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The Voice of the Dolphins and Other Stories
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The Voice of the Dolphins and Other Stories

3.63  ·  Rating details ·  64 ratings  ·  8 reviews
Binding: Trade paperback

Edition: Expanded ed.

Publisher: Stanford University Press

Date published: 1992

ISBN-13: 9780804717540

ISBN: 0804717540
Paperback, 194 pages
Published June 1st 1991 by Stanford University Press (first published January 1st 1901)
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3.63  · 
Rating details
 ·  64 ratings  ·  8 reviews


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Sheehan
Oct 24, 2013 rated it really liked it
So Szilard was one of the original guys who came up with the idea it might be possible to weaponize an atom by unleashing the power via fission. He promoted the science of it to the US with Einstein as a hedge against Hitler's fascism, and later learned to regret this decision after the Trinity test, when it was clear this genie was not going back in the bottle and not only going to be used to fight fascism.

This book, a collection of sci-fi stories written in the late forties about various possi
...more
Octavia Cade
Szilard, I think it is fair to say, was a man with one foot in the future - scientifically and politically at least. He, together with Einstein, wrote the letter that kick-started the Manhattan Project. Working on the bomb and using that bomb were quite different things, however, and one suspects that he never quite got over the latter.

The titular story in this collection is essentially a thought experiment: the establishment of a political environment where the threat of atomic war is ameliorat
...more
Robert Dormer
Mar 13, 2014 rated it liked it
Szilard was a man with many gifts, but a scintillating story teller, he was not. This stuff is, for the most part, *DRY*. Really it's more interesting as a historical document than as fiction per se. The last three stories are more enjoyable, and pretty witty to boot, if a bit dated in style. All in all, it's short enough to be worth a read, but don't necessarily expecting gripping plot so much as huge slugs of fairly tedious exposition that tends to read like the minutes of a political committe ...more
Willy Boy
Dec 20, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Unusual speculative scenarios by an Atom Bomb 'insider'. Dry, descriptive style reads more like a report or written thought experiment than prose. Seemingly rational (to a fault) and clinically detached, an apt reflection of the paradoxical nature of Cold War thinking. Strategy calculated to levels of mathematical precision at the limit of human ability (and beyond) masks bitter ironies and insanity. Only something greater than our own sense of self-importance could save us. Being a logical man, ...more
Bodicainking
Mar 05, 2017 rated it liked it
An interesting of short stories by an actual Manhattan project physicist; they are certainly not the most fantastic works of literature (witness the repeated references to committees, memoranda, meetings...) but give an interesting and at times powerful look into the mind of a man who was clearly very deeply aware of his moral responsibility for both the horrors and promise of the atomic age.
Carol
Aug 26, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
Short stories, ostensibly science fiction, although more political satire than science. The one liked best was "My Trial as a War Criminal", originally published in 1947. Set in a ficticious future in which Russia has won the Third World War by a biological attack on the US and brings to trial those responsible for the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, using the Nueremburg Principles. Szilard was one of the first to recognize the possibility of developing atomic weapons and the danger of Hitler ...more
Michael
Jan 09, 2011 rated it did not like it
I read this a while ago, and all I can remember is that it is a rather silly collection of Cold War-inspired stories by the guy who pretty much created the Manhattan Project.
Andy
Mar 27, 2015 rated it it was amazing
How on Earth had I not known about/read this before?
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