stepping into the story God is writing across the canvas of history", Dahlstrom writes. This thesis might be articulated with unfamiliar or post-modern sounding language, but the author is fundamentally challenging us to embrace life in the Kingdom. And not just a future Kingdom, but a Kingdom that has already been inaugurated through the work of Jesus. A Kingdom which is already being made visible in small ...more
Laura
Jun 26, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
"Our collective fixation on justification and being made right with God has sometimes had the effect of clouding out the grand plan God has for a restored heaven and earth, where nothing is left untouched by the glory, beauty, and healing power of Christ."

I don't have much patience for the church's tendency to respond to injustice or crisis with prayer. Prayer is great, but it's not the only thing we can be doing. Richard Dahstrom does not mince words in challenging this tendency, directly addre
...more
Ben McFarland
Oct 08, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It's weird to review a book by the pastor you've heard preach for 500+ hours over the past decade and a half. So I approach The Colors of Hope by Richard Dahlstrom with the two sides of familiarity: sure, I've heard a lot of it before, but it's really cool to see people you know in a book! This book actually has more new stuff to me in it than Richard's first book did, mostly as expanded conversations with people in my church, which is an excellent direction to go in for a book (and should conti ...more
David Jones
Dahlstrom has this incredibly disarming authenticity, like he could submerse you in a sea of despair and raise you up to dry off in the radiant and blinding sunlight of idealism before you realized that his words had reached your consciousness. Instead, though, he constantly deflates the romanticism of a perfect Christian world and provides seemingly mundane, but substantially realistic and sustainable, guiding principles.

I can imagine that somebody struggling or learning would easily grant a fi
...more
David Jones
Dahlstrom has this incredibly disarming authenticity, like he could submerse you in a sea of despair and raise you up to dry off in the radiant and blinding sunlight of idealism before you realized that his words had reached your consciousness. Instead, though, he constantly deflates the romanticism of a perfect Christian world and provides seemingly mundane, but substantially realistic and sustainable, guiding principles.

I can imagine that somebody struggling or learning would easily grant a fi
...more
Meepspeeps
I really liked Chapter 11 about resistance to God's will for our lives. I've used the phrase to myself, "God will open doors if this is the right path," but Richard reminds me that the Bible is full of stories where the doors and right path are not so clear. But the good news is that there is a path and despite all obstacles we are called to be faithful to it and follow it with God's help. The rest of the book was full of his personal life examples, but didn't seem to fulfill for me the idea of ...more
Margaret
When I began reading this book, I was turned off by the negative assessment of the western Christian and the western church. I think the author somewhat redeemed himself in my eyes in part 3 but my overall impression was still low. There were some excellent points made but I had troubled hearing them because of my strong aversion to the beginning. The artistic metaphor was stretched pretty thin by the end of the book.
Lee Bertsch
The book started off well but then drifted into an inspirational challenge to fulfill your life mission. Well presented but a shop worn topic. His early point about approaching scripture and the Christian life more like artists than lawyers is an intriguing one which I have been mulling over ever since.
Cindy
May 05, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I truly enjoyed this book. I found the author's writing easy to read and encouraging. His concept of painting our with justice, mercy and intimacy with God is simple and challenging at the same time. we all possess colors to color this world, we need to find our unique "colors" and be willing to share them.
Erin
Dec 13, 2011 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
I'd like to hang onto this and revisit in the future.
Martha
Apr 20, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Good book...makes you think!
Jessica
May 01, 2012 marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
[free nook book]
Kobie Moore
Aug 22, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
great book...especially the last few chapters. thankful for authors like this
Bo White
I nodded a lot in agreement, but wanted more....
Mandy Houk
Sep 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Brilliant, challenging, truthful.
Leo
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Bethanie
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Brittany
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Drew McMurry
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Mark Archibald
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Christopher
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Laura
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Marshall
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“When Jesus was wrapping up his days on earth, he didn't tell us to go to church. He didn't tell us to engage in a spiritualized version of channel surfing, as we hop from place to place in search of just the right programming to entertain us. He told us to get out and actually do the stuff he'd already been doing, painting the hope of God's reign on the canvas of God's world. He told us we're artists.” 3 likes
“Thankfully, God has shown us that hope, in its million different forms, always springs from three primary colors: justice, mercy, and love.” 2 likes
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