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Hansel and Gretel

3.87  ·  Rating details ·  107 Ratings  ·  33 Reviews
It's a tale as timeless as storytelling itself: two children, lost in the woods, stumble upon a candy house that isn't all that it seems. From Hansel's trail of bread crumbs to Gretel's ingenious triumph over the witch, the details of this familiar fairy tale enchant children year after year. Now, in an update on her classic retelling, Caldecott Honor winner and New York T ...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published September 29th 2011 by Dutton Books for Young Readers (first published January 1st 1980)
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The Library Lady
Warning:Hansel and Gretel features child abandonment and a wicked witch and the tellling here (faithful to Grimm) and the illustrations carry that out. The picture of the witch heading into the oven is pretty graphic(her legs and bottom stick out and flames shoot out of the oven). It's especially disturbing since the witch is portrayed as a sort of mobcapped rag doll and not terribly scary. In sum, wonderful for people who want a lovely version of this story but not for the very youngest or for ...more
Lindsay Johnson
Nov 18, 2014 rated it really liked it
"Hansel & Gretel" is about two children whose parents cannot afford to feed them, so their mother convinces their father to take the children to the forest and leave them there so they cannot find their way home. Hansel overheard his parents talking and began to think up a plan to find their way home. He fetched some pebbles that shimmered in the night, so when their parents took them out to the forest, he laid them down in their path. Hansel and Gretel fell asleep in the forest, but when th ...more
Aleha Begum
Jun 26, 2012 rated it it was amazing
This story was enjoyed by a year 1 class and the children were engrossed in to the story. They enjoyed acting parts out and predicting what may happen next. The illustrations were good and the children were eager to see the pictures when reading the story to them. Overall, an enjoyable story which was read during story time.
Miriam
Oct 26, 2015 rated it liked it
Shelves: picture, fairy-tale
This was a perfectly nice, faithful retelling of the Hansel and Gretel story. I don't know why it didn't strike much of a chord with me; maybe the pretty illustrations are too bright where the story itself is dark?
Cj Lee
Nov 08, 2013 rated it did not like it
Shelves: fairy-tales
I have never read Hansel and Gretel but this retelling of this story is a disappointment for me. I really do not know if this book is appropriate for young children of pre-k or kindergarten. First, how the father abandons his children by listening to the children's stepmother was dishearten. How do you explain this to the children? Second, the witch wanting to fatten Hansel so she can eat him would give the children nightmares. I know that it would give me nightmares if I heard this story in pre ...more
Naomi Lazar
Dec 03, 2015 rated it liked it
After being taken to the woods to be abandoned by their father and stepmother, Hansel and Gretel, while lost in the woods and stumble upon a house made of candy. They start eating the house, but then they get kidnapped by an evil witch and Hansel gets locked in a cage to be boiled. Gretel then saves Hansel, steals the witch's jewels and they return home.

This book had beautifully colored illustrations that captured all the details of the witch's gingerbread house and the details of the forest and
...more
Simon Wojtaszek
Perhaps because I study fairy tales and write about them, I've waited so long to read this one to you. The look on Sam's face when he realized the evil motives of the stepmother, and Simon asking, "You wouldn't do that to us, would you?" just about broke my heart, as I knew it would. But by the end of the book, your spirits were lifted, you both were thrilled with the children's smart success and both of you made great observations, swearing that the stepmother and the witch were one in the same ...more
Sam Wojtaszek
Perhaps because I study fairy tales and write about them, I've waited so long to read this one to you. The look on Sam's face when he realized the evil motives of the stepmother, and Simon asking, "You wouldn't do that to us, would you?" just about broke my heart, as I knew it would. But by the end of the book, your spirits were lifted, you both were thrilled with the children's smart success and both of you made great observations, swearing that the stepmother and the witch were one in the same ...more
Jane G Meyer
Mar 22, 2012 rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-books
A nice retelling of this classic fairytale. The text works, the plot thickens, the children win the day, but I can never get over that wimpy father who won't stand up to his awful wife number two.

In general, I'm not a huge fan of Susan Jeffers' style of art (it's very muted and I like bolder colors and lots of whimsy), but there is one spread that is absolutely magical. The book opens to both pages, and no text. From left to right is the forest, black and white, tree after tree and the moon jus
...more
Meltha
Jun 30, 2015 rated it liked it
Amy Ehrlich actually wrote this version, and Jeffers illustrated it. The translation is pretty standard, though they do rather deftly get around mentioning whether the woodcutter's wife is the children's mother or step-mother and there's no duck sequence. The illustrations are pretty enough, leaning more towards pastel tones with a lot of very cute forest animals. If anything, they're a little too cute. The woods looks about as scary as Disney World. Even the bats are kind of cute. I'm also slig ...more
Jen Kahl
Jul 10, 2013 rated it really liked it
This is a wonderful retelling of the story Hansel and Gretel. The pictures are very nostalgic, yet not as bright as the one I remember reading as a child. The artwork is very beautiful yet it may not be as appealing to children as other versions of this story. The story is virtually the same; now that I'm older it makes me think that maybe this is not such an appropriate story to read to children, though because it's a classic, it should be read. I can see where this book could be useful in comp ...more
Jessica Block
Jul 10, 2013 rated it it was ok
This was one of the many books that I could find in the office room of my home growing up. I can remember not particularly enjoying this book as a younger student because the plot scared me. An older woman wanting to cook younger children was not a pleasant thought as a young reader. I think I became more aware of what books I would read after I found this book. As a future teacher, I will keep in mind that some of my students may feel this way about particular books. Children can very easily be ...more
Jade Wilson
Oct 28, 2012 rated it really liked it
I've always enjoyed this story. This story is about a young boy and girl named Hansel and Gretel. The two children go into the woods and Gretel leaves bread crumbs so they can find their way home. They get lost in the woods and can't find their way back home. Hansel and Gretel come across a candy house. Little do they know, the candy house is owned by a witch. This story would help explain to students that they shouldn't talk to strangers and take candy from strangers because it can be dangerous ...more
Justice Strong
Oct 27, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: traditional
I liked this version of the story because it added something a little different. When any story is retold it is being another perspective opportunity. The illustrations were very engaging throughout the tale. They were soft in tone, but supported the setting of the story. Something that I took away from the story was “drive”. Hansel had good intentions of helping his family, but ran into some trouble along the way. I would definitely recommend this book professionally and personally. In the clas ...more
Judy
Jan 08, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This version does not identify the woman as being either a mother or a stepmother to the children. At the beginning she is referred to as the woodcutter's wife. After that she is called the 'woman.' At the end, we are told that the woodcutter's wife had died.

I learned this, "Witches have red eyes and can't see very far, but their sense of smell is as keen as an animal's, and they know when human beings come close." and "Gretel had only the shells of crayfish to eat." (I hasten to add that shells
...more
Amanda V
Oct 23, 2012 rated it really liked it
Love the story of Hansel and Gretel and it was actually an obsession of mine growing up! This story capture the tale very well. The two children find a house made of gingerbread and candy and begin to eat, but then are found and captured by the evil witch that lives there. An excellent way to show students that they should never take what doesn't belong to them and to follow directions (like listening to parents when they say not to venture into the woods!).
bernadette
May 06, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
The story seems true to the Grimm version so not for young children who will worry about being abandoned by their parents or who can't handle the idea of a witch eating children. At first, I was not a fan of the illustration style but I was won over by the art by the end of the story. There are some beautiful illustrations in the middle, particularly the two page spread of Hansel and Gretel following the white stones back home in the moonlight.
Caligal
Jun 04, 2015 rated it it was amazing
As I read this to my 5 year old she sat captivated. I had to choose better words at some places, it's a retelling of a classic Grimm fairytale . Thus said, she stayed engaged the whole time through and had plenty questions at the end. Maybe for some kids this wouldn't be a good book but for us it was. I too remember having this book read to me as a young child by my grandma and loved it. It didn't seem so gruesome back then so wondering why now as a parent I am more sensitized.
Elizabeth Burr
Sep 02, 2013 rated it it was ok
Shelves: fairy-tales
I like this story but its kind of scary if you think that your parents could leave you in the forest. I know thats not the point of the story but i really just caught on to it. The boy leaving a trail for gretel and himself was a very start idea, because he knew what was happening. but the main idea for the story is saftey and talking to strangers.

You could use this book in safety week and let children know strangers might seem nice but that isnt really the truth all the time.
Becca
Dec 10, 2015 rated it liked it
I really wanted to like this one better. I love Jeffers' work, but the illustrations of this particular book did not seem to quite fit the story. She did stay closer to the original version with the text than some author/artists do, but the overall package is not one I will be buying this time unless I can't find another version that I really like, which is entirely possible. It's not that the illustrations are horrible--they are actually quite lovely. They are just not what I imagine.
Kelly Ramsey
Feb 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: fairy-tales
I like this story but its scary to think that your parents could actually leave you in the forest. The little boy leaving a trail for gretel and himself was a very start idea, because he knew what was happening. but the main idea for the story is saftey and talking to strangers.

You could use this book during safety week. You can talk to the children about strangers and what to do if they are ever approached by a stranger.
Kristine Mathias
A timeless fairy tale that involves family and strangers. It is full of safety lessons that teaches children to be aware of the people around them even when they are scared.

You could use this book during a safety week unit. Teaching children about trust and not talking to strangers or going with them no matter how sweet they may seem or what kind of treat they may offer you.
Lauren Sharp
Traditional Literature 2
This book was the classic tale about the two children who are left in the woods and find themselves wanting to be eaten by the witch with a house made of candy. In the end they are able to escape. This tale has been told many times and even been made into a movie. It is one of my favorites.
Betsy Brown
Dec 11, 2016 rated it it was amazing
As always, the illustrations give so much detail and are jewels for the eyes. My kinder-bears loved this story as our introduction to gingerbread week. They kept pulling this book from our holiday table for one more luck. This story is timeless and the beauty of Susan Jeffers illustrations take me back to my own childhood storybooks.
Carey Hanson
Nov 19, 2011 rated it really liked it
Shelves: t-and-l-544
Copyright 1980, 2011 (my copy is 2011) Traditional Literature

The pictures, by Susan Jeffers, are amazing. I enjoy the story of Hansel and Gretel and really enjoyed this one as it is retold by Amy Ehrlich. But it is the pictures by the NY Times bestselling artist that drew me to this book.
Tricia
Nov 11, 2011 rated it liked it
Timeless Grimm fairy tale is presented very well in this version by Jeffers, who has also created updates to a few other fairy tales including "Cinderella" and "Thumbelina". This version reads well aloud.
Mimi
Apr 08, 2013 added it
Shelves: 3601, transitions
Hansel and Gretel isn't one of my favorite fairy tales, but it is a classic. The students in my class really enjoyed this book! We talked about sequencing events with this story, and we also made gingerbread houses. This is a great text to use for transitions or Beginning, middle, and end.
Melissa
Nov 19, 2011 rated it really liked it
Wonderful! Full-length version of the story, with lovely descriptions and rich language. The illustrations are meticulous and as usual Jeffers especially shines when portraying animals and the natural world. LOVE the double-page spread of Hansel and Gretel coming home in the moonlight forest.
Michael Fitzgerald
Pictures are much too bright for this dark story.
Nadia
Jan 04, 2012 rated it really liked it
Fairly traditional story. Absolutely gorgeous illustrations!
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3392593
There is more than one author with this name

Biography:

Graduate of Pratt Institute 1964
Worked in the publishing field for three years
Began freelance career in 1968
Published first childrens book in 1970

Awards:

Caldecott Honor
Golden Apple Biennial Brataslava
The ABBY American Booksellers Best Book award
Society of Illustrators Awards of Merit
Golden Kite Society of Childrens Books Author Illustrators
More about Susan Jeffers...