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Sally Jean, the Bicycle Queen

4.02  ·  Rating details ·  230 ratings  ·  46 reviews
I can pop a wheelie, I can touch the sky,
I can pedal backwards, I can really fly!

Sally Jean was born to ride. And her bicycle, Flash, is just about her best friend. But one day something terrible - and wonderful - happens. Sally Jean grows. Suddenly she finds herself too big
for Flash. What's a Bicycle Queen to do? Finally, by collecting old bicycle parts to make a new bik
...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published April 18th 2006 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (Byr)
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Community Reviews

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4.02  · 
Rating details
 ·  230 ratings  ·  46 reviews


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Misha
Nov 03, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: children-s
Love this one. For one, Sally is awesome. It's about a girl who loves bikes but when her bike breaks and her parents can't afford a new one (yay--a picture book about families who aren't made of money!), she works in a junk shop and learns how to fix and make bikes. Then she even gives her old favorite bicycle away.
Sara Mangan
Sally Jean loves to ride bike. Unfortunately, she eventually out grows her bike. She has to be creative to find a way to get a new bike.

Genre: Contemporary realistic fiction because this story could really happen but the characters are fictional.

Writing traits:
1- Ideas- The main message of this story is something students could relate to. It has a good message of being creative and hard working to get what you want.
2- Voice- The author shares with us the excitement in Sally Jean's voice and she
...more
Miriam Axel-lute
Sep 24, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: all kids of cyclists
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Alison Reads
Jun 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I really appreciate any book that is both entertaining to read and demonstrates the power of hard work. Sally Jean is The Bicycle Queen and has been a bike lover her whole life. But when she outgrows her bicycle, Flash, she has to figure out how to get a new bike - she works jobs and, in the end, builds her own (like a boss!). I like the little ditties that Sally Jean sings to celebrate her milestones as well as the mixture of fonts and page layouts - they really help to keep the book fun.
Jannah
May 30, 2017 rated it really liked it
Sally Jean, a girl with a dream: she's going to be the bicycle queen!
As she grows up, Sally Jean grows up with her yard sale find of a bicycle, Flash.
But then SJ outgrows Flash. Her parents can't afford to get her a new bike.
Does she give up?
NO!
She volunteers to help someone with their junk to earn bike accessories, helps other people repair their own bikes to make a little money, and scavenges for parts until she can create a new two-wheeled sidekick.
I love this girl's persistence, creativity,
...more
Renita Eidenschink
Nov 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing
My very own bicycle queen loved this. What I especially enjoyed was the ingenuity and generosity of the main character--and *BONUS*, she out grows her bike and ends up teaching other kids how to fix their own bikes until she finds a way to get herself a new one. Anytime my daughters can read about a bold, got get 'em, fix-it-up girl, I'm game!
Dolly
May 04, 2009 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: parents reading with their children
Shelves: 2009, childrens
This is a great book; it's about growing up, self-reliance, recycling and putting old things to good use, and of course, bicycles. What more could you ask for in a book!?! It's a great book to read aloud. We really enjoyed reading this book together.
Dianne
Aug 01, 2018 rated it it was amazing
To celebrate our granddaughter's move to riding a bicycle, I found this perfect book at our library. I read it to her during a video chat which inspired her to check it out at her library. There are so many lessons hidden in the sing-song prose, though, that I ordered a copy and we read it every night during her visit. She now has it on her shelf and will likely have it memorized before long.

The book shows Sally Jean growing into various types of tricycles and bikes, enjoying each stage while l
...more
Powerm2
Jun 20, 2017 rated it really liked it
Sally Jean loves her bicycle since the day she learned at a very young age. As she grew in age and size, her bike stayed the same. Sally goes everywhere on her bike and has her group of friends who all ride. When she can no longer ride her bike because she does not fit, she comes up with a few plans that will help her get a new one.

Sally shows perseverance and dedication when it comes to getting a new bike. This book can be closely related to "Swimmy" to teach the lesson of perseverance as well
...more
Lynn  Davidson
Sep 03, 2018 rated it really liked it
This is a wonderful story of encouragement for girls - and boys - to put effort into what they want to accomplish. It shows that girls - and all children - can learn to make things happen for themselves. Great illustrations.
Amanda Walz
Jan 27, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
I love the way Sally Jean grew and learned how to think outside the box. That she solved her problem by thinking outside the box.
Michael
May 10, 2019 rated it liked it
A boastful claim
Davanh Souvanarath
I enjoyed reading along as Sally Jean grew with her bike. This story is about Sally Jean who loves to ride er bike, until one day she grows bigger than her bike. Sally Jean has to find a way to get a new bike but must come up with some money. I chose this book for my girl empowerment text set because it shows a young girl doing something she loves to do. Also, when something gets in the way she works hard to find a solution to her problem. At the end of the story she helps a little boy become a ...more
Christine Turner
Nov 06, 2014 rated it liked it
Shelves: 2x2, pln
I can pop a wheelie, I can touch the sky,
I can pedal backwards, I can really fly!
Sally Jean was born to ride. And her bicycle, Flash, is just about her best friend. But one day something terrible - and wonderful - happens. Sally Jean grows. Suddenly she finds herself too big
for Flash. What's a Bicycle Queen to do? Finally, by collecting old bicycle parts to make a new bike - and giving Flash to a young friend who longs for a bigger bike of his own - she rides
again! With exuberant art that's jus
...more
Felicity The Magnificent
Sep 04, 2011 rated it it was amazing
In this book when Sally was one, she rode on the back of her Momma's bike. When Sally Jean was two, she got her own tricycle. When she turned four, she had her bike with two wheelers with training wheels. When she was five, she took her training wheels off her two-wheeler. She practiced going up the hill and down the hill. Her Mom told her she had to raise her seat. And her bicycle got bigger. When she had to raise her seat a little more, she tried and tried but couldn't. Her brother and her fri ...more
Lynn
May 09, 2014 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Everyone
I really enjoyed reading this fun picture book to our first and second grade students!

A perfect book for April(Environmental Awareness month)/May (bike month) as Sally Jean grows with her bicycle, Flash, first learning how to ride it, then taking care of it and helping others to take care of their bikes, too. When she outgrows her bike, she must figure out a way to get another one, since her parents cannot afford to buy one. So what can she do?

With the help of a neighbor, her parents and friends
...more
Regina
This book was recommended to me as a picture book that positively portrays life in an urban environment. Sally Jean loves to ride her bicycle, Flash, but when she outgrows Flash she must get a new bike. But her family doesn't have the ability to buy her a new bike! Sally Jean learned to repair her bicycle and starts to help friends and neighbors out with their bikes. Through the process she realizes that she can build herself a new bike from used parts!
I loved the resourcefulness that the prota
...more
Emelda
Joe loves all things that move, but I try to focus on bikes and trains (as cars, trucks and construction machines are raping and murdering our planet). He LOVES this book. It follows Sally Jean and her bicycling neighborhood and family as she grows up. By the time Sally Jean turns 8, she needs a new bike but her family can't afford one. Being the resourceful girl she is, she opens a learn-to-fix-your-bicycle shop and tries to raise the funds for a bike on her own. She only raises enough for 2 ti ...more
Jackie
Nov 07, 2013 rated it really liked it
Through all the stages of Sally Jean's bicycle-riding life, we see her become more and more confident in her abilities...until that sad day when her most beloved bike, Flash, has become too small for her. Her parents can't afford a new one, but they did give her the 'tools' and self-reliance to figure out how to plan for a new one. She sets up her own bike repair business (after her parent's show her how to fix a flat, raise the handlebars, and adjust the seat). Little by little, piece by piece ...more
Jo
Feb 03, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Sally Jean loves to ride her bike named Flash but when she gets too big for her bike and her parents can't afford to buy her a new one until next year, Sally Jean must come up with a way to get a new bike now! Using old bicycle parts and junk Sally Jean finds in her neighbour's yard, she builds herself a new bike. I cycle, You cycle, Recycle Junk! Sally Jean even comes up with a way to reuse her old bike, by giving it to a younger boy in her neighbourhood!

What a fun and inspiring read. :)
Caroline (Cary)
Mar 26, 2013 rated it really liked it
All her life, Sally Jean has watched big kids on their bicycles and waited impatiently to be as big and as good as they are. When she finally outgrows her training wheels and gets her first big-kid bike, she and Flash (the bike) travel around the neighborhood, doing tricks and making new friends. Soon, though, Sally Jean grows too big to ride Rocket anymore, and begins the search for another bike. Rhyming songs that Sally sings while riding make this a fun read-along, and vivid, painterly illust ...more
Chantel
Jul 19, 2008 rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
Sally Jean LOVES her bike! But when she grows out of it and her parents can't afford to buy her a new one, what is she to do? Sally Jean is creative and forward thinking and she figures out a way to get herself a bike. Any child who reads this book will want to be creative like Sally Jean. Hooray for Sally Jean!
Samantha
May 06, 2013 rated it liked it
Sally Jean was practically raised on bikes, so when she outgrows her bike and there's no money to buy a new one she works hard to earn enough money to buy one on her own. The money doesn't quite roll in as Sally Jean had hoped so she recycles a bike she finds in her neighborhood and builds her next bike.

Watercolor illustrations on natural-colored paper give the story a faraway feel.

Joy Murray
Nov 20, 2012 rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-books
A charming book in which the girl becomes the mechanic and comes up with a way of getting a new bike, after she outgrows her beloved bike "Flash." I like that her parents can't afford to buy her a bike and she is challenged to come up with solutions for herself. The ending shows the power of generosity.
Jessica
May 17, 2016 rated it liked it
The storyline is fairly unrealistic. A two-year-old on a tricycle?? But, it has great descriptive writing! And teaches great lessons on perseverance and self-reliance. The animation in the illustrations is enjoyable.
Danielle Monroe
Apr 21, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children-s-books
This book is a great book to show that not everyone can get what they want when they want it. They have to work hard for what they want. A little girl grows too big for her bike and ends up building her own bike from parts she found in a neighbor's junk yard.
Heather
Sep 27, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: read-childrens
This book really captures the spirit and connection between and kid and his/her bike! I loved the detail of including little ditties that Sally Jean would sing as she rode her beloved bike. I also loved her resourcefulness when she didn't automatically get what she wanted.
Robin
May 13, 2013 rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-books
This is a good one to use for a bicycle-themed storytime that I plan to do in the future.
Marcelaine
May 04, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: childrens-books
Kevin and I have enjoyed this book. It is very cute and I love the way Sally Jean was so resourceful in finding a way to get a bicycle when her parents couldn't afford to buy her one.
Edenanna00
Aug 24, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: children-s-books
Great kids book! It does a great job of teaching the lesson of make do or do without.
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Cari Best has written many award-winning picture books, including Sally Jean, the Bicycle Queen, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, and My Three Best Friends and Me, described by the New York Times as “refreshing” and “exciting.” Her most recent picture book is If I Could Drive, Mama, was described by Publishers Weekly as “a wonderful tribute to an imagination in perpetual motion.” In ...more