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Understanding Global Trade

3.6  ·  Rating details ·  30 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
Global trade is of vital interest to citizens as well as policymakers, yet it is widely misunderstood. This compact exposition of the market forces underlying international commerce addresses both of these concerned groups, as well as the needs of students and scholars. Although it contains no equations, it is almost mathematical in its elegance, precision, and power of ex ...more
Hardcover, 222 pages
Published April 25th 2011 by Belknap Press
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Nils Lehr
Sep 10, 2017 rated it really liked it
Definitely worth reading if you want a non-mathematical introduction to economic trade theory. Very clearly written. However, do not expect a long historical overview or extensive case studies, the book mainly covers published papers on economic trade in goods.
Frank Van De Pieterman
A bit technical, but helpful in explaining key concepts.
Frank Stein
Apr 11, 2016 rated it liked it
Despite claiming to provide a quick, non-mathematical introduction to contemporary trade theory, there’s a lot of material left broached and unexplained in this book. Nonetheless, it still provides a series of quick and scintillating insights into contemporary trade debates.

The book basically traces the evolution of trade theory over the past 200 years, from David Ricardo’s Comparative Advantage theory, which said that every country specializes in goods in which it has a relative advantage over
...more
Michael Kruse
A helpful book providing an overview of 200 years of economic theory relating to international trade. However, the book advertises itself as explaining this history in "plain English." It does not succeed. The book would have benefited from beginning each chapter or section with a brief statement of what was to be concluded, and then making the supporting case. Portions of the book are incredibly dense with lingo unfamiliar to anyone but economists, and with no clear sense of where the author is ...more
Jason Furman
May 14, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: nonfiction, economics
A terrific survey/explication of 200 years of research on trade theory and empirics. It is very much model-based with less immediate policy relevance, although Helpman says it is intended for a general reader it seems more pitched to a non-specialist economist.
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