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Moths of the Limberlost

3.99  ·  Rating details ·  104 Ratings  ·  11 Reviews
Gene Stratton-Porter (1863-1924) was an American author, amateur naturalist, wildlife photographer, and one of the earliest women to form a movie studio and production company. She wrote some of the best selling novels and well-received columns in magazines of the day. She became a wildlife photographer, specializing in the birds and moths in one of the last of the vanishi ...more
Paperback, 128 pages
Published February 1st 2008 by Dodo Press (first published 1912)
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Lori
Jun 12, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: outdoor-nature
I obtained this as part of a reading challenge I'm involved in. The Limberlost Swamp location is only a short distance from my hometown and I have always enjoyed the authors work.

The detailed descriptions she provided are beautiful! She writes, "For a confession must be made that a perforated box is a passport to my good graces anyday." She goes onto exlain, "That particular shoe- box had brought me an Actius Lunda, newly emerged, and as yet unable to fly. I held down my finger and it climbed o
...more
Sharon
May 31, 2011 rated it it was ok
I remember reading my mother's old books as a child, among them one by Gene Stratton-Porter, so, when I got my Kindle and looked for free books to download, I got a number by the author. I enjoyed the old style of writing, the detailed descriptions, the glimpse into how life was. I was interested in the idea of such a likable main character being a racist. When I started on book two, Moths of the Limberlost and Girl of the Limberlost, it became obvious to me that racism was a thread through all ...more
Nickie
May 18, 2008 rated it liked it
I used the audio version from Librivox. I was lost often while listening and cooking at the same time. Yet Gene Stratton-Porter is one of my favorite authors and I want to give all her books an opportunity.
What this book did do for me is to excited me to take the kids up into the woods this spring. We are going Tuesday!
Gene wrote this book because she could not find a text book that explained clearly. Mind you this was the late 1800's. A fun side note is that Gene shares little nuggets from othe
...more
Beth
May 13, 2012 rated it really liked it
I liked best Gene's descriptions of how she learned about the moths. Although her detailed descriptions of the moths were not my favorite, I realize that at the time there was no other way to document these - black and white photography was very challenging to perform. We are spoiled by color pictures and video.
Marzie
May 19, 2015 rated it it was amazing
A magnificent book. Anyone who is genuinely interested in her moths should try to locate an original hardback edition. The eBooks do not show the exquisite workmanship (photos, watercolors) of the original edition. Sadly, the first edition can be pricey and hard to come by. There are copies to be had on AbeBooks.
Pat
May 26, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
I admit I skimmed over the detailed descriptions of the moths, but the stories of their life-cycles and Mrs. Stratton-Porter's working habits are well worth reading. I also enjoyed the anecdotes that she showed as the bases for scenes in "The Girl of the Limberlost".
Greymalkin
Jan 30, 2010 rated it did not like it
Shelves: classic-fiction
I didn't end up reading much of this because it turns out it is just a long article on the author's experiences with the flora and fauna of the Limberlost. Perhaps interesting to someone who is more into biology stuff than I am.
Courtney Brogle
Aug 26, 2014 rated it really liked it
This is a wonderful scientific look at the moths of the Limberlost with a descriptive writers touch. She not only describes certain moths, but gives her experience of finding them. Not to mention the author was doing things women didn't do in the 1900s.
Anthony Lara
Feb 23, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Having personal history both past and present in the author's stomping grounds, I really connected with the location of this work. Also after reading Freckles it was insightful getting into her nonfiction. Definitely a good read!
David
Nov 03, 2015 rated it really liked it
Recommended to David by: Annie Dillard - An American Childhood - Rereading America
Get the 1912 edition from the closed stacks at a library. Half the fun is reading such an old book. Also, the later editions skimp on the artwork.
Kara
Aug 11, 2010 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2010
This was more interesting then I thought it could be. I'm not sure what made me want to read it.
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She was an American author, amateur naturalist, wildlife photographer, and one of the earliest women to form a movie studio and production company. She wrote some of the best selling novels and well-received columns in magazines of the day.

Born Geneva Grace Stratton in Wabash County, Indiana, she married Charles D. Porter in 1886, and they had one daughter, Jeannette.

She became a wildlife photogra
...more
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