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The Immune System

3.97  ·  Rating details ·  119 Ratings  ·  12 Reviews
The Immune System, Second Edition has been designed for use in immunology courses for undergraduate, medical, dental, and pharmacy students. This class-tested and successful textbook synthesizes the established facts of immunology into a comprehensible, coherent, and up-to-date account of how the immune system works, rather than presenting immunology as a chronology of exp ...more
Paperback
Published May 25th 2004 by Garland Science (first published December 1st 1999)
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Benjamin
Sep 13, 2011 rated it really liked it
fairly dense in detail, but overall I think it is precisely the level of detail and specifics that I appreciate in a medical textbook. I keep pulling it out and finding new chapters that are worth reading, which is a good sign.
Angie
Dec 13, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Yes, the topic is interesting. Yes, I read it for an elective course. Yes, it's wordy and overwhelming at times but informational.
Samangie
Sep 25, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Rough for the first timer, but the more comfortable you become with immunology, the more comfortable you become with this book. I ordered it to fill in the gaps of our 'assigned' text in my immunology course. I loved it. Spent more time on making the details clear, which I appreciated. However, I could see how - if you're looking for a cliff notes version of immunology - this just wouldn't be your cup of tea. Only serious educators, and life-long learners need apply. I still pick it up from time ...more
Robyn
Jun 16, 2012 rated it really liked it
Bought for pharmacy school, used as a textbook for our Immunology course, but kept as a reference book.
Dana Komok
Feb 25, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: for-collage
I think it's my favourite textbook of all times!
Kai
Sep 07, 2009 rated it it was ok
this book is repetitive, contradictory, and generally extremely confusing

a poor choice in my opinion to learn immunology
Lindsay
Sep 11, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A very good textbook, although it gets a technical for an introductory course in immunology.
Elizabeth
Aug 25, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Pre-Med students, biomedical engineers, medical students
Delightful read. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in immunology.
Kirsten Frank
Jan 13, 2013 is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: science
Lots of information densely packaged.
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“Unlike some other immune-system gene families, whose genes are all clustered together on one chromosome, the 10 human TLR genes are distributed between five chromosomes. This reflects the ancient, invertebrate origin of the Toll-like receptors, which were present before the two genome-wide duplications that occurred during the early evolution of the vertebrates around 500 million years ago. On the basis of sequence similarities, the Toll-like receptors form four evolutionary lineages (I, II, III, and IV) that are descendants of the four Toll-like receptor loci formed by these two ancient genome duplications.” 0 likes
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